Interview with Screenwriter 42 Tribes (Nyobaywa)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

42 Tribes: Slamdance created a logline:

Arcane Africa comes to life in this epic adventure of warring tribes and the shadow of the resurrected scorpion king who threatens them all

I like it. I prefer it to my log line:

Under the malaise of an apocalyptic desertification a cadre of spiritualist ‘resurrect’ a great king to exploit their power among ancient nations. Nations that will one day be known as Egypt and Sumer.

It’s a resurrection story, a monster story within a Multiple-Storyline story. It’s the first of a trilogy so the story doesn’t end. Well, one aspect ends.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Historical-Fiction/Fantasy
Like 300 with the more mundane Game of Thrones style of magic.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Egypt was a major beacon of human tech, civilization, and culture yet it gets no play. Its like Moses, Cleopatra, Aliens/sci-fi and the Mummy/horror with all of them whitewashed. Egyptians depicted themselves as people who would be considered black today by the standards of the many nations that define a black race yet black actors are like tokens. You would think they were supposed to be Greeks or Romans with the token blacks and tanned people who would be classified as white in the nations that have a defined white race.

It’s not just cosmetic though. Egyptian culture is compressed into an otherwise pale Brit with Snooki makeup wearing leopard skins and Xhosa collars.

Hollywood’s Egypt is a tired racist caricature that doesn’t seem willing to evolve. The story could be awesome but it’s still within a tired caricature. We have never seen unfiltered, primary source Nile Valley. No one has ever told the story about how this nation came into existence. I’m looking at the best story never told in the coolest setting never used and nobody is saying it or writing it for the big screen. I have a background in writing fiction so I asked “why not me?”. The story came to me from the culture. The core was immediate, but the total arc wasn’t complete until after like 5 rewrites which included a ‘separate take’ rewrite from the editor Prizecraft. I wanted to honor the culture and let is speak without any twist. I did not approach it half-ass. If I read what I wrote and didn’t like something, I changed it.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Long Overdue

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Watership Down. You re-watch a lot of cartoons as a kid but this one aged so well that I still watch it. One of my favorite novels too.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Around June 2015 to today. I’m doing another rewrite and I always planned to do another one after my Mdu Ntr teachers read it. Sebauniversity has to tear into it. Someone in the Amen Ra Squad has to read it. I’m stocking to visit the Nile for a rewrite in the presence of Hapi(Egyptian Nile God).

The ultimate goal is to produce the movie in old Egyptian with Middle or Bible English subtitles. There is a move to tighten the pronunciation of Egyptian words with comparative linguistics. I try to stay Facebookish with people in that movement.

7. How many stories have you written?

I wrote more as a kid. As an adult I have probably written like five or six. I’m more of a reader than a writer. I have to be motivated to write and obsessive to write well.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Guy – Goodbye Love

I don’t know why. Its such a sad song.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I had to really get into character like an actor. I had to become an ancient Nilote. I did a lot of research. I studied ancient Egypt for more than a year before I began outlining. I studied their genetics to the point where I became an activist. I did a video about how Wikipedia censored King Tut and his family’s ancestry results because they were too African. It was blatant but the “black media” is largely of the puppet variety. You can censor ancient Egyptian ancestry test and not only will the Ebony’s and World Star’s not check it they will ignore the ancestry test entirely. I would have said it was one of the last bastions of open racism when I was more naive. Seeing how thorough racism is changed the way I view everything. Its not just the present and future. White Supremacy goes back as far as it chooses to lay whatever foundation it needs. If Nyobaywa is produced it will be in the presence of millions of internet trolls with We wuz Kangz… and shit, comments/memes. I welcome it.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Family, fixing the damn near worthless African American religious institutions, reparations the influence of media. I’m also a gamer. My Madden game is cold, I coach youth football, will toss the dice in D&D and I appreciate a good strand of Americana ganja.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Scoreboard is scoreboard
7 Selected

18 Not Selected

1 Semi-Finalist

1 Award Winner

I’ll take it. I don’t have a ton of writing experience. To be featured in 7 contest, a semi-finalist in another and to win one shows that Nyobaywa is pretty nice right now. It will get better.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received

I need to sell it. I didn’t write Nyobaywa to read it. I knew that it would be an easier sell if it was featured in festivals.

Before Nyobaywa, I wrote a few scenes in feature script format. I didn’t have much experience with such criticism. I put in a lot of time and research etc. I was invested enough to where it’s difficult to accept criticism or trust praise. It’s like when you get your test results and you don’t want to look at the grade, but you do want to argue with the review. I had to humble myself and soak everything in, review it and make changes even if the change was a clarification of why I doubled down/kept something. What I’m saying, is sometimes you must change things and sometimes you have to just be better at what you aren’t changing.  

A FilmFreeway preferred festival:

CAST LIST:

Darega – Kevin Gabel
Tefnut – Ariel Brooker
Narration – Regan Brown
Ha-Eko – Allen Michael Brunet
HeruVenGulGah – Hartley O. Gyamfi
Okala – Georgia Grant

 

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Interview with Screenwriter Rita Martinos (ON THE VERGE)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Rita Martinos: A 26-year old Lebanese Muslim faces an internal cultural struggle while living in New York City, motivating her American roommate to travel to the Middle East, seeking a better understanding behind her friend’s suicidal escape.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Drama.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

It’s important to be aware of the differences between cultures and how people from different parts of the world – or even different parts of a country – are brought up. Those who struggle with their own identity sometimes believe there is no way out of the world they were raised in, and at times may be, as an example, disowned by their families if they choose a different path. This mainly stems from a lack of communication: children who are afraid to speak, parents who are stubborn to listen. Yet one of the strongest forms of fighting for a better world is learning to listen to each other, despite any disagreements. Instead of saying, “That’s wrong,” we should learn to dig into the internal reasons behind people’s beliefs, and be open to letting them discover our own. In this way, we can learn to understand each other better, without feeling the need to force what we view as the “correct” way of thinking. That simple act of listening without impulsive reaction, can help build a better future.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Cultural Exploration.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

“Fight Club” directed by David Fincher, or “Memento” by Christopher Nolan.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I started the script in 2014 as a short, 40-page version. I was then inspired to develop the story further. However, I have taken very long breaks before going back into the story, where I would reread the whole script and choose to make a few necessary changes at a time. This script is therefore still in development, which is why I was motivated to submit to the Female Film Festival and receive feedback of how another reader views the story.

7. How many stories have you written?

I write many short stories, and short screenplays and theater plays. “On the Verge” is the only feature screenplay I have written to date.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

That is a very difficult question, as I listen to a lot of different music, from oldies to classical music to pretty much anything depending on my mood for the day. My favorite artist, however – and what I tend to listen to most – is Metallica. Also, when I read plays, I very often listen to Clint Mansell’s “Lux Aeterna” on repeat – I find it gives me great focus.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I have been struggling to create a well-rounded aspect of the cultural differences. As a Christian Lebanese who’s lived abroad most of her life, I’ve faced a lot of different cultures and religions (as well as racism and injustice), yet that makes me feel like I am, for lack of better wording, not “fluent” in any particular culture. For this reason, I find that I need to constantly research and read in order to give this screenplay the magic that I feel it’s missing. When I decided to turn this into a feature screenplay, I was aware of the obstacles and gave myself a 5-year deadline with sufficient breaks, before I should decide to let it be. As a writer, I understand that if you are trying to perfect something, you’ll never feel it’s complete. I have let the screenplay breathe for extended periods of time, in order to see it with fresh eyes, but it’s time to start wrapping it up. And in terms of my deadline, I think it is safe to say I am right on track!

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am passionate about directing narratives. I work professionally as a Producer/Director and Editor for TVCs, documentaries, corporate videos, etc. Wherever I find the time and opportunity, I try to either write or direct either for theater or film. As an artist, I enjoy wearing different hats, and I believe many creative minds are similar that way, which is why we learn to support each other in these fields. We do what we love, and we’re lucky to have the opportunity to do that.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Submission platform sites such as FilmFreeway are incredibly useful into bringing festivals to you. I’ve discovered so many festivals I most likely wouldn’t have found on my own, and this expands my range of opportunities.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Well, the title of the festival is enough to know what’s influenced me. Supporting female artists is a beautiful thing, an opportunity than was rarely available in the past. To receive feedback is the cherry on top. The initial feedback I received was truly inspiring. As I’ve mentioned, I’ve let my script breathe for a while now, and this feedback has inspired me to take this script to the next level.

A Film Freeway Preferred Festival:

Following her roommate’s suicide, Lily is inspired by Salma to take a trip outside the United States and explore a foreign culture in Lebanon.

CAST LIST: 

Lily – Elizabeth Rose Morriss
Narration – Shawn Devlin
Theo – Sean Ballantyne
Salma – Katelyn Varadi

Interview with Screenwriter M.V. Montgomery (DON-JOHN’S DISAPPOINTED MAM)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your script about?

M.V. Montgomery: It’s a contemporary “Christmas Carol” featuring a Trump-like central character as a retired Scrooge who receives three visits from the ghost of his Scottish immigrant mother.

2. What genres does your script fall under?

Drama, black comedy, political satire.

3. Why should this script be produced?

It holds up as topical satire but is also intended as a celebration of Scottish language and culture. It could be a holiday episode of “The President Show” or SNL, or be staged live as part of a Gaelic festival.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

“Dead brilliant.” Dead, because the title character is a ghost.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Citizen Kane. The opening of “Don-John” is an homage to Welles’ movie, featuring a dropped glass and the same spoken word: “Rosebud.”

6. How long have you been working on this script?

It has been a light, on-and-off revision of a couple of months, primarily to reformat “Don-John” for stage, screen, and TV. The script has won honors in all three of these categories.

7. What obstacles did you face to finish this script?

No real obstacles, but I had to include a disclaimer that “Don-John’s Disappointed Mam” is a work of fiction, and any resemblance to actual presidents living or dead is purely coincidental.

8. What influenced you to enter the festival?

I was pleased with the performances for my script “Punker and Prophet,” which had been entered earlier this summer through LGBT Toronto. And I was interested to see what your ensemble cast might do with “Don-John,” too, since WILDsound seems to have no shortage of Scottish actors.

9. What were your feelings on the script reading?

Although the opening stage directions were missed, overall, I was quite happy with the result. I thought Mandy May Cheetham handled the central character’s difficult brogue fairly well, and I appreciated many of the artistic choices that she and John Leung made on the spur of the moment.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I’d say the Minnesota Vikings, but that passion runs hot and cold.

Submit via FilmFreeway:

CAST LIST:

Mam: Mandy May Cheetham
Narrator: Adrian Currie
Don John: John Leung
Rosa: Anjelica Alejandro

Interview with Screenwriter Colleen Asbury (The Dance of the Desert Mermaids)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Colleen Asbury: An older man stumbles through the desert, lost. He has no idea where he is or how he got there; he is just pulled by the silky siren song of the Desert Mermaids. He doesn’t know they are there, and when they appear after he spits a mouthful of water at the bottom of the dune, he is transfixed. He spends one final night on earth with them, a beautiful, wild night, before he is turned into a cactus. One of the last shots is of many other cacti dotting the dunes, which were other victims also pulled in by the soft, sighing singing of the Desert Mermaids.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Fantasy.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I hope the visuals are unique, and everyone has some sort of attachment to a significant rite of passage in their lives, so hopefully it will resonate on a deep level with people.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Magic Realism.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Amadeus.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I first wrote it as a short story a million years ago (in 1992) when there were still niche literary magazines and the Internet was a hazy thing that only computer people talked about. I sent it out to every fantasy magazine I could find, including one that fit the story to a “T.” But they rejected it, and after a few years of rejections from similar places, I put the dot-matrix copy in a box and didn’t think much about it. About ten years later, I retyped it into my desktop computer and saved it on a floppy disk. Every time I got a new computer, I transferred it, from floppy disk to hard disk to thumb drive to cloud. Then, about 25 years from the original writing of the story, I was staying with my elderly father in his Assisted Living apartment and the Internet went out. He went to bed at 7 p.m. and there was literally nothing to do. So, I pulled out the Desert Mermaid story and just practice turned into into a short screenplay. It was just an exercise, because for years I had rather pretentiously tried to be a “literary” writer and had no idea that short screenplays were a “thing,” so for me it was just practice. (I had recently taken a class called Screenplay Writing 101 at a community college and was just trying to get used to the formatting, etc.) No one had ever wanted the story in any form, but I liked it and hoped that someday there would be a way to get it out into the world.

7. How many stories have you written?

Dozens and dozens.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

I have a weird thing with music in that I will listen to the same song about 100 times in a row and love it each time as if hearing it anew. Then my brain fixates on another song. And then another. Recently, I went through a week of listening nonstop to Blossom Dearie singing, “Surrey With a Fringe On Top,” and then it was Franz Schubert’s “Duetsche Messe – Zum Sanctus – Heilig, heilig,” which I heard on “The Leftovers” and fell in love with, and this week it’s been George Harrison singing “My Sweet Lord.”

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

There was no home for this. No one wanted it. No one seemed to like it in ANY form. The few people who had read it back when I sent it out to zines had little to say other than the standard, “It’s not right for us.” The couple of friends who had read it when it was a story were polite and one said some of the visuals stayed with her, but there was zero enthusiasm from anyone. The only feedback I got from more mainstream places was that it “didn’t fit a niche,” and when I would (kind of jokingly) say, “You should create a niche, then,” they all said, “This is REAL life, not the movies.” So, if this ever ends up as a finished movie, I will be very pleased and probably do a lot of private laughing.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Being a Reiki Master and healer, music, art, travel, literature, really good food and wine, my two fat rescue cats, kindness, compassion, fairness, justice, and creating an interior and exterior environment of peace and harmony.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Good!

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I admit that I saw the word “Fantasy” and thought, “AHA!” I was thrilled because I thought that finally people who loved fantasy and visuals as much as I did could take a look at it and give me feedback. I entered three short screenplays and the feedback I received from these folks was incredible. It felt like this was the first time that anyone had really, truly READ the Desert Mermaids, taken it in, and then gave real, honest, mind-blowing feedback to me. The feedback on the other two screenplays was just as good, though whomever read one of them really didn’t “get” it, but their insights were still incredible and I am very grateful. I am beyond thrilled that knowledgeable, passionate, literate people at this festival read my stuff and gave such insightful feedback. This is a dream come true.

A FilmFreeway preferred festival:

A weary traveler enlists the help of Desert Mermaids that help guide soften his passing into the next phase of his life, which is being a cactus.

Narrator: Mandy May Cheetham

Interview with Screenwriter Chloë J. Hightower (Monochrome)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

. My script is about a Creole-American woman and a Japanese-American man who move to California together to escape their pasts in Lousiana. But when their house gets invaded by a gang of extremists, they must hide in their haunted basement, which taunts them with their traumatic pasts.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

The genre that my script falls under is horror, psychological thriller, and drama.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This screenplay should be made into a movie because it displays the experiences of people who are undervalued by Hollywood. With a black female lead and an Asian male lead, both who suffer from mental illness, displaying these elements on screen could humanize and normalize people of these ethnicities and people who are challenged with these mental illnesses. I also believe that when hate crime and rape is displayed on the movie screen, it is of course seen as sad and depressing event that doesn’t strengthen the character. However, as a victim of both, and as the writer of a film that includes these events, audiences need to know how terrifying hate crime and rape could be and how the victims of these attacks are strong in dealing with them, not pathetic. Especially in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Dark & tragic.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’ve probably seen Forrest Gump & Shawshank Redemption the most times. I don’t know how many to be honest, but I’ve memorized all the lines for both!

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I am in my freshman year of college. So, I would say that I thought of the idea in sophomore year of high school and started writing at the end of junior year and finished in my second semester of senior year.

7. How many stories have you written?

I have written about five stories, but I often procrastinate so this is the first script that I fully finished.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the
most times in your life?)

September by Earth, Wind, and Fire. That song is my childhood, and it always makes me happy when I listen to it.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Most of the script takes place in one setting (which is the cellar). So I struggled in figuring out rising actions that could progress the story.


10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I want to be an actress and director above anything else. I wish to act in and direct Monochrome as well when it gets picked up. I am also passionate about promoting diversity in Hollywood without forcing it. It’s essential that everyone feels represented, but I wouldn’t want to put a POC in a film just for diversity points. I want to tell their whole story as well. If I make a movie with someone of Cherokee descent, I want to display their beautiful culture as well (which will be anchored by vast amounts of research).

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your
experiences working with the submission platform site?

I found FilmFreeway to be a helpful and straightforward website to submit my script.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings
on the initial feedback you received?

The feedback that I received was very constructive, and I was able to apply it to my script. It also helped me in how I would direct Monochrome.

 

Refugees of racial violence in the 70s, an interracial couple finds themselves stuck in their haunted basement when a gang of anti-war extremists invades their new California home.

CAST LIST:

Female Detective: Mandy May Cheetham
Male Detective: Adrian Currie
Narrator: Liam Kinahan
Jennifer: Anjelica Alejandro
Police Officer: John Leung

Submit your Film & Screenplay via FilmFreeway:

Interview with Screenwriter Travis Darkow (HOW DID WE GET HERE?)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Travis Darkow: It’s about two lazy best friends who desperately want out of their jobs, but don’t really have any ambitions or talent. At it’s core I think it’s really about the dreamer in all of us who fantasize about a better job and a better life, just layered with ridiculous and sometimes (most of the time) over the top situations.
-Travis

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

We feel that this premise and these characters have so much potential to make a solid half hour comedy series. following these two guys who, over time will grow up in some ways, and hilariously stay the same in others, paired with our weird sense of humor, could lend itself to a quirky little series of misfortunes as well as triumphs for these two characters.
-Travis

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Absurd and Absurd

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Nightmare Before Christmas or The Sandlot
-Travis

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

We came up with the general idea about 4 or 5 months ago, and a week after we came up with the idea we had the first draft of the pilot done. We are currently working on the second draft using the suggestions and insight we got from you guys.
-Travis

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written around 15 to 20 short scripts, some of which I took and shot myself as short films, others I’m working on getting produced. I have been getting great feedback and interest from the festival circuit with 4 or so of my short horror screenplays. I am also working on a handful of original feature length screenplays as well.
-Travis

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

It changes day to day, but if I had to choose I would probably say Everlong by Foo Fighters
-Travis

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Honestly the pilot script flowed pretty easily once we locked down the idea of what we wanted to do. Pretty much everything in the pilot comes from our weird sense of humor and even jokes we have. It felt very natural, because it was basically writing down the ridiculous way we think and joke with each other. Once we get going it’s tough to stop us.
-Travis

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am passionate about all types of writing, I write poetry and short stories. But I am very passionate about directing and actually going out and shooting short films, even if they’re just little no budget movies that hardly anyone will see. I’m obsessed with the entire process, from one tiny idea, to writing it out, shooting it and then editing it all together. It’s truly my passion. I also just love to spend time with friends and family, and I love to make music as well.
-Travis

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It’s been fantastic, I absolutely love FilmFreeway. It’s so user friendly and helpful to be able to see and manage all of your projects through one platform. nothing but good things to say about it.
-Travis

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

We just wanted to get our idea for this series out there, and try to get feedback on what works, what doesn’t work, what can be tweaked, and we have gotten really great feedback so far. It’s always nice to get feedback where you can tell the person actually read your script and put some effort in to their thoughts on the project. Unfortunately that’s not always the case with responses from film festivals, but your guy’s feedback has been excellent, and we’re excited to send in the 2nd draft as soon as it’s done.
-Travis
 

‘Geraldine Hall’ is a Gothic Horror Fiction script, that emphasises on the unease of two orphan children, a brother and sister, as they’re adopted to Geraldine Hall, and the terror into which it quickly changes.

CAST LIST:

Charlie: Liam Kinahan
Stuart: John Leung
Narrator: Adrian Currie
Miss Bethany: Anjelica Alejandro
Mary Ann: Mandy May Cheetham

Submit exclusively via Film Freeway:

Interview with Debasree Banerjee (GERALDINE HALL)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Debasree Banerjee: The script is a Gothic Horror with elements of neo-noir. It focusses on the story of two orphans who’re adopted to Geraldine Hall, a vast labyrinthine manor house, with a dark and mysterious past.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror, Thriller, Gothic Fiction, Noir, Neo-noir

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

This screenplay, if taken up for cinematic adaptation, would require very little props and outdoor locations, i.e. it can literally be filmed on shoe-string budgets. Moreover, with films like ‘Get Out’ being nominated in Best Movies category, the trend of horror movies catching up with dramas or romantic fictions, is obvious. I feel, this is the right time for launching this script, with the audience taking more interest in a plethora of movies from the Horror genre.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Arresting and identifiable

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

I’ve literally been a cinephile for the most part of my adult life, and have enjoyed watching thousands of films in over a hundred languages (with subtitles, of course). Nonetheless, some of the ones I’ve watched more than ten times are – ‘The Exorcist’, ‘The Bridges of Madison County’, ‘Les Choristes’ (The Chorus, in English), ‘Nove Cento’, ‘Million Dollar Baby’, ‘Chinatown’, ‘The Shining’, ‘Shutter Island’, ‘Sophie’s Choice’, ‘The English Patient’, ‘Ladri di Biciclette’, ‘To kill a Mockingbird’, ‘Million Dollar Baby’ etc…. The list is long.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

This was one of the scripts on which I worked comparatively for a much shorter period of time. There are other projects which are period dramas, or historical fictions, and they require years of researching.

7. How many stories have you written?

I’ve written hundreds of stories, many of which have been internationally published.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

My all-time favourite song has been ‘Purano Shei Diner Katha’ by Rabindranath Tagore, a song that speaks of olden times, or lost times that each one of us leaves behind, but that, which always tug at our hearts due to their simplicity. incidentally, the tune is inspired to an extent by ‘Auld Lang Syne’.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

None. I remember having picked up the idea and working out everything within only a couple of days. I feel horror and thriller are my genres; they come naturally to me.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Singing, films, cooking, travelling, philosophy, spirituality.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

‘Film Freeway’ is a God-send platform for people like me, who’ve a bagful of finished / nearly finished/ unfinished projects at hand, but who don’t have access to agents, or don’t know who to approach with their work, or are geographically located far-away. My experience of having availed your services has been awesome, and I’d like to thank Film Freeway for their kind support and excellent liaison.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Los Angeles, for someone who is living maybe, more than 8K Miles away, is synonymous with Hollywood, which is again another name for the factory of Dreams, that has enthralled and enticed most of us, sometime during our lives. It was therefore my desire to submit my script to the seat of my inspiration, i.e. Los Angeles. Moreover, the additional allure of having a professional feedback, was something the couldn’t be overlooked. But to be frank, I never expected such a thorough feedback, which clearly showed that someone had actually taken the pains of having read and re-read my script! Neither did I expect such a prompt response. I’m very happy to have learnt about your film festival, and look forward to submitting my other scripts as well.
 

‘Geraldine Hall’ is a Gothic Horror Fiction script, that emphasises on the unease of two orphan children, a brother and sister, as they’re adopted to Geraldine Hall, and the terror into which it quickly changes.

CAST LIST:

Charlie: Liam Kinahan
Stuart: John Leung
Narrator: Adrian Currie
Miss Bethany: Anjelica Alejandro
Mary Ann: Mandy May Cheetham

Submit exclusively via Film Freeway: