Interview with Screenwriter James Hughes (THE HITLER PARADOX)

Winner of BEST SHORT SCREENPLAY at the July 2018 Screenplay Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

James Hughes: Simply put, Two time travelers, from different origins, find themselves in conflict as they debate how to handle bringing Hitler to justice. The idea of going back to “deal” with Hitler is not a new one, in fact, it is often a question of morality as to when you should if you could. So this common goal brings the two travelers into contact and conflict with one another. Each having very different means to an “end” for him, with one wanting Hitler to stand trial and the other wanting to personally execute him.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy, Sci-fi

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

It’s a longshot, but if it were to be made into a movie, I believe it would be because of the opportunities it holds within it. The opportunity to watch talented actors bring the characters and their far-fetched debate to life, the opportunity to design an authentic look and feel to the world around them, and the opportunity to have fun while doing what you love, making films.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Outlandish Squabble

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I watch a lot of movies, I must say, but if I have to narrow it down to one particular film I’ve happily watched, again and again, it would be “The Jerk” with Steve Martin. Made six years before I was even born, I remember watching it with my parents growing up, so a combination of nostalgia and a comfort in comedy have made it one of my favorite films.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I first had the idea in late 2016, but like most of my work, it had to bounce around in my head for awhile. I started writing it in April 2017 and finished the final draft in October 2017, so around 7 months, but most of that time is spent waiting for the next bit of dialog, description, or direction to smack me in the face while I worked on other projects.

7. How many stories have you written?

Quite a few actually, a dozen different short films, some original comic book scripts, a web series script(6 episodes currently), and I have recently started working on my first feature script.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

My favorite song is always changing, especially since I find so much character and story inspirations from listening to music. Currently, I’d have to say my favorite song is “Content” by Joywave, but if you ask me again in a few months, it will most certainly be different.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

My biggest obstacle has always been myself, can I stay motivated, focused, can I fight the thought of this project “Just doesn’t work”? Am I wasting my time? Shouldn’t I work on something more feasible? My inner monologue has always been my biggest critic, but as long as I can answer the questions, I move forward.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Aside from writing, my passions include raising my son, performing comedy(Stand up and Improv), and drawing(shameless Instagram plug, @Gohztilla).

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

I have used a few different submission platforms and I have to say, FilmFreeway is my absolute favorite, clean and clear UI, with any and all information and links easily available to me.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I wanted to enter this festival mainly due to the emphasize on the written word, so much so that you would do a table read for the winner. The feedback was great and thorough, but the best moment for me was watching the reading, to see the actor(s) snicker or hold in a laugh at something I’ve written just makes me feel great. A small(.01%) of the feeling I want when everything about this project is said and done.

 

 

Genre: Sci-Fi, Comedy

Two time travelers find themselves in conflict as they aim to bring Hitler to justice, although in vastly different ways.

CAST LIST:

Eva: Tayna Bevan
Hitler: Scott McCulloch
Narrator: Kate Fenton
Tiom: Danilo Reyes
Jonny: Michael Lake

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

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Interview with Winning Screenwriter John Dummer (FORGET-ME-NOTS)

July 2018 Winning Sci-Fi/Fantasy Screenwriter.

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

John Dummer: Spiritual entropy. When the universe presents you with an existential threat, an event that will surely obliterate you and everything that gives this world meaning, what do you do?

Do you dig a grave, or do you plant a seed?

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Sci-Fi, Horror, Drama.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Because I believe it will sell tickets? The hope is that it will be a great ride. The tale poses some intriguing and fundamental questions, and should fuel some lively arguments on the way home from the theater.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

“What’s next?” Meaning both “What the heck happens next onscreen?” and “What, if anything, is next for the human species?”

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

“It’s a Wonderful Life” and “Jaws.” Two tales of surpassing horror.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

They’re all different. This one took ten months, though I will continue to noodle on it until the next one pulls me away.

7. How many stories have you written?

Not a ton. I spend a lot of time cultivating seeds till I find a good one, then I nurture the hell out of it. Seems to work for me – three scripts have made the Nicholl semifinals so far, the last one finishing in the top 30.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Occasionally I’ll stumble across the perfect mood music to play in the background as I write a particular story.

On my first script, a rom-com about a mismatched young couple who run off to Loch Ness in search of an old salt who claims to have touched the Monster, I wore out the groove on Enya’s “Orinoco Flow.” “Sail away, sail away, sail away…”

For “The Moonbeam Fisherman”, a coming-of-age tale set in the summer of ’69, about a troubled youth who comes to believe an old fisherman may be a marooned interplanetary visitor, Acker Bilk’s “Strangers on the Shore” filled my head with just the right vibe of nostalgia and loss.

“Forget-Me-Nots” is very much about haunting vocalizations. An appropriate backing track would be an otherworldly chorus of hoots and calls and plaints – an alien version of the Voyager recording on speed.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

This was not the hardest script to give birth to. As a former programmer with a lifelong interest in evolution, I’ve been reading obsessively about A.I., the nature of consciousness, transhumanism and what might come next for the hairless ape. So the raw material was close at hand. The trick is to guide the audience through such rarified realms without overexplaining.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Climate change – the consequences are so enormous it’s hard not to be overwhelmed. Also really good carrot cake. Whatever it takes to face the day, right?

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experience working with the submission platform site?

FilmFreeway is great for learning about contests and keeping submissions organized. They’ve done a good job of standardizing the submission process. Some contests do better than others at updating “judging status,” but that’s a minor quibble.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Mainly it was the chance to hear the work performed.

Feedback is always much appreciated, the less varnished the better. I’m never more likely to see something afresh than when I consider the POV of someone with whom I disagree.

 

Watch the Winning Screenplay: 

Genre: Sci-Fi, Horror, Drama

A grieving astrobiologist and two uninvited guests await a supernova explosion that will destroy all life on Earth. A mysterious plant threatens to bring matters to an even swifter end.

CAST LIST:

Newscaster: Julie C. Sheppard
Audrey: Tayna Bevan
Narrator: Kate Fenton
Evan: Scott McCulloch
Girl: Samantha Carly

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Dazhi Huang (NIGHT LIVE)

NIGHT LIVE played to rave reviews at the April 2018 Experimental & Music FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Dazhi Huang: This film is my graduation thesis, In the month when I was brainstorming for the script, two unfortunate incidence happened: One was the Pulse shooting, the other one was a white policeman killing an unarmed black man. I was traumatized by both event, and I was also fully aware of their social effects which magnified by social media and live streaming. I had this impulse to put my takes to these two incidents into my upcoming film, but u sing a more lighthearted, entertaining way, in order to portray it authentically to myself, to make it fit for the environment that I live in.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took around 3-4 months

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Night Live

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Finding the actors and coordinating the schedules of the crew(I didn’t actually have a producer this time so it was really tough and annoying)

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I discovered a lot of new things that I never knew about my own film, so I was amazed.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

During the creation period of the film, I had a tough relationship with my father, so some parts of life naturally blended into fabrications

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Week End by Jean-Luc Godard and Persona by Ingmar Bergman and Friends the sitcom

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s a great platform

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

The times there are a changing by Bob Dylan

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I wish, I’m going to grad school for film directing

night_live
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Kaitlin Creadon (FOR THE LOVE OF THE CHILD)

FOR THE LOVE OF THE CHILD played to rave reviews at the March 2018 DOCUMENTARY FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Kaitlin Creadon: With the wonderful opportunity to make any type of film I desired through my schooling, I had the chance to turn this once-in-a-lifetime event into a documentary. Creating this personal documentary was definitely out of my comfort zone, but I knew it was a story I truly wanted to share with the world. A big motivation for completing this film was the hope that someone else
going through this will see it, and that the film will help them through their own journey.

From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I started working on the concept in August of 2016 and it took about a year and a half to produce and edit. Even today, I am still working on BTS as I just have a wonderful goldmine of footage still to share.

How would you describe your short film in two words?

True love.

What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle I personally faced was overcoming my own fear of being on camera. It is a very personal story, so I knew right from the beginning that I would have to be on camera and talk about my experiences. It was difficult for me at the time, yet I am so glad I put that aside to become an integral part of my own documentary.

What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Excitement, yet surprisingly defensive. Nonetheless, the was extremely interesting to hear the audience’s take on the documentary!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Like I mentioned, through the MFA thesis process I had the chance to work on a film of my choosing. Ultimately, I landed on documenting this experience. Meeting my birth mother in person was something I knew I wanted to do, and this was a great way to do it. I reached out to the adoption agency The Cradle, then Tabitha (my birth mother) Collette (birth aunt), and Robbie (half-brother) and his family, to see if they would be interested in being a part of this as well. I received overwhelming support. It all started to come together, and we began filming!

Even if I hadn’t used this footage for a documentary, I feel so blessed the entire process was caught on camera as it is hard to remember everything that happened in person!

What film have you seen the most in your life?

I think it has to be Pirates of the Caribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl. I’ve lost track of how many times I’ve seen it on DVD, but the thirteen-year-old me saw it a record seven times in theaters!

You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

The submission process for this film festival was quite easy! The Documentary Feedback Film Festival made me feel very comfortable right from the get-go.

What is next for you? A new film?

Currently no films on the docket, however I am a new Adjunct Professor at DePaul University, where I received my MFA in Directing! I am looking forward to seeing what this new journey has in store for me.
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Anuj Gulati (THE MANLIEST MAN)

THE MANLIEST MAN was the winner of BEST FILM at the March 2018 FEEDBACK Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Anuj Gulati: The film came about as a graduation requirement for my thesis towards an MFA at NYU Tisch School of Arts, Asia.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Around three years. The script was written in the midst of a number of activities that we were doing in school. Then came the process of finding the right location, which took a couple of months. India offers a lot of options. Then, in fact, I took a break from pursuing the film. A year later, I went back to the location and started putting a team together. We shot for 10 days, the edit again was done gradually over a period of eight months. Overall, it took longer than I wanted it to take, given that other life things needed to fall in place alongside.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Everyday Horror. This is thanks to a review written for the film by a critic. That is the title he used. I think it sums it up well.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Honestly, the biggest obstacle I faced with making this one was to just do it. I held myself back on a number of occasions, waiting for the right moment. But it never came, until I did it. I think one of the biggest challenges as a creator is to jump into the process, to create your own deadlines, and then to push yourself to get talented people onboard your vision.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was elated, sitting here across the world, viewing an entirely fresh audience talking about their impressions of the film. Thank you to the festival for the opportunity.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The script took a while to feel right. I first started with the idea of exploring the still prevalent, but hush-hush, practice of female infanticide in remote parts of India. I came back with some shocking stories. The story of one of the families (that I wasn’t able to meet) stayed with me. They had tried to have a boy thirteen times, which means they managed to put to death, 12 female babies. Their thirteenth was also a girl, and they kept her.

Back at my desk, I tried to write about this family’s doings, and the irony of the result of their mission. But what I was dealing with was too much. I had to find a way to deal with this sensitive issue and avoid being heavy-handed. After a few drafts, I started following a male protagonist instead. The script then took shape of an absurdist tale set in a village where families are required to have boys, the blame of bearing a girl being taken by the man.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The Graduate.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It makes life much better, to have your film and it’s assets ready to submitted on a user-friendly platform. Keeping a track of festival submissions is a heavy job, help from the platform is much appereciated. My film was however, submittied by Aug & Ohr Medien, a Berlin based agency that managed my submissions. A lot of the screenings and recognition is thanks to their efforts.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Haha. Don’t stop ‘til you get enough, by Michael Jackson.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes, a first feature. We are looking to go into production this year, 2018.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Cinematographer Rasmus Heise (I KILL GIANTS)

Rasmus Heise is the cinematographer of the Netflix Original series “The Rain” and the drama/fantasy feature film “I Kill Giants”. The Danish DOP started out working on a string of short films including Oscar-winning family drama “Helium”.

Matthew Toffolo: Where were you born and raised? Was photography something you always wanted to do as your career?

Rasmus Heise: I was born in Copenhagen and raised in different cities around Denmark. I picked up a VHS camera at summer camp, age 13, and did a short film starring my sister. I overheard some adults prasing my work. That never left me. It wasn’t untill I was around 21, that I fund out that cinematography was what I wanted to do. I was taking the 8 months course at the European Film School in Ebeltoft, Denmark. This is where I met the people that I would go on making short films with for many years ahead. Later I studied cinematography for 4 years at the National Filmschool of Denmark in Copenhagen.

What has been your most proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project to date?

The first real big challenge was the two final episodes of the TV show called “The Protectors” (Livvagterne, Denmark, director Mikkel Serup). We had to shoot locations in Denmark and Marocco and studio in Denmark. It was a big challenge making it all flow seamlessly, and I think we did a great job. In more recent times I’m very proud of I Kill Giants. A huge challenge for everybody involved. Shooting a challenging script in only 35 days in two countries and with many cgi and in-camera effects. I’m also proud of the work on the Netflix show The Rain. I shot 4 episodes for director Natasha Arthy. We had a huge amount of stuff to do, and very little time. But somehow we and the hardworking crew made it work.

Tell us about the film I KILL GIANTS. How did you get involved in the project? What makes this film unique?

I have worked with director Anders Walter for many years. I have shot about 20 music videos and 4 short films for him. After our short film Helium won an Oscar for best live action short, things started to happen. He was offered to direct IKG, and I jumped on the project with him. The american producers didn’t know me, but luckily I had shot the first season of Amazon Studios’ show Hand of God for director Marc Forster. So they called him up, and he must have said something nice about me I guess 🙂

The film is based on a really beautiful graphic novel from 2008 by the same name. It’s a very beautiful story, and I feel very lucky to have been a part of making it in to a movie. I want to thank producer Kim Magnussen for also helping me get onboard.

Is there a type of film/TV show that you love to work on that you haven’t worked on yet?

I would love to make something gritty. A twisted thriller.

What are you generally looking for in a director in order for you to do your job as best as possible?

It’s all about being on the same page I think. I always try and spend time getting to know each other. The better I know someone, the better a job I tend to do for him or her. I love directors who has a vision, but are not afraid to let go and let the project take you somewhere you hadn’t planned.

What do you think a producer/director is looking for when they bring on you to DP the film?

I know my craft, and I work fast! Haha. I know that many producers like it. I think directors likes me, because I can work in many genres and maybe also because I’m easy to talk to. I see my job as becomming the directors best friend, and I try to be the best collaborator in every way. I want to help the director, but also challenge him or her to push the project to become even better.

What is your passion in life besides photography and film?

These days it’s my beautiful family. They are amazing every day.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life (besides the ones you worked on?

I have MANY favorite movies. My all time favorite is Heat by Michael Mann. Have seen that so many times. My biggest dream would be DP-ing a movie directed by Michael Mann. Or PT Anderson. Or David Fincher. Or Marc Forster. Or.. well the list is very long.

What advice do you have for young cinematographers who would eventually like to DP movies for a living one day?

What you need is collaborators. Find like-minded people. Learn and grow together. Film school is not essential. But it’s a great place to learn from your mistakes without anybody out in the film industry noticing you screwed up. So if you don’t get into film school, or don’t have the money for it, find another way to get experince and learn. Make non-budget shorts or do music videos or art projects. Go to a film work shop or find collaborators some other way.

Please follow me on instagram: rasmus_heise

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photo:Umedia.
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Supervising Sound Editor Donald Sylvester (Logan, Walk the Line, 3:10 to Yuma)

Donald Sylvester has worked on over 100 films in the last 25 years and is considered one of the top people working in the craft of Post-Production Sound today. I asked him a few simple questions via email and he countered with some really insightful and meaningful answers. Enjoy it:

Where were you born and raised? When was working in the film industry start to become a career pursuit for you?

I grew up in the Garden State of New Jersey, where all my core principles were established. My father moved us to Atlanta when I was 11, and it was a wonderful experience during that period – both for Atlanta and for me. It was an unprecedented period of great growth for the city and the awakening of a progressive South – and growth for me personally as well. I dabbled in a lot of stuff, but always gravitated toward music. Frankly the film business didn’t come calling for me until a long, long time later after I moved to California. I reached some level of success before I realized that the music business was a bad idea. My wife, who was a film editor, suggested that motion pictures and I would be a good fit. My skills and instincts fit right in. She was right.

What has been your most proudest work of your career? Or, what has been your favorite project?

For a lot of my years I worked on other people’s films as a sound editor. I learned a lot and loved the people and the work, but I never really thought of those projects as “mine.” I didn’t start supervising in earnest until 2001. I could write a book about each one of those shows (and maybe one day I will!). I did two “Garfields” which were not great movies but working with Bill Murray was really unforgettable. And I supervised and mixed “The Fault In Our Stars,” and that was a wonderful and meaningful experience.

But the film I like the best is “310 to Yuma,” and I like it for so many reasons. I like it primarily because it’s a Western and it’s got guns and horses and spurs and all that good stuff that Westerns must have, but also because it is the kind of movie where every single sound is totally plot- or character driven. As simple as that may sound, it resulted in a very satisfying experience. Plus, it’s a good movie.

In your words, what exactly does a Supervising Sound Editor do?

A director once told me that he really wanted to do everything on his film himself, but now, as a director, he was only allowed to tell everybody else what to do. I’m very sympathetic to that and I try to help the director achieve his goals. I try to get to know him and what he needs and understand the vision of his film. Simply put, I see myself as the sound extension of the director. I make sure he hears what he wants to hear, communicates the story he wants to tell, as well as faithfully executing the sonic challenges he wants to express.

I often like to imagine I’m the creative force behind the soundtrack of these films, but honestly I am only a trussed-up worker-bee, taking directions and challenging myself to deliver something I think is perhaps better than what was requested, as well as hitting the target set forth by the director precisely on the head. There’s also a lot of management duties and schedule-making, but I seldom write about that.

Give us a breakdown of a big budget film like LOGAN. How many people are
working in the sound department in post-production? How long do you and your team have to complete your end of the film? Do you generally work with the same
team?

I am fortunate to work a lot at Fox, where we’ve established an enlightened work flow for me. Our method seems to get results and head off post sound problems as well. I start early on the show during principle photography and as the scenes are cut together by the picture editors, I fancy them up with sound effects and cleaned-up dialogue. Later, when the post editorial is in full swing, I’ll expand my crew to include dialogue editors and sound effects editors. A film like Logan had a healthy budget but didn’t have a long post schedule, so we were asked to work weekends and long hours. In the end, I had two sound designers, two sound effects editors, two foley editors, and four dialogue and ADR editors, not to mention two assistants. This is actually a small crew to bring this kind of film to the mix stage. Much of the work gets finessed at the mix, which is the battlefield trenches for getting all the ideas to gel and finished in time. There’s always a big chunk of the budget for looping, which can be extensive, as well as temp mixing and audience previews. Yes, I like to work with the same people whenever I can, but schedules often don’t permit that luxury.

Is there a type of project that you like to work on that you haven’t worked on yet?

As I’ve worked on more and more films over the years, my goals have changed. There was a time I thought I’d like to do a big science fiction thriller, but I’ve actually learned that genres alone don’t make the most satisfying films. What tickles my fancy are films rich on character development with some insight into the human condition. Now, no one goes out and says, “I’m gonna make the greatest human condition film this town’s ever seen!” But if they’re relying on car chases or space battles and they’ve neglected depth of character, then I’m not gonna get too excited about it no matter how “special” the special effects are.

To be honest, I wouldn’t mind doing a war movie (mostly WWII for my taste) or even a musical. But musicals don’t spend any time on sound effects, so let’s scratch that one off the list and just say WWII. With characters!

What is your passion in life besides sound?

Sound is my passion, but if you take sound away there’s my great interest in music – but that’s sound too. I’ve often imagined going back into radio (I ran the college radio station WUOG in Athens, Georgia during my college years) but I would only do that if I could DJ a radio show that would blend music and sounds into a cohesive story – but that’s what I do now. So, what I probably like after all that is to travel, because over the years I’ve really enjoyed travelling and recording sounds and sound effects in interesting and distant locations. But … that’s sound again.

What movie have you watched the most times in your life?

I assume you mean what movie have I voluntarily watched most often that I haven’t worked on? Because when you work on a film you actually watch it hundreds of times until you memorize every frame of it. And that concept prevents me from watching most movies more than once or twice. However, my favorite movie would have to be “Withnail and I,” which isn’t everyone’s cup of tea but ticks all the boxes for me.

What advice do you have for people who would like to do what you do for a living one day?

I would suggest that if you want to get into theatrical movie sound then you should make sure you’re ready for the long hours and hard work, and then you should find people who are currently making films (or shorts or TV shows or documentaries) and offer to work for them for FREE. Just get your foot in the door and do anything and everything you can to get familiar with the process and begin to focus on the area where you want to work. And one day (if you still like it and it likes you back), somebody will say, “Hey, you should be getting paid for this stuff.” Then you’re on your way.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.