Interview with Actor/Writer/Producer Margarita Zhitnikova (2 WEEKS)

2 WEEKS played to rave reviews at the January 2021 LGBTQ+ Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

Margarita Zhitnikova: Understanding that I’m asexual was a very scary experience for me. I didn’t want it to be true because I was afraid it meant I’d never be good enough for society as we live in an incredibly sex-driven world. In my opinion, one way to remedy that is to spread awareness and representation. We are so much more than who we fuck, how often we fuck and how “sexy” we are.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

MZ: I think it actually took us about 2 years! I really thought it would be done much faster but after completing the film (color, sound, everything!) we had to do a pick-up shoot and start post all over again.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

MZ: surreal, honest

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

MZ: I underestimated just how little people knew about asexuality. When we first shot the film, the script was less on the nose. There was less dialogue about what asexuality is and my character never said “asexuality” because she still didn’t have the words for it – much like I didn’t when I started realizing my sexual attraction to others would never arrive. I didn’t want to make another coming-out story but this felt different since I’ve never seen one on this topic. I’m really happy with how the film is now with the additional footage though. It also completely changed the structure of the film. The dinner scene at the top used to close it out!

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

MZ: I cried. I had goosebumps. I hugged my screen and texted the link to our team. I can’t thank you enough!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

MZ: I was really inspired by Get Out and Mother. I loved the way those films to externalize the horror that the characters are constantly facing on the inside. I knew I wanted to use similar elements to share what it feels like to have no control over how you are perceived by those around you.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

MZ: Really putting me on the spot!!!! I don’t rewatch films much anymore in general because there is soooo much content and I want to see it all but I used to watch Harry Potter films ALL THE TIME. They were my escape. It’s a fucking shame that JK Rowling has turned to be transphobic.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

MZ: Wellll it’s a whole lot better than withoutabox was! I could barely figure that one out. FilmFreeway is much more user friendly, however, it can still be difficult to tell which festivals are legitimate. One festival I attended that was absolutely horrible to the point where it was featured in a prominent publication as one of the scammiest festivals still has great ratings and all of the negative reviews are hard to find on FilmFreeway. Be careful filmmakers, do your research! Generally, if you reach out to someone that’s had a project at a festival to ask their experience, they’ll give you a few minutes of their time.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

MZ: Piece of Me by Triple Threat and a lot of Blue Oyster Cult and Thin Lizzy songs as well.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

MZ: Oh so many things! Triple Threat, where I play the role of Maggie – an unstoppable self-starter who creates a musical with her best friend – is set to be released this year. I got to make it with my best friend and production company partner Stacey Maltin who co-wrote and directed it as well. My short film Appetite (trailer) starring Jeffrey Weber, Jordan Bayne, Sibyl Santiago and myself, directed by Stacey Maltin is about to start it’s festival run. Jeffrey and I co-wrote Zasha, a vegan horror short, which has been garnering nominations at awesome festivals, that we are now turning into a feature-length. My award winning short film JONES (trailer) is finishing off its festival run. And I recently began virtually studying at Lesly Kahn’s studio to continue growing as an actor. Also shouting out that director Victoria Negri will soon be shooting her 2nd feature film ULTRA! You can catch her first film GoldStar on most streaming platforms. All of our team members are doing cool things. If you want to keep up with us, please follow on the socials and subscribe to the Besties Make Movies biweekly newsletter (http://eepurl.com/gvpk0r)!

Instagram (production company) @bestiesmakemovies (actor/writer/prodcuer) @marzapproved (director) @victorianegri (producer/editor) @staceymaltin (actor) @analine_ignacio (producer) @jschwartz00 (producer) @scarrrie (cinematographer) @j.coyote (costume designer) @madeincorreia
Twitter (production company) @bestiesmovies (actor/writer/producer) @marzapproved (director) @goldstarfilm (producer/editor) @staceymaltin (producer) @JSchwartz00 (producer) @carrie_radigan
Facebook (production company) @bestiesmakemovies (actor/writer/producer) @mzhitnikova (producer/editor) @staceymaltin
Vimeo (production company) @bestiesmakemovies (actor/writer/producer) @margaritaz (director) @victorianegri (producer/editor) @staceymaltin
Youtube youtube.com/channel/UCh-8V5vlrulFTj_SWGGygmw

Interview with Filmmaker Alejandro Fanzago (THE GRIN OF EVIL)

THE GRIN OF EVIL was awarded BEST FILM at the January 2021 FAN FICTION Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I’ve been cosplaying the Joker for several years now and the idea of taking it to the next level was always there. What would it be like watching the most faithful comic adaptation of the character aside from the movies? One true to the character we all love from the comics. So that was the trigger. It’s not about watching a new version but to see him coming out of a comic page to the big screen.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took us almost two years to get it done. Making the practical props and devices such as the Jack-in-the-box and the ‘Grin of Evil’ sign was the longest part. And then the post-production process was a challenge too. What a journey!

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

No-Joke

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Well, definitely the biggest was the whole post-production process. We spent most of the time trying to animate the background through a green screen because something we couldn’t quite solve on set was the reason the film was delayed. And I would really like to thank Cheby (Sebastián Contreras) who helped us finishing it!

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I’m thrilled! It’s amazing to see how they feel about it because it’s exactly what we intended. It’s a great achievement and it sure encourage us to keep on creating. Thank you all!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Frankly, creating a Joker series was something I’d always envisioned. But in order to make it happen, we needed a teaser trailer first to show the audience what we had in mind. I knew it had to be something quite different, something new. Something intriguing too, by showing without really showing too much. So the idea of a Joker atmosphere came up and we knew that was it.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I would say Star Wars and of course all the Batman films.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective? /

I think it’s a fantastic tool! It helps us sharing our work worldwide plus it’s easy to use. I would definitely recommend it!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Well I don’t really know if there’s only one song. I mean I can listen to some classical music songs, maybe some jazz or even Eminem. I guess it depends on what I’m creating at the moment!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes, we have some more projects up our sleeve. Some of them are Joker related, and some others are completely original ideas. We are very excited about them and hope to be able to make them and share them with you all soon!

Interview with Screenwriter Malathi Vulupala (FORGOTTEN VOICE(S))

1. What is your screenplay about?

It is about a girl who was betrayed by her soulmate and what she does to come out of that depression even though it takes up good part of her life and how she puts her life together.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Drama

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This accounts the state of a girl when betrayed by her lover and shows how she puts her life together.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

focus and persistence

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

all movies just once

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

2 years

7. How many stories have you written?

This is the first one. One more is complete and working on third

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Mostly with classical music and with good beats.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Giving a reasonable occupation for the lead role while finishing as she is very much career oriented as a student.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Costume designing and editing

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It was good and easy to submit.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

This being my first screenplay, my mentor asked me to get feedback so that I can improve myself. I was able to get good feedback which helped in completing the screenplay

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

A young innocent girl trusts her first love too much and pays the ultimate price when he betrays her, and must decide if she can move forward and trust in love again.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Allison Kampf
Adithya: Shawn Devlin
Padmini: Kyana Teresa

Interview with Writer/Producer Steven G. Farrell (Mersey Boys: A Letter from Al Moran)

Mersey Boys: A Letter from Al Moran played to rave reviews at the January 2021 FAN FICTION Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

The film is based upon my self-published novel, “Mersey Boys.” I published the novel in 2013 under my own Celtic-Badgers Publishers imprint. I published earlier versions: The Scousers in 1995 and Liverpool Roared in 2010.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It has taken me thirty years on this project. I started working on the first draft of the novel in 1989. Besides the three versions of the novel, I have also written a stage play and a screenplay based upon the storyline. A stage reading was held at Greenville Technical College during the winter of 2016. The screenplay was rewritten by two other writers before the final script we used in the film was written by Paddy Murphy in 2017.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Liverpool dream!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle was finding somebody with a full production company who shared my dream of making a picture based upon my book. Paddy Murphy of Celtic Badger Media Films-Ireland was that person. We only met online because we both shared the same Celtic Badger label. Emails led to a conversation via computer. Finally, I flew over to Ireland to film in October of 2017.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was so delighted I started to cry. Gently, not hysterically. I viewed the movie with an audience of around seventy people in April of 2019. It was the official world premiere for Mersey Boys: A Letter From Al Moran. Daniel Hartwell, promoter of The Beatles on the Beach International Festival, invited me to screen the film inside of the Beautiful Crest Theater in Delray, Florida. Afterwards I received a bear hug from Tony Bramwell, the producer of several of the Beatles’ songs.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I visited Liverpool, England, in March of 1989, and I took a bus tour of the Beatles’ Liverpool made me want to project myself into their story.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I have watched A Hard Day’s Night fifty times since I saw it at the Orpheum Theater in my home town of Kenosha, Wisconsin when it was released in 1964.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I think this platform is outstanding. It is a true asset to the filmmaker.

9) What are your plans? Another film?

I would like to see “Mersey Boys” as a feature-length film. It is my dream to shoot in Liverpool, England, in places connected with the Beatles. It is my desire to get in as many survivors of that time period as possible-members of the old Mersey Beat bands-to be in the film. It would be great to have Paul McCartney play the part of a professor at the Liverpool Art College, where John Lennon attended classes. I’d love to have Ringo Starr play a worker on the famous Liverpool ferry boat. I want to produce to movie as an open love letter to the city of the Liverpool, the city’s wonderful musical tradition and the Beatles!

10) What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

That’s easy: In My Life BY John Lennon and the Beatles.

Interview with Writer/Producer/Actor Ashley Sutton (THE NEW OLD FASHIONED)

THE NEW OLD FASHIONED played to rave reviews at the January 2020 Female Filmmakers Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

Being a huge fan of film, I’ve always noticed there are certain female stories that aren’t discussed on camera. Often these stories are also things we look down on in society. I have seen a lot of female friends struggle with pregnancy in many different ways. I have seen a lot of friends struggle with not finding a mate. I want all women to know that our stories and problems are important. Hopefully this will help soften the stigma around this issue.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I had this idea years ago and wrote a very rough version of it. After talking to various women I admired, I wanted to look at the story differently. Brigid came on board and we shaped “The New Old Fashioned” into what you are seeing today.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Self Empowerment

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest struggle was finding the perfect person to play the Dad. We saw a bunch of audition tapes and while all the actors were great they didn’t have what we needed. We were finally introduced to Bruce and he is such a fantastic actor. He was able to portray the deep father/daughter bond and how easily that can switch based on his judgements.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

My initial reaction was that everyone noticed all of the little things that were important to us in the writing process. From the brother and sister relationship to Ted being the most unconnected but at the same time the most connected. The audience seemed to see what we were originally thinking.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

This was an idea that came to me after talking to a friend that was having a hard time getting older and not having found a mate yet. I felt like it needed to be said that everyone’s journey is different and sometimes it isn’t what you expected.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Grease and for some reason Hunger Games Mockingjay. If it’s on, I watch it!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is really easy and I thought it was helpful in all the areas I needed assistance.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

This is such a hard question. To be honest, I listened to Taylor Swift on repeat. I do it because I love her as an artist but the music itself puts me in a good mood.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Good Boy Treat Productions is currently working on two new films. One is in pre-production and the other is still in the script writing phase.

Interview with Filmmaker Julia C. Liu (DRIVING WHILE BLACK MAGIC)

DRIVING WHILE BLACK MAGIC played to rave reviews at the January 2021 Filmmakers Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I met the story creator, Vatic Tayari Kuumba through a mutual friend at an art show in Providence, RI where we live. He is a visionary playwright, and I was looking for a story to develop into a film. We quickly discovered we are both interested in making weird art from an anti-racist lens.His writing is so vivid, it jumps out as something that should be on screen. We teamed up to develop one of his plays into a short film, creating a cinematic experience that drops the viewer into the universe of Providence Plantations, an alternate near future similar to our own. Folks who live outside of RI may not know our official state name was the “State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations” up until November 2020, when we voted to drop the Plantations part. Very long overdue.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

One year from start to finish, with a long six month pause in between.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

subversive surrealism

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Figuring out when to trust my instincts, when to listen to others, and when to take a break and come back tomorrow is still something I’m learning.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

The feedback was very thoughtful and specific. I felt like the audience members watched the film closely, and one person even watched it more than once! That is probably one of the best compliments you can get as a filmmaker- when someone finishes watching and then watches it again right after.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea was based on the first scene of a play written by Vatic Tayari Kuumba, who was my collaborator on this film.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I had Little Shop of Horrors on VHS when I was a kid and have probably watched that over a hundred times. As an adult you realize how disturbing it is, but I think I would still find it entertaining. The songs are great.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It was very easy and streamlined to submit through FilmFreeway.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I don’t have a good answer for this and I feel like people are going to be super judgemental about it no matter what. So I’ll just say in the last year, I’ve listened to Tierra Whack’s song “Unemployment” a bunch. The music video is amazing.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m a Director but also work as a Director of Photography. I’m DPing a short sizzle for a comedy series next week for a director that I really like.

Interview with Filmmakers Catherine Fridey & Catharine Jones (SEAGULL)

SEAGULL played to rave reviews at the Female Filmmakers January 2021 Festival.

Catherine Fridey (co-producer/actor/writer)
Cat Jones (director/co-producer/actor)

1. What motivated you to make this film?

Catherine: I was born in France and raised in the U.S. Growing up, I heard a lot of stories about what my family endured during World War Two, and some of the story was inspired by what they went through.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Catherine: It took me a few days to write the first draft.
Catherine and Cat: The shoot itself from start to finish lasted about 3 months. Principal photography was one day, but set design and taking it down was split into two days.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Catherine and Cat: Female espionage.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Catherine: We only had the location for shooting for one day, so we had to complete principal photography in that amount of time. The shoot day was about 14 hours.
Cat: Making the film on a shoestring budget.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Catherine and Cat: Very pleased with the constructive and positive feedback about the different aspects of the film (acting, cinematography, production design, editing, sound design).

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Catherine: As I mentioned earlier, my family’s experiences living through World War Two in France.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Catherine – The Lord of the Rings Trilogy
Cat – The Dark Knight

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Catherine and Cat: Submitting on FilmFreeway is a very convenient and painless process.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Catherine – Ramble On by Led Zeppelin
Cat – Starman by David Bowie

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Catherine – I am focusing more on writing right now, and have feature scripts and two series in the hands of producers and managers.
Cat – I am in development working on adapting an historical fiction novel into a limited series.

Interview with Filmmaker Samantha Soule (SHED)

SHED played to rave reviews at the January 2021 Female Filmmakers Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I have lived my entire professional life as an actress in front of the camera and on stage. I have always loved the experience of dissolving into a character. Bringing to life something someone else has imagined. It is an incredible gift to be on the team required to tell stories.

This past spring, my 40th birthday coincided with Covid hitting our shores. For the first time in 20 years the hustle and race of life as a freelancer was abruptly stopped. As frightening and unknown as the future seemed- it also felt like a chance to reassess, consider, take stock… to change.

I enrolled in classes on line. I busted out my camera. I started writing. Was terrible. Got into online writer’s groups. Read other’s work. Watched other’s films. It felt like… starting a garden. Cutting back overgrowth, clearing the soil. Starting the process of adding new nourishment. All in an attempt to expand. To grow. To change. To embrace this time as a chrysalis… to allow disintegration of my old self and evolve.

This film was made during that time. I didn’t have the money or access to a rental film camera so we shot it on my old Nikon. We had no budget. We had no crew. We strapped my tripod to the back of my truck and filmed around our homes and in our tiny rural town. A rainstorm rolled in and we adapted. We wrapped the camera in plastic and kept filming. The rainstorm flooded the river and my tripod legs weren’t long enough so we adapted, I went in handheld- Kim and I both shuddering and laughing in the freezing river. Kim had to get to work, we raced her back and I recorded the VO myself with a mic in my garage. All the while thinking “We can fix it in post! I can stabilize the footage or clean up the audio.. I can have Kim re record it properly…”

But once I cut the film together there was something… right about all it’s rawness. It’s imperfections. That the VO is both her inner voice, and another’s, a watcher of her process. That voice is both hers and mine.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I wrote the script three days before we filmed. The idea and text for the VO came at 1am the night before we were set to film. We shot all the footage in a single afternoon, masked, socially distant. I then worked on the edit for another handful of weeks. All told I think from idea to our picture lock was about a month.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Tender. Brave.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle to completing this film was my own lack of skill! I was learning to edit while working on this so that certainly slowed things down! Lots of googling and zooms with other professionals! Thank goodness for community! I thought for while about adding music- decided against against it. The silence and jagged edges to that silence are so much what it feels to me these days. Even inside of forward movement there exist these jagged, raw breaks. These breaks in our “thoughts”- the silence to just take in the visual. That there is time for both taking in of stimulus and time for reflection. For processing. For action. That isn’t always a smooth experience.

Our film was made for no money- with no crew and no post production costs. I taught myself to edit in order to cut the footage. It is my attempt at “shedding” my own previous skin and evolving. It’s vulnerable, brave, tender, raw… and ultimately I hope, strong enough to stand on its own, as it is, bumps and scrapes and warts and all.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Watching the feedback was truly a gift. I have been solo with this footage for so many months now, so it was incredible to me that others were even watching it!! Sharing it. I am so grateful and humbled.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea for this film was very much born of this time in all our lives. A time to reflect and change. To alter for the better. Embrace the challenge of that growth and dive in.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I don’t know that I could say what film I’ve seen the most in my life… however I will say I have been watching and re watching films I love a lot right now- Portrait Of A Lady On Fire. Nomadland. Personal Shopper. Babette’s Feast. Fargo. Morven Callar. Lost In Translation. Daughters Of The Dust.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Figuring out the ways to submit and what do can be so complicated- such a wilderness. But the great folks at Film Freeway I think do an amazing job of helping us navigate that. Movie Maker Magazine also has fantastic guides to festivals. But ultimately I find other film makers are my best go to. Community!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I’m pretty all over the map music wise- but I think I may have listened to Talking Heads This Must Be The Place maybe the most.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

What’s next for me… well I have a short script CAIRNS is out to festivals, a second short, BIRDWATCHING, is going out to festivals and am developing a feature script with my brother, my friend and longtime collaborator Daniel Talbott which we hope to film next year. Also I have gone back to work as an actress and we are filming season 2 of Outer Banks.

Interview with Filmmaker Ina Nersesian (WHISPER)

WHISPER was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the January 2020 Dance & Music Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

As you know It is my MA diploma project.

I had chosen to tell the story I have been through. Story I lived, felt, experienced. I could close my eyes and see it vividly feel the light, taste of sugar bread, ambient sound, recall the smell of that house we were living in.

And in another hand it was my dedication to my grandmother, she had Alzheimer’s disease for more than 7 years, disease completely vanished from her memory. Somwhere unconsciously, I have kept special moments of ours and remembered them for both of us.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

This movie was made on the enthusiasm of each person you can read in credits. It took almost a year to finish it. Post-production took a bit longer than pre or production itself.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Power of whisper

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

It was very difficult to adapt the Georgian story of 90th in nowadays Hungry. As soon as Adam came on board, obstacles become much easier to overcome.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I cried, it’s the first movie I have made as a Scriptwriter /Director/Cinematographer. 1st ever I have sent to festivals. It made me cry to see and hear the audience feedbacks where everybody could read the message could feel and see things through.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea came from one of the long talks we use to have, with my dearest friend Lamis my classmate cinematographer also Gaffer of Whisper, when the deadline to pitch for our diploma project was approaching.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Home Alone. I watch it every new year.👀

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is well builder user-friendly and filmmakers-friendly platform.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Yann Tiersen – Comptine d’un autre été

I just love it.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Next?!

Collect more feelings, emotions, experiences realize and analyze them, put them together, and tell a new story someday.

Interview with Filmmaker Elizabeth Lewis (COVID BACH)

COVID BACH played to rave reviews at the January 2021 Female Filmmakers Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

The Covid pandemic, of course, and the Bach interpretation by Andras Schiff.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Two months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

lively, intense.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

There were no obstacles. It was such a joy to make.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I loved that they responded to the music and that they saw personal meaning in the imagery.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I saw Andras Schiff perform the Well-Tempered Clavier on You Tube so I ordered the complete set of cd’s knowing that I would make a film called Covid Bach. This was the beginning of the pandemic and we were bombarded with so much scary news. To me, the exponential growth of the virus reflected the growth of the musical notes which start simple and then explode.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The Glass Menagerie with Katharine Hepburn.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

FilmFreeway is the best! It makes it so easy and economical to get your film promoted and out there.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Louisiana 1927 by Randy Newman

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have just completed a short live action screenplay ( about 10 minutes ) called Very Convincing. The script has already been accepted in a festival so that gives me encouragement to produce it. ( once the pandemic is over).