Interview with Screenwriter Kris Bauske (THE BOOK WRITER)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Kris Bauske: The script is the story of a divorced woman who knows she can write a terrific book for a musical, but no one will give her a chance until an old friend arranges for her to work with platinum 80’s rock star Larry Limpet. The only problem is that Larry is a chauvinist and is determined to be rid of the woman. She refuses to be dumped, and they go head to head while creating a hit musical until Larry realizes he’s been a terrible ass and maybe he even likes this feisty book writer. Through conflict and difficulty they both grow and realize life isn’t over because you’re over 50, and they might even have one last chance at love.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

There are a lot of men in the world who don’t realize they limit the number of opportunities available to women. Many of them even think they support women, but when they’re faced with the truth, they’d have to admit they prefer to work with other men and do all they can to make that happen. This movie shows guys how pervasive the problem really is while setting it up in a relatable, hilarious comedy so the moral of the story isn’t too hard to take. The film also allows women a chance to show the men in their life just how accepted the problem really is while watching one woman prove women really can do anything they set their minds to.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Painful Truth

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

To Catch a Thief

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I wrote it in 3 days. I have rewritten it four times since then, adding a little more depth each time. I started in late March 2018.

7. How many stories have you written?

Dozens. I started as an internationally published and produced playwright and migrated to screenplays.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

In The Air Tonight, Phil Collins

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

None. Fortunately or unfortunately, I had just faced a similar experience in my own life, and I find it therapeutic to write it out when I’m really angry. The more angry I am, the faster the story comes, and this time I was pretty hot.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I have two adult children who still come to me for advice and guidance, so I am passionate about letting them know they are my highest priority. Aside from that, I spend a lot of time working with animals and trying to explain to people why they should adopt shelter animals and forego pet stores. Animals need advocates because they can’t speak for themselves.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It has been immensely satisfying. I have learned about festivals and competitions I never knew existed because of my membership with FilmFreeway. I have received thoughtful feedback, and this particular script has won at five different festivals this year, so it’s been mostly very positive. Of course, you always scratch your head when it wins at multiple festivals and then is completely ignored by others, but that’s the way in this business.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I love to write comedy, and much of my published work is humorous, so I wanted to participate in a festival that only considers comedies. I was delighted to learn the script would get a reading. There is no better tool for honing a script than hearing it read by talented actors, especially a comedy. I can’t wait to see the video!
 

Doyle Tipton is a successful playwright and author, but her name causes most people to think she’s a man. She has the chops to make it as a bigtime book writer for stage musicals, but she’s never actually had a success in this area. Every time she proposes a concept to a band, they hem and haw and steal the idea without including the woman book writer. Finally, Doyle calls in a favor and gets hired, sight unseen, to write the book for a musical based on the catalog of Larry Limpet and the Lizards, a multi-platinum band that hit huge in the eighties. The only problem is, Larry Limpet is a male chauvinist in the truest style, and Doyle Tipton isn’t taking any of his shit.

CAST LIST: 

Narration – Katelyn Varadi
Larry – Sean Ballantyne
Doyle – Norma Dawn Dunphy

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Advertisements

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Tyler G. (FIRE ALARM)

 July 2018 Winning COMEDY Short Screenplay.

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Tyler G.: The screenplay is about a foreigner who must relocate to a new and unfamiliar city after a family crisis. Thrown into this world of confusion, he accidently pulls a fire alarm, which awakens a resolution within himself and those around him.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

comedy, drama

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This would make an enjoyable movie for it’s humor and surprise, and the theme of human connectivity. The idea that we all need to connect with our fellow humans is a universal story that all people can relate to.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

funny surprise

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The empire strikes back

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

A month

7. How many stories have you written?

hundreds

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

dont have a favorite but I think I listened to that song by beyonce the most because it was always on anytime I turned on the radio.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I dont have any obstacles.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

surfing, drawing

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

I dont recall any experiences, but it seems reasonably convenient to use

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I just wanted people to read my work so I submitted to a lot of places. This one is particularly interesting in how it’s formatted to do read throughs of the work as a reward. I was very pleased with this festival, and it’s very encouraging to get a sense people care about stories and the work writers do.

 

Genre: Comedy

When Hamid’s mother dies, he must move to Vancouver to live with Uncle Amir. Uncle Amir reminds him that if we aren’t careful, life may pass us by and we never take for granted those around us. Trapped in a foreign world he does not understand, Hamid unwittingly sets into play a series of events that awaken this very idea in his elderly neighbors.

CAST LIST:

Ethel: Zena Driver
Marge: Alicia Payne
Narrator: Val Cole
Uncle Amir: Dorian Shine
Manager: Jolly Amoako

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Robert Dodrill (POLE)

 July 2018 Winning Sci-Fi 1st Scene Screenplay Winner.

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Robert Dodrill: A large part of the story is about discovering something that at first seems magical, but then realizing there is a darker side to everything, that sometimes beauty is only on the surface. Sort of like becoming an adult and seeing the truth about the “man behind the curtain.” There’s also a bit of trying to answer the question of if your intentions are good, but the road to get there is immoral, what does that say about you?

Premise: While studying Remote caves in northern Greenland, a team of polar scientists stumble upon the entrance to the fabled, and seemingly long abandoned “North Pole Village.” Inside they discover remnants of advanced technology, evidence of a terrible tragedy, and the gram realization that the Pole was sealed off for a reason.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Fantasy/Horror with a bit of Science Fiction

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I think it has those familiar elements of fantasy/horror that people enjoy and would draw them tonit, but it also has a twist where it is t the same thing we’ve seen a thousand times before. In the right hands I think it could stand out in the genre.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Exploring Legends

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Jurassic Park.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

About a year and half.

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written a several produced short films and 3 unproduced original features on my own and 2 animated features as a co-writer.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

This is the song that doesn’t end from Lambchops.

Still hoping there’s an actually ending someday.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I had to do a lot of research on Greenland exploration and the caves, and how these scientists might react to what they find. Before writing I connected with a real Polar climate scientist, who gave me a lot of valuable information about the industry and the area.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Filmmaking (which may be a cop out answer) I really enjoy directing, even though I wrote this with the intention of someone else filling that role.

Aside from that world, I spent several years of my early 20s as a pro-wrestler. Traveling to various Indy promotions around the mid-west and performing for small town crowds. I still miss it, but filmmaking has less wear and tear on the body.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

I don’t believe I’ve ever had a single issue with FilmFreeway. It’s a really great platform for finding and submitting to festivals with ease.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

With the genre being Fantasy realm, I was looking for a festival that specifically deals with that, because I felt like any feedback I got would be coming from people who are fans of the genre as well as experienced readers.

Any feedback is valuable at some level. I always try to take feedback to heart, and never take it personal. Mainly because I realize that I live with the same story for months or years and so I think there is always your mind filling in the gaps. So something might be missing but you just don’t see it because your brain connects the dots for you. Getting feedback helps point out what needs work and what doesn’t. I was very happy with the feedback I got from this festival, gave me a lot of great points to go back and try to improve upon. As mentioned above I was even more interested because it was also coming from people who enjoyed the genre.

 

Genre: Sci-Fi, Thriller, Horror

While studying remote caves in northern Greenland, a team of polar scientists stumble upon the entrance to the fabled, and seemingly long abandoned “North Pole village.” Inside they discover remnants of advanced technology, evidence of a terrible tragedy, and the grim realization that the Pole was sealed off for a reason.

CAST LIST:

Maisie: Amrit Kaur
Beckett: Dorian Shine
Narrator: Val Cole
Nicholas: Justin Darmanin
Sam: Jolly Amoako
Sasha: Zena Driver

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Vance Walker (GO-GO BOY)

 July 2018 LGBT Feature Screenplay Winner

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Vance Walker: It’s about a go-go boy in 1990 and his co-workers living a fun, raunchy life— colorful and sexy, kind of like a gay Flashdance, until AIDS starts hitting close to home.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Hard to say since there is a lot of music and dancing, but it is not a musical in the purist sense of the word. Is there a Comedy/Drama/Romance/LGBT/AIDS genre? If pressed, I would have to say Drama/Romance.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

When I see something like “POSE” or Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood, I am so happy and grateful for the documentation of these past times, which tell our stories and hardships and histories and how far we have come— and poignantly tell these stories with such beauty, honesty and creativity. I would love it if go-go boy could also be that kind of entertaining historical perspective.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Really sexy.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Probably The Way We Were. When we first got a video player, we only had a few movies, and I watched that over and over and over.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I started it in 1990, when it is set. A friend of mine, a literary agent, read it and loved it, but said he nor his agency would touch it with a ten-foot pole. Too gay. Too niche. Before I knew it, the news about AIDS meds, cocktails, and advancement made my story seem dated. Last year I picked it up and thought enough time had gone by, and the advancements in AIDS treatment and prevention has been so drastic, not to mention gay rights— it’s not dated anymore— it’s more of a historical period piece. I always loved these characters and the story, so I dove in and did some major re-writing.

7. How many stories have you written?

Twenty? Thirty? I don’t know.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Well, since I played by the rules on “What movie have you seen the most times in your life?” listing only one, and not the other possibilities (Apartment Zero, Funny Girl, Postcards From the Edge, A Star Is Born, or Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), I’ll list three. I used to always say, “Watch Closely Now / With One More Look At You,” the Finale from A Star Is Born, but now I would say (almost everything by Melissa Etheridge, Cyndi Lauper and Bette Midler notwithstanding): “And So It Goes,” “Kissing A Fool,” and “If You Go Away.”

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Having (some of) the characters be cliché and talk in clichés, without the script seeming cliché.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

My kids. Health.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Easy, fantastic.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

My friend, Bobb, and I were helping each other with our scripts, and he had submitted his to a festival or two—I don’t think I knew festivals even had screenwriting competitions—and it got me thinking: it would be nice to get my work out there, see if anyone likes it… see if anyone out there “gets” me, my sense of humor, etc.

The details of the initial feedback was surprising— I wasn’t expecting it to be so thorough and thoughtful. It was very helpful. They gave me time to apply the feedback if I wanted to, before the reading, which was nice. They did a synopsis, which was really cool and helpful: seeing how someone else interprets things differently than written, or expected was interesting and helpful.

 

 

Genre: Drama, Romance

It’s 1990 and LA’s hottest go-go boy is living a wild and crazy, hedonistic, carefree life until AIDS threatens to bring it all crashing down. 

 

CAST LIST:

Jo: Kelly Seo
Garland: Abbas Wahab
William: Shawn Devlin
Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Art: Cory Bertrand
Nate: Sam Fazli
Edie: Laurel Galt

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Sean Elwood (WHERE THE BAD KIDS GO)

 July 2018 Winning 1st Scene HORROR Screenplay.

 
Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Sean Elwood: It’s been sixteen years since Jesse was taken away from his abusive, alcoholic mother after she had tried to kill him. When he hears of the news that she committed suicide, he returns to his childhood house for preparation to sell it, as well as confront his dark past once and for all. He soon discovers that something evil lurks within the depths of the house, and after all these years, it’s been waiting for him to return.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror, Drama

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

“Where the Bad Kids Go” begins with a bang and doesn’t let go. Imagine “The Babadook” meets “Hereditary,” both successful horror movies that were also truly terrifying. This script is filled with dread and a foreboding atmosphere from the very start, and ends with a powerful finale meant to both make you scared and cry. The story delves into the mind of a man whose past comes back to haunt him, literally. With moments of true terror, a wide character dynamic, and a haunting message, I feel that “Where the Bad Kids Go” would be the next big success if given the opportunity to be made into a movie.

Furthermore, “Where the Bad Kids Go” can be made on a low budget, apart from the big finale, and is the perfect character piece for up-and-coming actors. It contains only 1 main location (6 locations total), and 3 main characters (plus about 8 small roles), so it would also be easily manageable.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Super spooky

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

This is tough, as I watch a lot of the same movies multiple times. It would have to be a tie between the “Dawn of the Dead” remake, or “Final Destination” (the plane explosion scene scares the absolute shit out of me, but I watch it anyway). Or, “Stay” with Ryan Gosling, Ewan McGregor, and Naomi Watts, a little known movie that is great in every way.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

This screenplay has actually been in the works even before I thought of turning it into a script. It started off as a short story that I wrote back in 2015 that I later adapted into a feature script in January 2018. I’ve continued to work on this screenplay and have started on creating a storyboard for it (as I write this, I am currently at 165 shots, or 17 pages in). I plan to approach investors/production companies with this project and want to show storyboarding, character designs, creatures designs, and even a layout/blueprint of The House to give them as much of a picture as possible with what I envision for “Where the Bad Kids Go.”

7. How many stories have you written?

As far as I can count, 26, both short stories and screenplays.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Right now, my favorite song probably has to be “Somebody Else” by The 1975.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

My biggest obstacle was keeping the page count as short as possible without removing too much of the emotion, message, and detail that I wanted to include in the screenplay. There is a lot involved within the short story that was difficult to put into a script, but I had to remember that audiences are smart and will notice signs, symbolism, and meaning without actually saying it or showing it. The first draft was heavy with voiceover that described a lot of things and made it too obvious to the reader. The second draft had an ending that was too long after the climax/resolution. So, with shortening everything down and reducing the page count, the script now reads smoothly, quickly, and almost effortlessly.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Writing is probably my main passion, but beyond that, I have a strong passion for the “Alien” films and collect anything and everything surrounding the franchise. I’ve collected action figures since I was a kid, and I’ve collected life-sized replicas of the heads of the aliens from the four original films (Alien thru Alien Resurrection). The franchise is my favorite and the collectibles are my pride and joy.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

So far, FilmFreeway has made submitting scripts into festivals very easy and efficient. The platform is clean and easy to maneuver around in, and even though I’ve just started using it this year, I’ve had a better experience with FilmFreeway more so than WithoutABox, which is what I used before I stumbled upon FilmFreeway. The site is clean and I enjoy the updates that I receive from the site regarding festivals, whether new or existing, and they keep me in the loop of festivals from all around the world.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

The idea of possibly having my script read/performed by actors was a major influencing factor as not very many festivals provide that as a perk to the officially selected script. I believe that reading the script by actors shines a spotlight on the script and gives it the recognition it deserves. It is also an amazing opportunity to promote the screenplay if the screenwriter wants to market it to investors or production companies by giving them something to watch/read along to. My thoughts and feelings regarding the initial feedback that I received was nothing but a positive experience. The feedback was wonderful and touched on many aspects of the screenplay that really had the gears in my head turning, and made me think more about the story or certain parts of the screenplay. It was nothing but positive suggestions to help make the script better, and was very professional and interesting to read from a screenwriter’s point of view.

Genre: Horror, Thriller, Drama

When Jesse returns to his childhood home after hearing about his abusive mother’s suicide, he soon discovers that something evil lurks within the depths of the house, and it’s been waiting for him to return after all these years.

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Val Cole
Jesse: Jolly Amoako
Helen: Alicia Payne

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Ron Riekki (FOR GOOD BEHAVIOR)

July 2018 Winning SHORT Thriller Screenplay.

 
Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Ron Riekki: A lawyer brings in an actress to teach an inmate how to cry on the stand for his upcoming trial.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Drama. Crime. Maybe even horror, depending on the director.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

It offers up three fantastic roles for actors. And it can be shot all in one location.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Intense acting.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

It’s a tie between Popeye, Natural Born Killers, and Hamlet Maybe Macbeth too.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I’ve done touchups on it for several years now.

7. How many stories have you written?

Oh my God, a lot. I’m prolific as hell. Just do an internet search under “Ron Riekki” and you’ll see a bunch of my writing, and that’s just the online published writing.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

That’s probably a tie between Don Henley’s “Boys of Summer,” The Mummers’ “March of the Dawn,” Slayer’s “Angel of Death,” Elliott Smith’s “Between the Bars,” Hector Berlioz’s “Songe d’une nuit du sabbat,” Ice Cube’s “AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted,” Loco Locass’ “La censure pour l’echafaud,” and The Dead Milkmen’s “Big Time Operator.” But Petos’ “Asian Ytimessa” is closing in on that list, as is Grimes’ “Oblivion,” and Amoc’s “Kiallaseh.” But that’s when I can control what I’m listening to. In reality it’s probably a bunch of horrible songs that always get played on the radio; I’ve been known to block my ears in grocery stores to try to avoid the worst of songs.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I didn’t have obstacles to finish it. I really like to write so I’m not big into writer’s block. It must be fun for people who have it though. They get to work harder for the finish line. it tends to pour out of me. I think the hardest thing, come to think of it, was that I didn’t have a computer at the time, so I had to borrow one from a friend and write when they were asleep.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Basketball, my girlfriend, learning about medicine, teaching, nature, and Saami and Karelian and Finn culture.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

They rule.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

It seemed like a cool festival. And it is. Thank you for selecting my play. As far as feedback for the play, I didn’t know how to incorporate more backstory, so I left it as is so that I could hear it read. Kelly, in particular, did a great job of letting me hear the voice out loud, but everyone with your festival is great. Thank you to the cast and crew. Thank you very much.
 

Genre: Thriller, Drama

A lawyer has an award-winning actress come into a prison to teach his client how to cry on the stand.

CAST LIST:

Lawyer: Shawn Devlin
Narrator: Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Leeann: Kelly Seo
Teej: Abbas Wahab

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Winning Screenwriter Meg Bowen (LOVERS IN PARADISE)

July 2018 1st Scene Screenplay Winner.

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Meg Bowen: At it’s simplest, Lovers in Paradise is about apprehensive bank robbers who are at the end of their rope. When a job goes badly, they’re finally given a choice: do you continue on the only path they’ve ever really known, or do you walk away and learn to rebuild yourself from the ground up?

Which, at least to me, in my late teens and into my early twenties, was a big question that I would ask myself pretty regularly.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I’d likely classify this script as Action/Romance.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I think that this screenplay should be made into a movie because, besides being fun and visually interesting, I had a lot to say with this movie. I think that, at face value, it will still be entertaining, with an added layer of what it means to work through abuse and oppression and come out as a survivor on the other side.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Found family.

And I know that generally, the point of describing something as concisely as with two words, is that you don’t add a caveat, but I’m going to add that caveat here anyway because you don’t get to really see in my opening sequence. I think that, to a lot of people, struggling who you are and who you want to be, without what you feel is a solid support system is really scary. And when you go out into the world and you find somebody with the same life experiences, it can be a very transcendent and significant relationship to explore and nurture.

And that’s what this script becomes about. Under strange and unlikely circumstances, sometimes you find gold in the people that you meet.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’m a big rewatcher. So there are tons of movies that I’ve seen too many times to count. But it’s most likely Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

The idea for the opening sequence had been knocking about in my head for maybe a little over a year, but I didn’t really start to flesh out what the rest of the story might look like until about six months ago.

7. How many stories have you written?

I spent most of my undergrad writing for our uni magazine and other publications, so I’ve written a lot of stories over my life.

In terms of screenwriting, this is my first finished product!

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the
most times in your life?)

New Slang by The Shins. I heard it on the soundtrack of some pretentious movie, but I couldn’t let the song go.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Probably the easy answer here, but really just finding the time to physically sit down and write this thing out. I’ve been working in film and television for the last three years or so without very much time off between jobs, so I’ve found it really tough to find the time and motivation to write between long days on set and keeping myself emotionally happy enough to create art and stories that I’m proud of!

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I really do enjoy finding new things that I can really care about and dedicate my time to, so I’ve really never been short on hobbies and passions. Beyond writing, what’s really stuck with me since I was a kid has been sports and music. I played pretty high-level sports growing up so staying strong and fit has always been something that I cared about doing.

I’ve also been playing the guitar since I was in high school, so I try to keep that up as much as possible. Music is a bit of a layman’s passion for me, in that it’s something that I really enjoy doing, even if I’m not particularly good at it. Which really helps keep the pressure and existentialism off something that should always remain fun.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your
experiences working with the submission platform site?

I haven’t used to site too often, but it’s been really helpful in putting different contests and opportunities in front of me. It’s also very user-friendly and super easy to navigate.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings
on the initial feedback you received?

Opening sequences have always been so important to my enjoyment of any movie or tv show. So I’ve always paid close attention to how my own stories open and draw readers in. I thought that this was a very interesting festival because it would, very immediately, tell me if I’d drawn people in.

Possibly hearing my own words table read was also very cool to me. I’ve sat through a lot of table reads at work and I remember sitting through one of the first ones thinking just how awesome and surreal it would be to hear my own words read by talented actors. It was definitely something that I put on my Writer’s Bucket List.

The feedback I received was wonderful. You spend so much time with your stories, it’s always so refreshing to have someone else hold up a mirror to them. The feedback I received definitely helped me through the re-reads that came after entering this festival, trying to bring the rest of the script up to a level that I really happy with and proud of.
 

Genre: Romance, Crime, Action

A bank robbery goes awry and our two criminals have to steal a getaway car. Except there’s a girl tied up in the trunk, who might just be their best chance at walk-away money.

CAST LIST:

Janine: Alicia Payne
Kip: Dorian Shine
Narrator: Val Cole
Brad: Jolly Amoako
Juliette: Amrit Kaur

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.