Interview with Filmmaker/Animator Georgia Burnell (UNWOUND)

UNWOUND was the winner of BEST ANIMATION at the September 2021 Animation Film Festival.

What motivated you to make this film?

I created Unwound as my final year major project at university studying illustration and animation. As I was coming up with ideas for a film I could create, I found Amazon Prime’s Undone, and became fascinated by the use of rotoscoping to create a show that was able to integrate the main character’s internal world and reality in a way that I feel visual effects just couldn’t achieve quite as seamlessly. Watching the show, combined with my own experiences of being diagnosed with Generalised Anxiety Disorder, being overwhelmed with the pandemic, and seeing how women have been disproportionately affected by job losses throughout the pandemic, formed the main themes in the film.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

The entire film from pre-production took around ten months. As the film was for the final project for my university degree, I had to film all of the live-action footage and rotoscope it in less than three months, drawing every frame by hand. It was a challenge, but definitely showed me what I could do!

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Overwhelming plushies

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Having to film live-action footage in my house to rotoscope was difficult as I didn’t have a huge space to work with and really wanted some of the animation to be set in a city. I found though that having to be confined to only using that space helped me see how I can use animation and rotoscoping to create this strange space that sits just between fantasy and reality, where I can create whatever I can imagine with enough creative thought and innovation.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I first watched it in silence early in the morning as I was too excited to wait to see it! Even without hearing what the audience had to say I was really amazed that the animation was being watched by so many people. Watching it again and hearing what they had to say reinforced this, and I really appreciated all of their thoughtful comments!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I used to be really interested in fine art photography and the idea of compositing different images together, and have always been interested in how these images could allow me to create stories. It wasn’t until I got to university and took an illustration and animation degree that I started to look at the work of rotoscope animator Shishi Yamazaki and realized that I could make these photos move to really explore the worlds I wanted to create.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Jurassic Park, Michael Crichton is one of my favourite authors and I’d love to create a science fiction film like it!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I think it’s a really great platform to be able to connect with people from all over the world, and allows new filmmakers to have so many amazing opportunities.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Probably either tuna and avocado in a salad or pizza

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’ve just finished my first commission creating an animation for a Greek film festival which has been incredible, and I’m now aiming to start pre-production on a new rotoscoped film, written by my sister who aims to be a writer/director. So far it’s about showing the dreams and goals that have been unable to be achieved by people because of the pandemic, as a way to highlight its impact and bring hope that these dreams can maybe still be reached.

I’m also working on some commissions and developing my rotoscope animation skills, which I show on my Instagram @cosmic_illustrations

Interview with Screenwriter Anthony Ventresca (The Pirate Groom)

1. What is your screenplay about?

It is a “next generation” sequel to The Princess Bride set 25 years later.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy, Fantasy, Adventure

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

The film The Princess Bride has garnered immeasurable attention since its box office release. People have shown it to their children, to their grand children and grand parents. My screenplay re-introduces the lovable personalities of the past and weaves in a story with a new generation of quirky characters. Many references from the original are taken to build the plot. I believe that this screenplay, if brought to the big screen, would appeal to people of all sorts and they would come out in numbers.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Whimsical Fantasy

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Princess Bride

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

About 3 years.

7. How many stories have you written?

Just this one, so far.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

To pick just one song would be very difficult. But the song I have listened to the most would be Rhinestone Cowboy by Glen Campbell. I have a special needs brother who plays this song over and over again as if listening to it for the first time.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

When I initially started to write, I was using Microsoft Word. It wasn’t going very well and I was physically bound to my computer desk and writing felt like work. It wasn’t until I downloaded a screenplay app on my phone that it really started to get going. I was able to make use of any free time I had to contribute to the project, whether I was at home, waiting in my car or on a lunch break at work. I was putting my thoughts to text quicker and easier, especially the dialog.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Art, Animals, Sports and sadly the Toronto Maple Leafs. Stanley Cup this year right?

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Very easy to use and an excellent platform to browse festivals. The emails keeps my interest on a daily basis.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I live in the Niagara Region so the proximity of Toronto was a trigger. With regards to the feedback I received, it was clear that whoever read my screenplay is an authority on the industry and of the craft. Their suggestions were insightful and became quite obvious to me once they were pointed out. I immediately began editing based on the valuable feedback provided.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

In this sequel to the film “The Princess Bride”, 25 years later, a princess and a pirate join forces in an attempt to save their parents and free the kingdom from an evil tyrant.

CAST LIST:

Narration: Steve Rizzo
Leah: Hannah Ehman
Father: Geoff Mays
——

Interview with Screenwriter Brad Dude (FINDING EDEN)

1. What is your screenplay about?

The plight of migrants today is a very sad, frustrating, and surprisingly controversial story. My story asks what would happen if a group of rescued migrants found an uncharted island location to live in peace and harmony. But, like the Eden in the Bible, there is trouble in paradise. The migrants find that their ideal island is run by pirates who divide them into three camps separated by 12-foot bamboo walls: Africans, South Asians, and Arabs; and, have turned each group against each other; each believing the pirates, whom they call Isleños, are protecting them from the other groups. The captain of their rescue ship along with 30 female passengers are held for ransom by the pirates so the challenge is for the remaining crew to convince the three warring villages to help mount a rescue.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I enjoy action/adventure films with a touch of humor. I believe “Finding Eden” falls into that category.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Migration and the issues surrounding the hardships and heartaches of the people involved are worth seeing on the screen in my view.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Thought-provoking.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Goldfinger.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

It took about six months to complete the research and write it.

7. How many stories have you written?

I have written six books on leadership (still available on Amazon) and five screenplays. It was suggested by a screenwriting group that I belong to in New Orleans that it would help get “Finding Eden” noticed more if I wrote it as a novel too. I have done that and we are a couple of months away from publication.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

“Question” by the Moody Blues.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Obstacles I faced included: obtaining reality checks on the actual travel routes of migrants across the Sahara and through the Mediterranean Sea; current screenplay formatting techniques (thanks to Dave Trottier for his feedback); and, being constantly unable to stop fussing with the final version of the story.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Leadership and personal temperament. I am the co-developer of “The Basic Elements of Temperament,” a model that assists new leaders enhance self-awareness. It is the subject of several of my books and I conduct workshops on it.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

This was the first time I entered and was pleased with the results.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Until you hear someone actually speak the lines you wrote, it is often difficult to see if you hit the mark or not. I wanted to experience that and felt extremely happy with the feedback I received.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

“Captured along with 30 female asylum-seekers by modern-day pirates on a remote utopian island, Captain Anna Kruger struggles to escape while her rescue ship’s crew attempts to unite warring African, Arab and Asian villages to mount a rescue.”

CAST LIST:

Narration: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Chike: Bill Poulin
Desta: Geoff Mays
Kruger: Hannah Ehman
——

Interview with Screenwriters Judd Cherry & Aaron Krebs (THAT’S OUR SHOW)

NOTE: Answered by Judd Cherry

1. What is your screenplay about?

– A hopeful group of comedy upstarts travel the country performing and grinding out a name for themselves, all while surfing the bonds of friendship and facing the trials and tribulations of that touring road life.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

– Comedy

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

– That’s Our Show is a TV pilot script but Aaron and I think the world of touring performers and the college activities market is wholly unexplored in TV and Film. Not only is it an entertaining universe in real life, but the characters you meet at every turn make this an arena that deserves to be see not just by the people who live in it.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

– Funny. Bonkers.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

– Trading Places. Star Wars. It’s a very long list

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

– Aaron and I first came up with the idea back in 2018 when we both happened to be in Europe at the same time. We met for wine and the ideas started flowing. This one is a world that both he and I have worked in for a long time so we felt it was a perfect foray for us to partner on.

7. How many stories have you written?

– Tons. I’ve been writing for most of my life so I couldn’t really give you a hard number. Same goes for Aaron. We’ve both been working in entertainment and making things since college and before.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

– Currently I’m on The Fratellis and can listen to Henrietta over and over.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

– Covid definitely had an impact as we would normally meet in person for a few hours a week to write and doing that virtually wasn’t easy. Prior to the pandemic the biggest obstacle was figuring out the world we were creating and how far we wanted to stretch an already unique and wild reality. We went back and forth on a few things to get the script into what we believe is a great place.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

– I love filmmaking, directing, and being creative. I’m also a collector of vintage toys and comics so that’s a dangerous passion to have. Aaron loves entertaining and creating. He also has become an expert in wine over the years that I’ve known him and know he’s passionate about that. And I can say with certainty that he’s passionate about raising his daughter to be a great human being, which I can attest to.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

– With any submission site there are always small things here and there but I’m generally very happy with everything that FilmFreeway has made available.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

– When we finished the script and show bible, Aaron and I wanted to find good outlets for exposure while we try to set the show up. I was in LA for 19 years until recently and Aaron is still there so getting the script into LA based fests and competitions was high on our priority list. Yours is established and we were psyched to get the feedback we did and honored to receive the accolades.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

A hopeful group of comedy upstarts travel the country performing and grinding out a name for themselves, all while surfing the bonds of friendship and facing the trials and tribulations of that touring road life.

CAST LIST:

Narration: Hannah Ehman
Otis: Sean Ballantyne
Margot: Kyana Teresa
Javi: Bill Poulin
Kevin: Steve Rizzo

———–

Interview with Screenwriter Stacy Dymalski (A BIT MUCH)

1. What is your screenplay about?

My story is about self-acceptance, even if you don’t fit “the norm,” so that you can confidently step into the best version of yourself.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy, dramedy, fantasy, female-driven

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

So that people, particularly women, can see that it’s okay to be bold, outspoken, and live unapologetically outside of the lines of conformity. Plus, this screenplay has three fantastic roles for older female actors, which serves an audience demographic that is sorely lacking.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Forgiveness and Acceptance

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Wizard of Oz (I watched it over and over as a kid, and several times as an adult)

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

At least 15 years. The story weaves together several stories of my past that I’ve used in my comedy routines and comedy blogs (I’m a comedian).

7. How many stories have you written?

Hundreds–If you count books and magazine articles I’ve written, plus my blog posts, comedy routines, speeches, screenplays and teleplays.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

September by Earth, Wind, and Fire

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

It was hard to determine where and how to end the story. The story in the screenplay is based on my life—which is an ongoing story.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

My family, my friends, my dog, music, travel, the beach, hiking remote trails

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It was easy as pie. Everything worked as expected.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I researched several festivals and screenplay contests and I was impressed with the level of quality of past winners in this one. And after my screenplay became one of those esteemed winners, I was extremely impressed with the feedback and notes I received. There is one suggestion in particular that I’m very excited about, and I plan to address it in my next rewrite.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

After being told her whole life she’s “a bit much,” an outspoken middle-aged woman has an existential crisis when a first date asks her, “Do you want red or white wine?” Unsure how to answer, she retreats to the restroom in embarrassment, where both sides of her psyche recount her past to help her determine if authenticity is a plus or a minus when it comes to new relationships.

CAST LIST:
Narration: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Waiter: Andy Camp
Robert: Geoff Mays
Marlene: Kyana Teresa
——

Interview with Screenwriter Janet Oh (WOOSUNG 2020)

1. What is your screenplay about?

“Family Day” introduces Victoria Im, a second-generation Korean American woman, struggling to attain recognition for her artistic pursuits. But when a tragic event gives her an opportunity to catapult her into worldwide recognition, she must carefully weigh her options. After all, the opportunity would require her to re-enter her greatly powerful chaebol extended family.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Drama

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This idea was born from my love of Netflix’s The Crown and other British period dramas that featured aristocratic families. For years, I’ve deeply admired their writing, acting, and production qualities, and wanted to emulate their styles in the hopes of being seen as a more serious writer due to my internalized belief that my Korean American identity was an obstacle instead of an asset. However, thanks to more Asian representation in Hollywood these past couple of years, I began to want my people in the things I like. Thus, Woosung, named after the cram school business my mother opened during her mid-20s in South Korea, was born. I also believe this screenplay should be made into a movie because I know there are capable Korean American actors out there who will resonate with the messages of my screenplay, and I want to create an opportunity for them to really utilize their talents to perform a story they’re passionate about.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Crackling. Intricate.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Doctor Who’s “The Day of the Doctor”

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

One year.

7. How many stories have you written?

13.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

“Fox Rain” by Lee Sun Hee

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I started writing this screenplay at my parents’ house during lockdown. After being away from home during college, there was definitely a lot of deep reassessment of my relationship with my parents, all while doing a full-time job remotely and working on an MFA application at the same time. So, trying to figure out Victoria’s character was challenging and required a lot of self-reflection. But the more I came to understand myself and my journey up to this point, the more I was able to flesh out Victoria’s character.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love teaching literature to young students and helping them to become more intelligent readers.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It’s a great site to easily discover festivals you might not have heard about and that could really be beneficial to you. I’ve had a good experience so far and have recommended this site to all my writing friends.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The reviews were a great motivator for me. As a writer at the beginning stages of her craft/career, I thought this would be a great opportunity for me to have someone outside of my circle give me feedback.

The feedback was exactly what I needed. I was surprised that the reader had connected with my piece as a lot of the story and characters came from my personal experiences and the stories I heard from my immigrant parents. From my experience, I’ve had readers who were not aware of the societal context of my scripts. So, it meant a lot to me that the reader had this knowledge and understanding as it’s something that would be extremely helpful for writers of color. The constructive criticism was also very spot on, and I was able to finish another draft very recently because I knew what I needed to improve on.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

This script is a greatly structured story about the challenges of someone who isn’t familiar with her culture and is trying to integrate herself into it. Dealing with that while also being appointed CEO makes for a story with high stakes. Mixing the chaebol culture with an Americanized protagonist makes the story relatable and accessible for those who are unfamiliar.

CAST LIST:

Narration: Steve Rizzo
Justin: Bill Poulin
Tae-Min: Sean Ballantyne
———–

Interview with Filmmaker Shawna Schultz (REMEMBERING MARTY CHERNOFF)

REMEMBERING MARTY CHERNOFF played to rave reviews at the September 2021 LGBTQ+ Documentary Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I was asked to do some interviews and put together a 10-minute tribute to Marty after he passed away. As a filmmaker, the more I interviewed and the more I learned, I simply fell in love with Marty’s story and the film grew into a half hour documentary.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

It had to be fast because it was initially for his memorial service. I did the research and interviews and the first cut in 3 months, then, we raised some funds and finished the cut to the current state to make it more accessible to the public in about 4 more weeks.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Unlikely ally

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Mostly just the time constraints and funding. I wish I could have spent more time in the edit room and had longer interviews with some of the subjects. It initially wasn’t meant to be a full doc, but we just felt the world needed to hear Marty’s story, so we had to work with what we had. I ended up getting about 27 interviews.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was touched to hear how people related and liked Marty’s story. I’m excited that people liked it because of what I’m up to next.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

All the way back when I got my first camera for my 11th birthday. My mom put it on layaway and I made all kinds of films through middle school and high school, ultimately going to film school.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably Snatch and Groundhog Day are tied.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Works smoothly!

9. What is your favorite meal?

There is a special place in my heart for Pho.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m in development for a narrative feature based on this documentary about Marty Chernoff. I’ve gotten the family’s blessing and a full script, and we’re now in the process of getting it funded to shoot in 2022.

Interview with Filmmaker Sam Luna (MEMORIES OF GREEN)

MEMORIES OF GREEN played to rave reviews at the September 2021 DRAMA Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

“Memories Of Green” was really motivated by the deep seeded issues I had with my father growing up. I wanted to make a film to sort of cope with trauma if you will. So it’s almost like a love letter to all sons who wanted to be closer to their Dad. I know my grandfather was the same way to my father, so it also becomes a perpetual cycle from generation to generation. We also shot it on the golf course that my father grew up on, playing with our grandfather. So that was very special to us.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

From start to finish it took about 6 months from it’s conception to fruition. We had planned out every single shot and had made a map of how to most efficiently shoot from section to section to maximize golden hour light. It took about 6 days of shooting.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Generational disconnection.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle was figuring out the music I’d say, working side by side with the composer to get cues right, cuts synced, mood or tone of song. It was difficult to go back and forth to figure that out.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

My initial reaction was “woah these people actually watched it”! I think at least from the feedback video people really understood what we were going for. As one viewer said it’s circular, it starts with a sunrise and ends with a sunset. Much like life itself.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I started making music videos in 2017 and really had no idea what I was doing. I’ve always loved movies and had two brothers who went to film school, so I pretty much learned everything from them. I realized I really wanted to make films at the start of the pandemic, when there was nothing else to really do. I felt like I was capable, now that I had made so many small videos and worked on production sets. I had a better idea of the overall world and art form.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The film I’ve seen the most in my life is either “The Mighty Ducks 2 – D2” or “Home Alone” and that is the absolute truth.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I think the platform is great because it gives more people a chance to get their work out there. There’s always pros and cons. Things may be a bit more saturated but in the end, it’s better that film is becoming more accessible and affordable to the working class if you will.

9. What is your favorite meal?

My favorite meal is Korean BBQ!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Our next film is entitled “Destiny”, it’s actually complete. We’ve sent it out to Sundance so far, so fingers crossed. It’s a fictional PSA style, where there is 3 characters talking into camera, from 3 different classes. It was a blast to make and it’s something that we’re very proud of.

Interview with Filmmaker Lenny Lenox (THINGS I SHOULD HAVE SAID)

THINGS I SHOULD HAVE SAID played to rave reviews at the September 2021 LA Feedback Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I love films that inspire you to learn from their message. While thinking about this story I drew from experiences in my life and created characters that could remind us of lessons learned and lessons taught from those that we may have looked up to without knowing their flaws and failures in life. It’s always important for us to be reminded that it’s okay to fall just as long as we get back up every time. That when we are truly honest with ourselves is when we find that moment of balance that most of us are searching for in life. The characters in this story are examples in my opinion about our connection to one another and how we can bring the best out of each other.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this film?

I finished the first draft of the feature in January 2020 and submitted it to a few screenplay competitions. I also had some former colleagues, classmates, friends and family read it too and I received great coverage notes back. When I was notified that we had made it to the 2nd round of the Austin FIlm Festival, I made the decision to take some scenes from the feature and create a proof of concept showcasing the two main characters’ (Rhett & Bobby) introduction to each other. In October 2020 we shot the proof of concept and completed post production on Christmas Eve, December 2020.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Honest and Hopeful

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

During pre-production the biggest obstacle was the weather that was messing with the logistics of the shoot. It was the beginning of October and we were right at that sweet spot in North Carolina where the leaves were still green, but getting closer to fall colors. Peak leaf usually comes in the 3rd week of October and I really wanted to have more green in the shots to present a spring/summer day more than a fall day because in the script it’s more near the beginning of the year when Rhett runs into Bobby being bullied in a fight after school. Leading up to the shoot a hurricane made landfall in the south that was pushing rain our way in NC and made the forecast very unpredictable. On top of that our co-producer Gary Blake was in California ready to board a plane to make it for the weekend shoot. Sure enough a couple of days out from the shoot I had to push the shoot due to weather and thankfully everyone involved was able to be available for the reshoot including Gary who luckily enough I had booked a ticket with an airline that allowed us to move the date free of charge. If we wouldn’t have got the proof of concept in the can on that first week of October I would have most definitely had to wait until spring of 2021 to shoot.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Gratitude was my initial reaction to the feedback. To hear people’s thoughts that I had no relation to in any way and to hear and see these people in a video that they wanted to see this piece as a feature just made me so grateful to find that there is a place in this very overcrowded big budget superhero blockbuster era for a movie that focuses on us as people, the conversations that we have, and the problems that we have to find answers to. This film is about loss, redemption, forgiveness and family among other themes such as substance abuse and bullying which made it difficult to pick what the main theme for the proof of concept would be. Overall it’s about connection and for the audience to relate to Rhett and Bobby’s connection without knowing their backstories and wanting to see more was very gratifying.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

It was in a theater watching movies when I was inspired to pursue filmmaking and dreamed that I could hopefully do the same for someone else one day. I absolutely love the dark auditorium sitting with others with no distractions viewing a movie on that big screen. I was about 19 or 20 years old and I had recently finished some summer classes on film at a local college in Tampa, FL and enjoyed going to the movies every weekend with my buddy. I come from a sports background and the team atmosphere with the pursuit of achieving a goal is something I have always been most attracted to. After competitive sports had ended for me I noticed more and more filmmaking had those same qualities and I thought that this could be a way for me to live out my dreams and achieve goals. In some regards I made my dreams come true through my days as a freelance filmmaker and it was always great to be able to learn something new on set on every production I worked on. To this day I am drawing from those lessons as I make this transition into producing and directing.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Wow. This is a tough one, but I’m going to go with Rocky. It’s by far one of those movies that speaks to me every time I watch it. I relate to the underdog a lot in life and Rocky has all the elements. The hopelessness, the opportunity, the belief, the hard work, the realization and yet still have the perseverance to go the distance that Rocky goes through is just so inspiring. Just thinking about it makes me want to put it on now!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I love FilmFreeway! They have made it so simple for filmmakers to put together an EPK for festivals to view. I’m sure it’s easier for the festivals to organize as well. To be able to create a profile for yourself and for each project I think helps festivals get to know the filmmaker much better as well. I enjoyed being able to really read about each festival I have submitted to, how long they’ve been programming the festival, and having direct links to further your search. I think it has really improved the way filmmakers can get their films out there to be seen. The Watch List, the notifications/emails, direct announcements to social media platforms are all great qualities of the site.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Hands down it’s sushi which is pretty ironic considering I had to be coaxed to try it at first. I’m a specialty roll kind of guy and love trying new takes on rolls however I will always have a rainbow roll and some salmon roe with my order every single time!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Hopefully what’s next is the feature of Things I Should Have Said. I would love to get this picture greenlit and into production, find distribution and watch it with the audience in a theater. Together with my creative partner and producer/director, Gary Blake, we look forward to bringing movie lovers many different types of films that range from sci-fi, fantasy, horror, comedy and maybe even a big budget blockbuster that we could present through Pale Blue Pictures. As of now we will keep developing these projects that have the scripts written, pre-pro on more potential proof of concepts/pitch decks and be as ready as we possibly can for when the time comes that these projects get the opportunity to go to the next level. I’m just going to keep working at it day by day and I have to keep believing in myself and the stories! To date I have gotten a lot out of filmmaking on so many different levels in life and am always excited about not knowing what’s around the corner or who I’m going to meet next. I love collaborating, creating and it is always a thrill to see a project go from script to screen! I’d like to thank you LA FEEDBACK FILM FESTIVAL for all that you have done in supporting Things I Should Have Said!

Interview with Screenwriter Edward Dorsey (HUGS NOT DRUGS)

1. What is your screenplay about?

My screenplay is about a goofy and chronic screw up father that accidentally ends up with a briefcase full of cocaine. He then has to figure out how to return the drugs while avoiding the cops and the cartel all before picking his kids up from orchestra practice.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Action/ comedy

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This screenplay offers a ton of laughs with some heartfelt moments and action. It would be the perfect date night movie.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Slapstick Ozark

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Probably a few good men.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

It took about four months to outline and write but I’ve been tinkering with it here and there for about a year.

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written two original pilots and two spec scripts.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Six feet under the stars by all time low.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I had trouble figuring out how to end it on a cliffhanger. I originally extended the final scene but ended up cutting it so it came full circle from the beginning teaser. I was really happy with that.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I love hockey. Lately it’s been hard to watch since I’m a devils fan but this year is going to be a good year for sure.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

I’ve had a really good experience. Submitting is always really simple and I can easily track how each submission turned out to see if I’m improving.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

It was the perfect festival for my script in terms of genre and I knew the feedback was really going to help me step up the script.

My feedback was really good. There were some minor changes that I’m really glad were caught and some major suggestions that I was really excited to include.

I really want to thank you for including me in this festival. It was so exciting to be selected.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

A bumbling father trips and falls into the middle of a drug deal. The cartel and police are after him, but he still has to pick his kids up from orchestra practice.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Val Cole
Jerry: Geoff Mays
Sheldon: Steve Rizzo
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