Interview with Cinematographer Christophe Graillot (A Bag of Marbles, La Garde)

Christophe Graillot is a true artistic talent. Just watch the recent film A BAG OF MARBLES to see how he conveys a story through light and shadows. It was on honor interviewing him:

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised? Was photography something you always wanted to do as your career?

Christophe Graillot: I was born in a suburb of Paris and raised in Paris. As long as I can remember I always wanted to be photographer. I have a background in graphic arts and I taught myself the trade of Director of Photography.

What has been your most proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project to date?

I don’t know. Every project I’m proud of. Every job I learn something new and unique. My favorite project is the next one.

Right now you’re working in Praque. What’s the film? And are you having an okay time in the Czech Republic?

I’m shooting a TV movie, A Christmas love story. We’re in a beautiful location called Mala Upa, which is close to Poland. All is good as I’m lucky working with a Czech crew. I’m working with an amazing Focus Puller.

Tell us about working on the film A BAR OF MARBLES. How does this film differentiate from other WWII films?

A special project for me. I was lucky to work for the second time with director Christian Duguay. Christian also an amazing Steady-cam operator. One of my most beautiful movie encounters. This film has the particularity of seeing the second World War from the point of view of two children.

Is there a type of film/TV show that you love to work on that you haven’t worked on yet?

I’d like to do a musical comedy and a boxing film. Two types of stylistic exercises.

What are you generally looking for in a director in order for you to do your job as best as possible?

A good story and their desire to find the best way to tell it. And their madness…!

What do you think a producer/director is looking for when they bring on you to DP the film?

Don’t know. Availability 😀

What is your passion in life besides photography and film?

My family. I take the opportunity now to thank my wife because it’s not always easy to follow the life of a DOP.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides the ones you worked on?

When I was young, I watched a french movie « La Grande Vadrouille » at least 30 times.

What advice do you have for young cinematographers who would eventually like to DP movies for a living one day?

Simple advice: Speak well to everyone, be on time and never forget how lucky you are to do this job!

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

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Interview with Cinematographer Dan Stoloff (Suits, The Americans, Zoo)

Dan Stoloff is one of the top television cinematographers working today. He also DP’d the films TUMBLEWEEDS, MIRACLE and CROOKED ARROWS to name a few. It was an honor interviewing him. Check out his website and list of credits at: http://danstoloff.com/

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised? Was photography something you always wanted to do as your career?

Dan Stoloff: I was raised in Newton, Mass, just outside of boston. I knew from the time i was about 11 that I wanted to be a cinematographer. We had a Super 8 camera and I started making my own films. It was my favorite thing to do, and I decided if there was a way to make a living doing it, I would.

What has been your most proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project to date?

I would say the 2 final episodes of “The Americans”. I was so fortunate to become a part of The Americans in season 5. One of my favorite shows of all time, and to get the gig was like The Rolling Stones asking me to join the band!

You DP’d a ton of SUITS episodes. A show filmed in Toronto. How are the Toronto crews? Do you like the fast pace of shooting a series like this in comparison to feature film?

I did almost 50 episodes of suits. All shot in Toronto. Love the crews there. Very technically proficient and so polite! I love the pace of episodic TV. Everyday seems unmakeable at the outset and yet daily we rise to the challenge.

The most famous film you probably worked on was MIRACLE. How did you get involved in that project? What do you remember most about that shoot?

I had shot “Tumbleweeds” for director Gavin O’Conner and we had a wonderful collaboration. He fought hard to get the studio to agree to have me on board. I had never done a studio project before and they were justifiably cautious. After many meetings with many execs they finally agreed to give me a shot. What was most memorable about that shoot was the way the project itself mirrored the actual subject. All those kids were real hockey players. The celebration you see at the end of that film was real. The tears were real. The kids puking during drills was real.

Is there a type of film/TV show that you love to work on that you haven’t worked on yet?

I would like to do a period project before electricity existed.

What are you generally looking for in a director in order for you to do your job as best as possible?

I love a director who knows his (her) material. Knows the characters and creates an atmosphere that provides the freedom for discovery.

What do you think a producer/director is looking for when they bring on you to DP the film?

Those are 2 different questions. The answer is as different as the people themselves. All want the project executed efficiently and on schedule and budget. Some directors want visual suggestions, others not. All producers want you to make the day,

What is your passion in life besides photography and film?

I love to surf, hike, kayak, do yoga, mountain bike ride, play guitar

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides the ones you worked on)?

The Godfather. The Big Lebowski. The Godfather part 2

What advice do you have for young cinematographers who would eventually like to DP movies for a living one day?

Educate your mind and your body. Go to museums, read novels, see movies, and stay in shape. Often our job is as physical as it is mental. Always get to set early. Be nice to everyone.

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PHOTO from the TV Show “SUITS”
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Tristan Oliver (Isle of Dogs, ParaNorman, Fantastic Mr. Fox)

It was a true honor interviewing the extremely talented Director of Photographer Tristan Oliver. Every single film he’s worked on has turned out great. And there’s not many people you can say that statement about! If you don’t believe, simply go to his website and watch some of the short films he’s worked on and see his list of feature credits: https://www.tristanoliver.co.uk/

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised? Was cinematography something you always wanted to do as your career?

Tristan Oliver: I was born and raised in Gravesend in Kent. An unlovely and somewhat godforsaken town on the Thames estuary.

I knew nothing about films or photography as a child. My main passion was the theatre. I wanted to act (or be a doctor or something) My first real contact with the camera dept came when I was acting in a movie. It was something of a Damascene moment and I really threw myself into trying to get into that environment immediately afterwards. I didn’t even own a stills camera when that movie started!

What has been your most proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project to date?

In terms of feature films I would say ParaNorman. I had a fantastic time at Laika for two years and a very close, creative and rewarding relationship with the directors of that movie. I’m exceptionally proud of how it looks (even if no-one has seen it.)

Can you explain to us what an Animation Director of Photography does?

There is really no difference in being a DOP for stop frame or live action. The ultimate aim is to create something beautiful for the camera. To light and frame according to what you consider to be visually special. I wouldn’t want to make concessions to the medium of animation. That is by the by.

In practical terms, there are a few differences. We typically run a 50+ unit shooting environment which is an enormous amount of stuff to keep tabs on. That’s 50 sets, 50 cameras all running together. I need to ensure continuity and quality of look across that huge mess of stuff.

Other than that the main difference is working into the macro end of the lenses which can severely compromise the depth of field. We tend to work at very tight stops (16, 22) to compensate for this.

You just finished working on ISLE OF DOGS. Can you give us a sneak peak of what do expect?

Unique. Many of his tropes will be familiar to audiences. The flat lighting. The highly symmetrical framing. The art direction and propping. This particular movie is very busy and visually complicated. Compared with Fantastic Mr Fox for example it is really intense viewing. There’s an awful lot going on up there!

Is there a type of film/TV show that you love to work on that you haven’t worked on yet?

I’d love to get my teeth into some American TV drama. The quality of work coming out of the States is astonishing. There’s so much of it and it’s nearly all really good. Well written, well plotted and edited. Everything.

In terms of movies, more live action please. I need a rest from the puppets!

What are you generally looking for in a director in order for you to do your job as best as possible?

All directors are different and as such, what they require from the DOP varies. Wes wants me to exactly put up on the screen what he has in his head. It is totally his vision so my role is very much reactive. With some other directors there is more of a creative collaboration, the role is proactive if you will. Neither is necessarily better than the other as long as you trust the director to bring the movie in.

What do you think a producer/director is looking for when they bring on you to DP the film?

I’d like to think that I’m the best at what I do. I have a huge amount of experience. I’m very professional and I bring on the best, most user friendly crews but essentially what a director needs is someone they can trust.

What is your passion in life besides cinematography and film?

So many. My daughters, my partner, beautiful Swiss wristwatches, restoring my 17th century house, good food, good wine , good company.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides the ones you worked on?

There are lots but probably Kind Hearts and Coronets, the first Matrix and Ferris Beuler’s Day Off. That’s just for fun. In terms of cinematography, I think Conrad Hall was a genius and I can watch Road To Perdition any day of the week.

What advice do you have for young cinematographers who would eventually like to DP movies for a living one day?

Keep learning. Watch movies, read about movies. Who do you like? Why? Think about how stuff has been made. Don’t rely on your innate talent but keep building your technical knowledge, the two together will be very useful to you. And never ever send out a CV for a camera trainee position with your name followed by the letters DOP. It goes in the bin.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Frank G. DeMarco (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, All is Lost)

It was an honor for the extremely talented DP, Frank G. DeMarco, to take some time out of his busy schedule to answer a set of questions for this interview.

https://www.frankiedemarco.com

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised?

Frank G. DeMarco: I was born in Baltimore, Maryland. After studying abroad in Italy and Austria, I moved to New York City—it’s America’s European city.

Was CINEMATOGRAPHY something you always wanted to do as your career?

I was fascinated by still cameras and had a little Super 8 movie camera as a youth, but I never thought I could make a living with either, so I got a college BA in Modern Languages. I became aware of Cinematography while studying in Florence, Italy during college. When I graduated, I discovered that there were very few jobs for linguists other than working for the NSA. Luckily, I got a gig on a tv commercial and then my life went in the best possible direction—filmmaking!

What has been your the proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project to date?

Hedwig and the Angry Inch was a big break for me and I am very proud of the work we did on it. I got to work with a brilliant actor-writer-singer-director-punk named John Cameron Mitchell. There were many pressures on us to compromise and make a lesser film, but we held on to the director’s vision and made a wonderful cult film that endures even to this day. We’ve done four films together and each one is very special in its own unique way. However, almost all of the films I have shot are my favorites—I try not to do a project unless I love the script and the director. Beerfest is my favorite comedy, Margin Call is my favorite thriller. Rabbit Hole is my favorite drama. All is Lost is my favorite adventure film. Theremin: An Electronic Odyssey is my favorite documentary. In the TV/Streaming world, I’m proud to say the first 5 episodes of Amazon’s Sneaky Pete Season 2 is the best-looking TV show I’ve shot to date.

Tell us about your working on the first season of MAD MEN. How was the creative vibe on set? Did people know they were onto something and this was going to be a special show?

With MAD MEN, the actors gave everything, the crew was top-notch and the scripts were always good. I loved Dan Bishop’s production design and the costumes were spot-on. Everyone hoped the show would get renewed for a second season, but, on the early episodes I worked on, I don’t think anyone could foresee how ground-breaking and special Mad Men was going to become.

You DP’d the film ALL IS LOST, which is a film with only one actor: Robert Redford. What was that experience like? I’m sure you haven’t had another shoot quite like that one.

All is Lost is a silent film—but with sound. I’m a huge fan of the silent films of Buster Keaton, Fatty Arbuckle, Charlie Chaplin and Harold LLoyd. Silent films are storytelling at its most basic level. I definitely used my study and knowledge of silent films to inform how I shot, lit and composed All is Lost. Working with an icon like Robert Redford was a highlight of my career. His Sundance Film Festival opened many doors for me and I got to thank him in person for that. Redford is an amazing “internal” actor—he doesn’t need words. He can convey what’s in his heart or on his mind with his face and eyes and body—he probably could have been a great silent film star, but then we would’ve been deprived of his wonderful voice!

What are you generally looking for in a director in order for you to do your job as best as possible?

It’s great to have a director that knows and likes my work! I look for directors that are collaborative and secure in their own abilities. The best directors I’ve worked with like to have ideas thrown at them. I’ve got many ideas and observations when I work on a film and it is a thrill and honor when the director incorporates some of my ideas into the film. I like a director who trusts me to light and compose the film according to the way we discussed in prep. I like a director who is willing to change everything if he sees a better way of doing a scene—and, even if it’s at the last minute and there’s no more time, I will do everything I can to facilitate that better idea. Most importantly, I like a director who is not only brilliant, but also kind and humble and generous and grateful. We’re all there to help him or her make the best film possible.

What do you think a producer/director is looking for when they bring on you to DP the film?

Producers usually want someone who is easy to get along with, won’t make waves, works fast and doesn’t cost too much to hire. Each director is so unique, but if they’ve hired me then they know they have a partner, a collaborator, a co-conspirator and friend that will help make the absolute best film possible.

What is your passion in life besides CINEMATOGRAPHY and film?

I love music: Debussy and jazz mostly. I bash away on a big 7 foot long Yamaha grand piano every day at home. When I travel I bring my sheet music and rent a digital piano for my hotel room. I enjoy cooking for people: when I filmed How to talk to Girls at Parties in England I hosted a Sunday roast for the director, producers, actors and friends every week. I still do it once in a while here in NYC. I love salt water and tides and am incredibly fortunate to have a little beach cottage on a barrier island off of Long Island, NY.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides the ones you worked on)?

I’ve lost count of the times I’ve watched the following: Godfather 1, Fargo, Clockwork Orange, French Connection, The American Friend, Breathless, Goodfellas, The Third Man, Treasure of the Sierra Madre, and Dirty Pretty Things. I live across the street from the Film Forum in NYC, so I’m in that theater at least once or twice a week in my spare time watching non-mainstream films, retrospectives (Bergman this month!) and unusual documentaries—I just saw “Andy Goldsworthy: Leaning Into The Wind”. It is transcendent!

What advice do you have for young cinematographers who would eventually like to DP movies for a living one day?

Early in your career don’t have a mortgage or kids. Have cheap rent and minimum expenses. That way you can take the job you want that will advance your career, instead of taking the job you need because you are in debt or have mouths to feed. Make friends of everyone you meet. Help others. Be positive and hopeful!

 
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PHOTO: Frankie on the set of “How To Talk To Girls At Parties” with director John Cameron Mitchell
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Tobias Datum (Imposters, Mozart in the Jungle)

tobias_datum.jpgIt was a pleasure to have the very talented Director of Photographer Tobias Datum answer some questions.

Go to his website for more information: www.tobiasdatum.com

 Matthew Toffolo: Is there a project to date that you’ve worked on that you’re most proud of?

Not really. I do love all the things I have worked on. I put my best effort into all of them.

Sometimes they turn our great, sometimes they are less successful (according to my personal opinion) but I have yet to have a bad experience making a movie (knock on wood).

What was the biggest thing you learned working on the many shorts that you DP’d?

Shorts can be a great opportunity to try things out. They have a very different rhythm from features and are less forgiving than a longer project can be. You need to find your groove on set a lot faster because the schedule is shorter and the same goes for what you are shooting.

Everything is a bit tighter and you can’t slip

What suggestions would you have for up and coming cinematographers who want to be where you are?

Just keep working.

Keep your expenses low so you can afford to take on projects that don’t pay much but are projects you feel strong about.

Be nice to everybody, stay curious and excited about the work

You have been in a unique position where you were the Director of Photography on two seasons of “Mozart in the Jungle” and the current 1st season of “Imposters”. How have those experiences been like working with different directors for each episode while being the driving force for the look and tone of the television series?

Both of those shows are pretty intimate affairs.

In both cases the majority of episodes are directed by the creators and over the now 3 years of “Mozart” we have grown into a bit of a family.

Outside directors are usually pretty good fits into the existing group. In both cases the creators of the show have a lot of control over the show and the hiring.

I have only had great experiences with the “outside” directors.

In prep the first AD will also give them a good idea of where the challenges are and we then tackle those together as a group.

Most of the time the directors will have a very good idea what the show and are there to play and all of us, cast and crew, are open to play as well.

What are you looking for in your director when working on narrative shorts or features?

Mostly whether I can imagine spending a lot of time together with that person and enjoy it.

What is a director looking for in you?

If I knew… it’s probably different every time.

Is there a project that you love to work on that you haven’t worked on yet? (genre, style etc..)

Anything Azazel Jacobs is going to make in the future.

Where were you born and raised? What becoming a successful DP something you always dreamed of doing?

I was born and raised in Frankfurt, Germany.

No one in my family worked in film or media related jobs and I also didn’t watch much TV or go to the movies as a child and young adult.

I always had jobs as a teenager and ended up being involved in a little music/theater venue. There were a few par cans and a little dimmer board there and one day a friend who also worked there asked me if I could imagine working with him and 2 other guys at a much bigger venue in the summer for an annual theater series. I said yes and I ended up working there for 3 summers.

In that period of time the audience number grew so big that they had to hire someone who was certified. I was 18 at that time. That person took me on as an assistant and introduced me to film. Somehow I liked what a DP did and started exploring anything visual. I did internships/apprentice ships at a post production, editing and animation and worked as a electric and grip and ultimately applied for film school in Berlin, Germany.

After that I went to AFI where a met a lot of people who I still friends with and work with as well.

In short it was a bit accidental and I am still learning as I try to catch up.

What film, besides the ones you’ve worked on, have you seen the most time in your life?

Perhaps Harold and Maude. Not sure. I do like american movies from that time for sure.

In general I gravitate towards older movies. Often international movies.

I really like that streaming service https://www.filmstruck.com/

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 2 times a month. Go to www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Jon Aguirresarobe

jonaguirz.jpgAfter completing his postgraduate studies at the prestigious American Film Institute (AFI), Jon has been part of the team in great productions of the likes of Twilight, Eclipse or Fright Night, among others. He currently works as a cinematographer for several fiction and publicity projects in both the United States and Latin America. It was a true honor to interview this extremely talented DOP.

http://jonaguirresarobe.com

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised? Was being a cinematographer something you always wanted to do?

Jon Aguirresarobe: I was born and raised in San Sebastian, in the north of Spain. But I moved to Madrid when I was 18 years old. I always wanted to be a painter and I pursued that dream for a bit. When I was 26 I used to work for commercials and a little pic into a narrative project make me decide to become a cinematographer. Something that was close to me, thanks to my dad, for my entire life.

What film that you DP’d are you most proud of to date?

“Hunter Gatherer” is the film that I am the most proud of. We shot it with a minimal crew and lots of love and I believe you can feel that while watching the movie. Its an incredible honest movie and it gave us so many rewards.

 PHOTO of the film “Hunter Gatherer”:

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What was the biggest thing you learned working on the many short films you DP’d? Is there a place where we can watch some of them online?

I publish some of them on my website: http://jonaguirresarobe.com/. I´d rather be on set working on set than home so I have done many shorts before starting on the feature world. I got a lot out of them. On shorts you have the chance to try things, get hours on set and you never know, maybe meet someone that you can keep working with. In my case I met Director Eric Kissack who is one of the responsables of my careers growth.

What are you generally looking for in a director to make sure you do the best job possible?

I like to see the Directors passion and commitment with the story they want to tell. See if they know what they want and if they are clear and realistic about it. I like to understand what they like and sometimes even more important, what they don´t like. I do love directors that challenge me and push me out of the comfort zone. Then, in the perfect world, I like to see that the way the director is dreaming the story is the same way I am dreaming it.

What do you think a director is looking for in their cinematographer?

I believe they are looking for a person that is capable of putting into the image the vision they have in their mind. Someone that can add a unique point of view as well. I feel like today is also important, to be fast and resolutive. I think something they also look into that.

What is your passion in life besides cinematography?

I enjoy art, photography, family, friends and my bicycles.

What cinematographers (dead or alive) would you love to have dinner with?

Rodrigo Prieto, his work is impeccable and he is capable to adapt and fit any kind of story with the most elegant and fine style. He can shoot Beautiful and Passengers and adapt himself to completely different styles. He is incredible.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides your own)?

It may be “Magnolia” from Paul Thomas Anderson. That movie motivated me to became a cinematographer.

What advice do you have for young photographers who would eventually like to be a cinematographer in the movies?

Always work towards the story you are telling. The cinematography is not always about pretty images, cinematography has to fit the script and the concept you are trying to tell the audience.

Work hard, take any opportunity to be on set and be nice, you never know who you have in front of you.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 2 times a month. Go to www.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Michael Simmonds (Nerve, Vice Principals)

Michael Simmonds is a wealth of knowledge when he chats about his love of cinematography. He is a man who is constantly looking into the future and only looking back when inspiration is needed. He is a rare talent who is able to move seamlessly from documentary to TV to feature films.  It was an honor to chat with him.

Matthew Toffolo: What are the biggest things you learn when you work on documentaries that help you when making live action feature films and TV shows?

Michael Simmonds: There are many ways to approach shooting a Verite documentary. Sometimes you need a complete and editable scene every ten minutes. Meaning, you are constantly getting CU’s, inserts and establishing shots over and over again, regardless of what is happening. Or you can approach a doc like you would going fishing–you stay back with the camera and drift around until something interesting happens and let that lead the way for the camera.

Shooting a documentary makes you figure out coverage really quickly. All storytelling needs to have shot size variation to show the audience what is “important”. Verite documentary is basically filming a live event. The people move around and interact with other people and space and you have to make visual sense out of it for the audience. In narrative you can use this technique by blocking a scene as an “event” and keeping the blocking of the actors “loose”. This works well in chaos scene with lots of people. The actors perform the “event” and the camera films the scene like a doc, meaning there is no formal shot list or “plan”.

PHOTO: Michael DP’d the landmark film “Project Nim”:

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MT: Out of all of the projects you’ve worked on, what film are you most proud of?

MS: I only focus and think about whatever I am currently prepping or shooting. I try my hardest and show up to set with all the energy and focus I can muster each and everyday. As for the final product, I often joke that I would enjoy filmmaking just as much even if the camera was never recording. The finished film is of little interest to me aside from a sense of curiosity…

As for “what of my work can I watch and enjoy”; that would be “Plastic Bag”. It’s a short film about the life of a plastic bag. It’s a lot of fun to watch and I have fond memories of making it. The filming of it involved lots of throwing bags into the air and shooting leaf blowers at them, it was ridiculous so we laughed a lot.

MT: You DP’d the entire 2nd season of Vice Principals. I heard that most scenes were improved by the actors. How is that experience working on a set where you don’t know what’s going to happen take after take?

MS: I don’t think most of the scene were improvised. It wasn’t like a Judd Apatow film where you can feel the dueling two camera set up and the actors riff off each other. VP had very tight scripts and David Gordon Green would create film level blocking. The actors definitely added to the dialgue, but not any more or less than other projects I have been involved with. On a comedy, even if the actors improvise, its in regards to dialogue and not their actual movement, so it does not effect me. I alwas operate with headphones on so I can hear the actors perfectly and I can anticipate their movement.

Photo: Danny McBride vs Walton Goggins in “Vice Principals”:

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MT: Do you have a Director of Photography mentor?

MS: I would have and currently would want a DP mentor but unfortunately I never had one. Amir Naderi was a director I worked with early on who taught me about composition and framing. He has a very sharp eye and was always pushing for a perfect take. Ramin Bahrani and I would discuss story structure endlessly and I still read Alexander Mackendrick’s “on filmmaking” every year. Understanding story is the foundation to understanding how to film a scene.

I learn more and more about lighting on every job. In my opinion lights are the hardest medium to work with. They are like painting with water color paint. You never really know what they will do. There are so many variables that will effect the way they function in the photography.

MT: What do you look for in your director?

MS: I want a good collaborator in a director, someone who is not afraid of communication. Good ideas come from lots of ideas. Although a director needs a “vision” they also need to explore all possibilities in a scene. They must be a leader and exciting, but egoless. Their decision process should not be based on fear, which is rare. Most people make decisions based on fear, which makes for a weak film. Bold choices make good films.

MT: What do you think a director looks for in their cinematographer?

MS: Fuck if I know…!

It’s a myth that directors alone choose a D.P. or make any big hiring decision alone. A director might push for someone they have worked with or they could advocate for someone they want to work with but all decisions usually have to go through a producer, financier or studio. Usually a director would be given a list of people to choose from… Of course on more “auteur” films this is not the case.

How do you get on that list that gets handed to the director is a whole other question…

MT: Ideally, how much preparation do you like to do before you begin principle photography? Do you like working with storyboards?

MS: Prep depends on the scope of a film. Nerve needed lots of prep due to the logistics of the stunt sequences. You need a storyboard since so much of that work is a “cheat” and takes place in a “fictional” space. By fictional space I mean that the space as presented on the screen does not exist in the real world. For instance a snorkel lens shot that feels “inside” Dave Franco’s helmet does not need to be filmed on park ave south. A storyboard also lets you understand what shots need the actual actors opposed to the stunt people.

A good stunt sequence is a lots of micro stories that fold into each other and those have to be mapped out.

White Girl didn’t need any storyboards since the film didn’t require cheating any spaces or stunt sequences… the front door to the protagonists apartment was actually the real front door…
A film like white girl doesn’t even require a shot list. We would block out a scene and film it as a moving master and then do some pick up shots for specific moments.

Photo: David Franco and Emma Roberts in “Nerve”:

nerve_still.jpg

MT: Where do you see the future of camera/lighting technology in film?

MS: Although there is a romance and nostalgia for film negative, digital imaging has really improved lighting for movies. We are much more comfortable with underexposing now than in the past. Of course Savidis, Khondji and Willis did great underexposing and making bold lighting choices, but now you see modestly budgeted TV shows that look bold and interesting.

Focus pullers often use large HD monitors to pull focus which has allowed for super shallow depth of field that didn’t exist when I started out.

I have no idea where imaging will be in 10 years but the technology has been a mixed blessing with lots of advantages.

Although there is a lot of new technology coming out for camera support, no one product has replaced an older one. The movi did not replace the steadicam and the steadicam did not replace the dolly… its just more tools to use.

MT: What film, besides the ones you’ve worked on, have you seen the most times in your life?

MS: Probably something like RepoMan or something culty like the Warriors. Or maybe Wong Kar-Wai’s Fallen Angels since it was such a game changer in how movies looked. I am often going back to watch Danny Boyle’s work. I truly believe he is the best populist filmmaker working right now. He isn’t scared of technology and he is keeping up with how people currently read images…. Currently I’m not interested in filmmakers that are referencing the past.

But when I am in a hotel room I like to watch something like Runaway Train.

MT: Where did you grow up? Did you always want to be a cinematographer?

MS: I grew up in Scarsdale, NY. It’s a suburb 30 mins from the city.

Most filmmakers have a romantic story about a super 8 camera etc… My history wasn’t like that. My eyes have always been super sensitive to light. I get migraines in the sun and I was always particular about lighting in rooms, even at a young age. I was strict about when a household light would be turned on and which ones. I also liked to boss my friends around…. These qualities probably lead me to my profession.

Around the age of 18 I wanted to go into filmmaking. I started out at Hampshire college but there wasn’t enough of a focus on commercial filmmaking, so I transferred to a school of visual arts and started to focus on cinematography.

Before that I wanted to be in a rock band…. But I didn’t like staying up late and carrying equipment. Little did I know that cinematographers stay up all night and have a heavy camera on there shoulder all the time!

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 10-20 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto on the last Thursday of every single month. Go towww.wildsound.ca for more information and to submit your work to the festival.