Interview with Filmmaker Julia Fullerton-Batten (1814 FROST FAIR)

1814 FROST FAIR played to rave reviews at the July 2020 FEMALE Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?
How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Julia Fullerton-Batten: I am a fine art photographer shooting story-telling projects on a wide variety of themes. As part of a major project narrating the history, traditions and customs along the Thames River (‘Old Father Thames’) I decided to recreate the 1814 Frost Fair on the Thames in London. This was an occasion when the river froze over completely and Londoners used the opportunity to celebrate on the ice. Over the years, there had been a number of Frost Fairs in the shadow of the Old London Bridge. What was not known at the time was that the 1814 Frost Fair would be the last after a new bridge was built to replace the old structure. Historically, therefore this fair is of particular significance to The River Thames’ and London history. Although brief it was reported as being celebrated exuberantly even to the extent that an elephant was led across the frozen ice.

I was excited with the thought of the project and felt a curious urge to experience the fair for myself. I always endeavour to make the settings, costumes, props, etc for my photoshoots as authentic as possible and always do a lot of research beforehand. The work for this was on an even larger scale than usual. The 1814 Frost Fair occurred prior to the invention of photography so I had to rely on paintings, sketches and newspaper reports.

The cast increased to over forty and included circus performers. I had to research for entertainment tents, costumes and props relevant to the time. Sets were constructed in a large studio in London. Attention to detail was absolutely paramount for me.

I was halfway through planning this already massive, complex stills production when I realised that I just had to film it as well. It was truly the only way to give an audience a real-life experience of the electric atmosphere of what the 1814 Frost Fair must have been like. I embarked on this filming venture with no prior experience of having directed a film of any kind.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took me quite a few months to plan the entire project, both stills and film. There was a lot of additional planning needed for the film. I shot everything in a large drive-in studio and required a day for setting up and preparing the lighting, a second day for shooting the stills and a third for the filming.

On the shoot and filming days over ninety people were involved – actors, circus performers, crew, etc. On our last day we were obliged to clear the studio of all props and lighting. We started very early and didn’t finish until after midnight – all in all it was a super long day of hard but rewarding work.

A fiddle player provides the background music, the tone of the music changes from more or less serious to playful depending on the scene. Everything had to be coordinated to make sense. Although there is a minimum of dialogue there are many different characters involved in shouting, exclaiming, exertions of arm wrestling, selling, gambling, etc. I introduced interactions at all levels – to the different circus performers (sword swallower, fire breather, contortionist, stilt walker, etc.), street events (stealing, prostitution, gambling, etc). I really wanted to bring the Frost Fair atmosphere alive, illustrating also the differences pervading at that time between the wealthy and the poor, beggars and street urchins.

3. How would you describe your short film!?

Fantastical.
Sensational.
Step in time incapsulation
Fun period piece

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Never directed a short film of any kind before it was a huge learning curve from beginning to end. I am used to working with large crews but not one of nearly 100 people. However, the biggest concerns were the significant financial implications and having enough time on the day itself. I wished that I had at least two days for filming, it would have been less stressful. However, considering all those factors I’m delighted with the end result that I achieved and the resonance that the film has received worldwide since.

I was lucky to have an amazing DOP who brought a super talented crew onboard with him, as well as the support of Big Buoy in London and Eight VFX in LA for the post-production. These factors helped make a huge difference to the final result.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

The feedback was incredible. The commentators found the settings and costumes to be convincingly authentic. Those comments made my long hours of research and months of searching and hiring activities worthwhile. In all, it seemed as though my efforts to create a vibrant, joyful atmosphere had succeeded.

There were comments that it would be a great setting for a feature film and I was flattered to be compared with the structure and composition of my film with the style of Tim Burton, a director whom I have long admired! There was also a comparison with the film ‘Orlando’, based on a novel by Virginia Woolf, directed by Sally Potter and starring Tilda Swinton and Quentin Crip, in which scenes were also set on ice. Another film that I have enjoyed for its settings and lighting.

I was surprised to learn that all admitted to not knowing about the Frost Fairs on the River Thames and that I was able to make them aware of an exciting part of London history and that even an elephant once paraded the ice from bank to bank.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

In the Mood for Love, by the Hong Kong Chinese film director Kar-Wai Wong

This is such a simple story, filmed beautifully. Each frame is atmospheric, mostly filmed at night. I get inspiration from films and especially this one. I could spend hours studying each scene, frame by frame, to enjoy the impeccable lighting.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I found it great. With one upload of the film it is super easy process to read about the festivals in one place and decide to submit to those most relevant and appealing to the film and the target audience. I was able to do it when travelling and it only takes a few seconds.

The 1814 Frost Fair film already gained many awards internationally. It is so exciting for me to read the messages when they appear in my inbox!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Hallelujah by Rufus Wainwright. What a classic, beautiful rendition of this wonderful song!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I am hooked! I would love to direct more and already have some ideas. Following on to my contact with one of the cast of the 1814 Frost Fair I will soon be shooting a project on young female contortionists and am thinking how I can again combine moving imagery with stills.

It has suddenly become an exciting new world for me. One that I’m going to enjoy exploring!

Interview with Filmmaker Imelda O’Reilly (TUMBLING TOWARDS HOME)

TUMBLING TOWARDS HOME was the winner of BEST DOC CHARACTERS at the July 2020 DOCUMENTARY Short Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Imelda O’Reilly: I have a dear friend Malcolm Adams who is an Irish actor and we wanted to create a project together. I wasn’t sure what film we would make, and I didn’t have a huge budget. The process began by interviewing him but eventually a story within the story began to unfold as we chatted about his decision to move to New York in 1989 to pursue his dream of becoming an actor.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you
to make this short?

The whole process probably took a year and a half as I decided to work with an animator Damarrius Thompson to fill in Malcolm’s backstory in New York in 1989. The animator was working on many different jobs and so it took a while to create this aesthetic element within the film.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Escaping dreams!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

I would say lack of funding. You need three things to make a film, time, money and imagination. Often you don’t have all three of these elements so in the process the lack of funding can delay finishing the film. Often you spend more on postproduction than on production so each stage in the filmmaking process can be costly. We also shot in Ireland and New York so that delayed the process of filming during the production stage.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking
about your film in the feedback video?

I absolutely love that WildSOUND takes the time to film the audience’s responses to the film. WilldSound FEEDBACK is the only festival who takes the time to visually record the audience feedback and then provide it to the filmmakers.

This is a very personal story for Malcolm Adams and not an easy one to tell so having the opportunity especially during a global pandemic to hear responses to the film is amazing. It gives you the impetus to keep going, telling impactful stories and making films.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I myself am an Irish immigrant and I wanted to explore the relationship one has to leaving and returning home. In Ireland when Malcolm immigrated a lot of Irish people immigrated because there was a lack of employment for the younger generation.

As Malcolm Adams mentions he leaves home because he felt he couldn’t pursue acting in Ireland at that time because it wasn’t a place, he felt he could experiment without failing.

He had to leave in order to embrace failing in the pursuit of his dreams. The reasons one leaves a homeland are complex, a part of me wanted to explore this contradiction.

Every time you make a choice in life you lose something, and you gain something it was the contradiction of these two opposing forces that drew me to exploring this subject matter. That combined with chasing the ghosts of one’s past is always compelling to me to explore as a filmmaker.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

My choices in film changes and I return to films for different reasons. Most recently I watched a German film titled Toni Erdman. It was about a relationship between a father and his daughter.

I’m attracted to films with interesting characters. At first this film moved slow for me but after inhabiting the lives of the characters, I kept mulling them over in my head. That is a true sign the film resonates on a deeper level.

The director was female Maren Ade. In terms of a film I’ve returned to most in my life, there is more than one. I like Sprit of the Beehive, Taxi Driver, Metropolis, Naked, The Mirror, Post Tenebras Lux because those films capture a cinema of loneliness and isolation.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings
of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I like Film Freeway, it is an excellent platform to submit your film as you post everything on the site and it makes the work of submitting your film much easier.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I have one album that I love listening to in the morning, and it’s Something Else by Cannonball Adderley. Often music reminds me of certain times in my life, and playing those songs takes me back in time.

I had three albums that I listened to while living on 8th street and Avenue B in the East Village in the late nineties. The albums were, Cat Power, The covers record, Nirvana Unplugged and Cannonball Adderley. It was a very creative time in my life, so it reminds me of all the amazing memories I had when I lived downtown in NYC. I also loved listening to The Jam, Style Council and The Cure at a different time in life.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have a feature film titled We’re the Kids in America that the screenplay was an official selection for L’Atélier Cinéfondation Cannes International Film Festival in 2018. I have a US and an Irish co-producer and hopefully we will have the opportunity to shoot it at some point in the future. In addition, I am working on a short narrative film titled Love at White Rabbit.

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Interview with Filmmaker Cate Celso (KING OF THE ROAD)

KING OF THE ROAD played to rave reviews at the July 2020 DOCUMENTARY Short Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Cate Celso: After seeing Rick perform I was impressed by his energy and how he lit up his audiences. Getting to know him and all his layers I found his personal journey inspiring and wanted to share that with others.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It was about 9 months from start to finish. Seven in pre and production, two in post.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

heartfelt journey

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

We definitely wanted to capture as much of Rick’s performances as we could so I would say sorting through 24 hours of footage/interviews to tell Rick’s story in 25 minutes was definitely a challenge to completing the film.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Smiles and gratitude. The fact that film lovers took the time to watch and comment on King of the Road was humbling. Very pleased that the film inspired the same sentiment I felt watching Rick and making the film.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I’ve always been interested in hearing people’s stories. After meeting Rick and being inspired by his resilience, his ability to juggle a day job and a passion career while overcoming such personal obstacles… living your passion as a creative while having to be in a day job that may not be creative. The balance, the strength, the focus, the inspiration to just move on through and do it – share your unique talent, your gifts- I wanted to share that inspiration with others.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

As a filmmaker I am always watching films over and over again- one of my favorites is After the Wedding directed by Susanne Bier.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I find the platform easy to use as a filmmaker. You are one step removed from the festivals itself but for convenience sake it’s easy to follow and submit.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Too many to tally which one I’ve listened to the most- currently consistently listening to Eminence Front by The Who.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes! We are currently in a modified production schedule of A Bold Journey, my next short documentary film. Hoping to be ready by summer 2021 for the festival circuit. Following the journey of Tom Bold, a 77 year old hiker, maverick and adventurer from Sonoma, CA.

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Interview with Filmmaker Takeshi Yashiro (GON, THE LITTLE FOX)

GON, THE LITTLE FOX was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the June 2020 ANIMATION Feedback Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Takeshi Yashiro: I love the original story written by Niimi Nankichi but when I was a kid, I couldn’t realize how good it was.

Since the original story is a classical children’s literature, I thought most people hadn’t been able to realize the true goodness or beauty of the story like me. So I wanted to make this short film so that audiences can discover how good and beautiful the story is.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took about 2 years to complete.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Treasured Book (I am delighted if this film would be like a treasured book of the audience.)

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

To balance the artistic aspect and the entertainment side. I wanted to include the artistic aspect that can be objectively enjoyed and also the entertainment side that makes audiences to immerse themselves in the story as well.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was glad that the audience had paid close attention to the details and felt what I wanted to express.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Many ideas were coming out and piling up little by little. The most brilliant ideas were popped up in my mind right after I woke up so I tried to sleep a lot.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

“Take Me Out To the Snowland”

This is a popular movie which represents a certain times in Japan. I watched it when I was in high school and I remembered I felt jealousy for how incredibly the movie excited the audience.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0264171/

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s so helpful to submit a movie to many fabulous film festivals easily.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?
I can’t think of anything.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I haven’t decided anything for the next one but it would be a short film. I am always thinking to challenge a feature film someday though.

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Interview with Filmmaker Piotr Sulkowski (PLAY)

PLAY was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the July 2020 DRAMA Feedback Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Piotr Sulkowski: I would like to connect with my subconsciousness

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

About two years I suppose

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Mental Rollercoaster

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Camera movements. The master shots I came up with were difficult to achieve.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Sometimes people don’t understand, but this film is for me like an experimental poem. The most important in this project was to be honest with myself. Feelings even if You touch mystery…

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I was waiting for it… writing a lot of notes… allowed myself to be lost and digging deeper and deeper… and after one night It just revealed to me. I saw it in my head almost like in cinema

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

“8 and 1/2” by Federico Fellini

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Like in Tina Turner song “Simply the best”

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

My favourite music group is “Morphine” I also like music from Sorrentino movies… and also old polish stuff like “Kryzys” and “Świetliki”

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes, feature movie is one of my biggest goal… But I dream about writing with somebody with I can share my soul and work

Interview with Filmmaker Paula C. Frías (CHICKEN)

CHICKEN played to rave reviews at the July 2020 Female Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Paula C. Frías: My friends and I were stuck in a very tedious job that felt very “groundhog day” type. And i wanted to reflect that idea.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Not long since we were a very small crew (just 3), so maybe a few weeks to find the places where we wanted to shoot and edit.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

funny and sad.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

We had so much footage it was difficult to decide what to keep and what to let go.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

They got the concept. And that´s a great feeling.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

When you want to live off of film you have to do random jobs and that was the start.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

That´s such a tough question, but probably any from Spielberg or Scorsese.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It`s such a helpful platform for a filmmaker. At the beginning you don’t know where to start, and this platform gives you a guide to follow.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Oughta know (Alanis Morrisette), without any doubt in my mind

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’ve just finished my first feature. It`s a documentary about two cloistered nuns, one being a slave from the xviith century and the other entering the convent freely from today. Quite the change of subject from “Chicken”, uh?

Interview with Filmmaker Zhang Xinwen (NEW YEARS EVE DINNER)

NEW YEARS EVE DINNER played to rave reviews at the July 2020 Female Directors Festival.

What motivated you to make this film?

:逢年过节人类对于动物的肆无忌惮的杀戮用于庆祝,根本不会顾及动物的想法和感受,人类不会一直是地球的主人,如果用人类对待动物的方法,让动物对待人类一次,看看会是什么样子。

Humans always kill animals for celebrations in customs without considering what they think and feel. However, humans can’t always be the host of the world, let’s imagine what if our roles swapped and the animals could use the same way to treat with humans?

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

这个想法是我一直想拍的,拍摄实际上在一个要拆的老家具工厂拍摄的,只能在一天内拍完,我们拍了27个小时。

This is the idea that I always want to film, in fact we took place in an old furniture shop where was about to dismantle, it could only offer us one day to film and we made it 27 hours finally.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

反思与觉醒

Reflect and be conscious

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

时间太短,很害怕拍不完。

Time is very limited that I was worried I couldn’t complete the filming

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

我很感动

I was touched

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

我觉得人类对动物的态度很糟。

I think the attitudes of humans to treat with the animals are really terrible

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

海上钢琴师

The legend of 1900

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

挺好的

Good??

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

国歌

National anthem

Interview with Filmmaker Emily DeBackere (LAUNDRY)

LAUNDRY played to rave reviews at the July 2020 FEMALE Directors Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What Motivated you to make this film?

Emily DeBackere: I made this the summer after my second year of school at Ryerson. The motivation behind it was purely to make a film with no budget in my parents backyard with a group of friends. And that’s what we did. It was my first project I felt like I had total creative freedom over without the worry of strict guidelines from school.

From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make the short?

The pre-production/filming stages took only about a month. In post, the edit took about two months of off and on revisiting the project in order to sculpt the desired narrative.

How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Artistically Introspective.

What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Probably the toughest obstacle in this project was being able to make the vision achievable with such a limited crew and budget. I am extremely thankful for the hard work that each crew member contributed to this project. Since it was only a small group of us, most of us had to take on multiple roles. This film would not have been possible without the dedication and commitment of each member.

What was your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It felt really good to have people reiterate the message I intended for the film without having to blatantly explain its reasoning in the actual film itself. This is the first festival to give me an outsider opinion on Laundry and I was relieved to hear such positive feedback on the symbolism and imagery I implied throughout the short.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I’m very much an image based type of person and that’s usually how I conceptualize most of my ideas. The very first thing I did was drew a picture of the opening shot which was of the laundry line in the middle of the field. From there I was able to conceptualize a story that justified the reasoning of why linen was hung out in the middle of no where and more importantly what purpose it served.

What film have you seen the most in your life?

I don’t think there is a specific film that I’ve ever really worshipped religiously. Despite being a filmmaker/film student I’m not that huge of a film buff. However, as of lately I’ve been enjoying the works of Terrence Malick. Specifically A Hidden Life and Tree of Life have definitely been on repeat for me.

You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I feel like, especially as a young amateur film maker, I’m not too aware of the variety of festivals out there. FilmFreeway really made it simple to research and send out my short to the festivals I felt would best fit my project. If anything I feel like it allows access to a wider bandwidth of filmmakers to easily put there film out there for other people to see.

What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Clair de Lune by Debussy. I’m sort of an old soul and when it comes to classical music I find it evokes the most emotion out of me. Of course this is not the type of music I listen to in the car or with friends but definitely when I’m writing or brainstorming. I’ve played this song on repeat probably one too many times when trying to get the creative juices flowing.

What is next for you? A new film?

Next year I will be going into my fourth year at Ryerson for film. In which, we are expected to create our thesis short film. As of right now, I’m in the midst of writing a script that I’m hoping to direct if it gets green lit by the school.

Interview with Filmmaker Loïc Andrieu (AGORIA – CALL OF THE WILD)

AGORIA – CALL OF THE WILD was awarded BEST MUSIC VIDEO at the July 2020 Experimental Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Loïc Andrieu: As a screenwriter I am working on my next feature film script LIFE LINE. This film introduces a new female hero high-concept. Jane, an enigmatic LAPD rookie, trapped into a scary police hazing ritual and forced to face her secret power to dive into death. The concept of this project has inspired the music video AGORIA – CALL OF THE WILD. In fact you should experience this music video as a proof of concept for the full length movie.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

My producer Pierre Cazenave triggered it all by introducing me to the amazing electronic music artist and producer Agoria aka Sebastien Devaud. I pitched him the concept…

From there, Agoria agreed and offered me one of the most iconic tracks of his forthcoming album Drift.

The supernatural-thriller tone of the script fits perfectly the mood of the track Call Of The Wild. The fast-paced menacing vocals of Philadelphia rapper STS complements the cold and uneasy mood created by Agoria’s industrial-tinged beats.

It was an exciting experience to collaborate with Agoria as he re-worked his track through the editing process of the video by adding powerful instrumental parts. Agoria’s inputs were priceless in terms of balance between the music video and the narrative.

The whole project took us one 18 months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

FEMALE ORPHEUS

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Los Angeles is not an easy area to shoot an ambitious project with a low budget. You must pay dozens of expensive permits. A single gunshot will cost you 200$ to rent the gun. 900$ to pay the weapon supervisor plus 3000$ to pay the permit to shoot by night in a suburb area. So you are not as free as you are in Europe to shoot with a small crew. Unions, casting, scouting, wardrobe, every aspect of a low budget movie production are a battle in LA. I guess all these rules are made to prevent the city from being overwhelmed by movie shootings. But even if you can’t be as picky as you would be in Europe, you will always find better props, a better car, or better locations than the one you had in mind because the volume of choice is way larger in every department.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

My producer Pierre Cazenave from Soldats Films and I are very proud to be part of this amazing event. We never take anything for granted and we are honoured that CALL OF THE WILD will be screened this year in front of such an authentic audience.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Call Of The Wild is a female Orpheus myth. Death is the ultimate Pandora’s box. Dealing with it calls us to face inherent fears over the unknown. Jane breaks these boundaries and unveils the mysteries of the antechamber of death. Not dead yet, but no longer alive.

The concept of a female character blessed and cursed with an Orphic power came to me through personal mythological research. I created the concept of Jane as a real-life Fury. Furies are the snake-haired goddesses of vengeance, that under earth take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

THE DEER HUNTER

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

This is the best platform ever to expose the creations of talented directors from all over the world.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

“What’s going on?” by Marvin Gaye

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I Am currently focused on writing my feature film screenplay. “LIFE LINE” inspired from the concept of the short film “Agoria – CALL OF THE WILD ».