Interview with Screenwriter Lance Barnett (CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM)

1. What is your screenplay about?

Larry gets a phone call from his old friend, NFL Network legend, Rich Eisner. He is asked to attend Colin Kaepernick’s press conference revealing his new Athletic Shoe; by Colin’s request. Larry causes an uproar when he inadvertently takes a knee at the event. Anchovies and Humble pie save the day.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy

3. How does this script fit into the context of the show?

It wonderfully fits Larry David’s world view, and the characters are true to form.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Pure Larry

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Godfather

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Two weeks

7. How many stories have you written?

Stories is hard to say exactly, perhaps 30. Screenplays, including teleplays and TV episodes, approximate 17.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Unfortunately, “Happy Birthday to You”. I would say my favorite would be “Message of Love” by Jimi Hendrix and his Band of Gypsy’s album Live from the Fillmore East, January 1, 1970.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I wouldn’t refer to it as an obstacle, but I edited the original draft down to 30 pages from 35.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

God, guitar, seeking to understand various aspects of human nature, making a positive difference in the lives of those I care the most about, and those in need whom I can personally help in whatever form or fashion.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

FilmFreeway is a great tool to aspiring screenwriters. Easy to use and presents many viable opportunities for exposure and hopefully success.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I had the idea vaguely floating around in my head, but had no intention of putting pen to paper so to speak until I saw the festival advertised on FilmFreeway. What really cemented the deal for me was getting guaranteed feedback, which was much to my delight, outstanding in pointing out both the positive and negative aspects from the perspective of the reader. He was quite knowledgeable on the subject of Larry David, his critique was outstanding, useful, and caring. Quite a deal, considering the more than reasonable submission fee, irregardless of the final outcome.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

Larry gets a phone call from his old friend, NFL Network legend, Rich Eisner. He is asked to attend Colin Kaepernick’s press conference revealing his new Athletic Shoe; by Colin’s request. Larry causes an uproar when he inadvertently takes a knee at the event. Anchovies and Humble pie save the day.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Hannah Ehman
Richard Lewis: Shawn Devlin
Larry: Steve Rizzo
Mail Courier: Kyana Teresa

Interview with Poet Shannie Alvarez (IN THE GARDEN)

1) What is the theme of your poem?

The theme is Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. There are two trees: One tree is called the tree of life, this is Adam. The other tree is called the tree of good and evil, who is Eve.

2) What motivated you to write this poem?

I really believe this poem was inspired by God. I wrote it last year and it makes more sense to me this year.

3) How long have you been writing poetry?

Since I was 25 yrs old.

4) If you could have dinner with one person (dead or alive), who would that be?

Jesus in the physical.

5) What influenced you to submit to have your poetry performed by a professional actor?

I really like this poem and I hope others will be encouraged by it as it encourages me. I speak further about this poem in everything that I write. I believe that Adam and Eve are now the Jews and the Gentiles. Their relationship is much like the man and the woman. We learn together like all the other opposites: darkness versus light, physical versus spiritual, good versus bad. Then you have the man and the woman. When we learn the Divine love; relationship and it’s balance, that is when we see God and know all His truths.

6) Do you write other works? scripts? Short Stories? Etc..?

If you want to do a movie for me about this vision I have about the above. I would love to expand on it in further detail with you so that we can get it just right.

7) What is your passion in life?

To give the world hope that there is more to life than just the mundane. We are all interconnected and if we understand our deeper, truer selves; we would identify with a passionate love for one another to finally be content about who we really are.

Watch the Poetry Reading:

Performed by Julie Sheppard

Interview with Screenwriter Frank Hays (VINCENT AND PAUL: UNSPOKEN BROTHERHOOD)

1. What is your screenplay about?

Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood is a biographical drama about the tumultuous relationship between Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. The screenplay delves into the homosexual relationship between Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Wow, it’s hard to pinpoint one genre for Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood. In order, I would say, period drama, thriller, and biographical.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Why should this script be made into a movie? Well, for one, everyone has misunderstood Vincent van Gogh. He was a caring person who loved life. He wasn’t just a historical figure that went crazy and severed his ear.

I love Vincent van Gogh and all his paintings. My partner and I traveled to Amsterdam this past February to visit the Van Gogh Museum. I needed to see his paintings and understand him. I wanted to know what caused his illness and why he fell into a deep, dark depression. The more I researched his life, the more I realized there was an untold story.

Historians have said that Vincent van Gogh had periods of homosexuality. It’s been written or hinted that Vincent had a homosexual relationship with Paul Gauguin. This screenplay is about the demise of Vincent van Gogh at the hands of Paul Gauguin.

Some museums are now boycotting Paul Gauguin’s art and legacy because he was a complicated, driven, callous person who used and hurt many people to propel his career. I think Paul used Vincent van Gogh. He preyed upon his mental illness and affection.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Highly Disturbing.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Wizard of Oz.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Nine months. I came home from Amsterdam, and COVID-19 happened. I’ve been working on Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood continuously through-out the pandemic.

7. How many stories have you written?

Other than Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood, I have written La Famiglia (The Family), a gay Italian immigrant who goes on the run after being accused of impersonating a United States citizen by a Homeland Security officer. Circus Animals, a group of animals band together on a frightening, dangerous journey to find their stolen friends. The Apparition, about a divorced father who must protect his children from an aggressive female ghost after moving into a historic mansion, and last, the Browne’s Addition series. Browne’s Addition is an episodic series that explores the lives of a group of gay friends. It’s a cross between Tales of the City and Queer as Folk.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

With Every Heartbeat. I love Robyn and everything she does.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I retired from 36 years of Federal service, so I had no obstacles. Other than my family needs, Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood was my number one priority.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

My family.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

FilmFreeway is a fantastic platform for screenwriters and film directors. It’s a one-stop-shop for submitting to festivals – the process is easy!

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

My initial feedback was, wow! The first paragraph I read said, Congrats! Your screenplay is a winner. We will perform a 2 -6 page scene reading of your script at an upcoming October or November 2020 Festival. The narrative/composition was concise and professional. The reader was attentive and forthcoming. I felt the reader had my best interest at heart.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

Vincent and Paul: Unspoken Brotherhood is a biographical drama about the tumultuous relationship between Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. Historians and biographers agree that Vincent van Gogh’s adulthood included periods of hypersexuality, hyposexuality, bisexuality, and homosexuality. This screenplay delves into the homosexual relationship between Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Julie Sheppard
Etienne-Lucien Martin: Bill Poulin
Vincent Van Gogh: Geoff Mays
Diner/Paul Gauguin: Steve Rizzo

Interview with Screenwriter Patrick McGrath (PARALLEL UNIVERSE)

1) What was your screenplay about?

About being competed. I found out I had a brother I never knew about. We finally met. ( It turned out years earlier , we had been living about a mile away from each other in San Diego, and I was about to enroll at San Diego State (where he was attending) and study film and television (which was also my brother’s major) But it didn’t happen, My girlfriend and I broke up, and I quit my job, so I went back to Santa Barbara. Hence the name ” Parallel Universe”.

2) What genres does your screenplay follow under?

A cross between a fish out of water and a romantic screwball comedy, with a little action adventure thrown in,

3) Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Because it will make you laugh.

4) How would you describe the script in two words?

Inspired lunacy.

5) What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

American Beauty.

6) How long have you been working on this screenplay?

On and off for about two years.

7) How many other stories have you written?

In the past five years, three other film scripts and a tv pilot.

8) What is your favorite song?

“Acid Tongue” by Jenny Lewis.

9) What obstacles did you have to finish this screenplay?

It had been percolating in my head for years, but Alex was a challenge..

10) Apart from writing, what are you passionate about?

Film and Baseball.

11) You entered your screenplay via Film Freeway. What has been your experience working with your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Pretty easy. No problems.

12) What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Very flattered. I’m glad people like it. As far as entering, it was a wing and prayer, but I’m very happy with the results,

Interview with Screenwriter Russell Knight (HORIZON CALLING)

1. What is your screenplay about?

It’s about a young man called Jim who lives in Melbourne, Australia. His life is pretty tragic following the death of his older brother, the shining star of the family. He holds himself accountable for the death as he feels he should have done more to save his brother when he slipped from a cliff whilst out hiking. It was too much for their father who soon left and his mum turned to the bottle. Life is bleak and Jim’s clearly tragically low in mood when two years later his dad contacts him out of the blue to invite him on a sailing trip from Australia to Indonesia. Little does Jim know of his father’s twin motives for inviting him along. One is genuine and heartfelt, but the other is the ominous mystery which reveals itself as we go along. He meets Emma on the bus journey to Darwin who provides far more to the story than just being a love interest. Together they learn the dangerous truth which culminates in them fighting for their lives against international smugglers.

On the face of it is a reluctant adventure story, but the subplots, metaphors for Jim’s guilt, and messaging about the importance of fatherhood, hopefully give it more depth and soul.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I’d say it cuts across a few – adventure/drama/thriller/mystery, and one script consultant suggested it falls under noir too.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I think it has quite a broad appeal and a reasonable message underneath, could be very cinematic, and with a small cast and isolated set pieces, could be quite tense until the big bang third act. It’s about that regular guy who doesn’t seek adventure, romance, and danger, but it finds him. All he wants is acceptance from his estranged father and by taking the trip, he hopes for some kind of forgiveness from his dead brother. The guy is broken, and hopes he can be put back together again. Clearly the money is the external factor which drives him on the trip. Also, it has some clearly different visual stimuli, starting off in a city, then the outback, then the ocean, then a tropical island. All places that can be eye candy. We go on that external and also internal journey with Jim and we have some interesting characters, all with their own agendas for being on that boat which we only really find about when it’s too late to get off!

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Danger & Romance (ok, I cheated with the &)

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Probably Training Day. I love the journey officer Jake Hoyt goes on. So tense, and Denzel is clearly awesome in it.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

I started at the beginning of lockdown in April and the first draft probably took 8 weeks and I’ve been refining on and off since. The actual concept for the story came to me 20 years ago whilst I was backpacking around australia with my guitar. I was on a boat sailing around the Whitsunday Islands and ideas started formulating.

7. How many stories have you written?

This is the first thing I’ve ever written.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Wow, that is too difficult! There are so many, but a song which has inspired me a lot is Unfinished Sympathy by Massive Attack.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

The main one was ensuring that my wife didn’t feel second best to the writing. I specifically bought a laptop so that I could write whilst sat next to her on the couch on an evening when she watched Netflix or similar. If I hadn’t, our main computer is upstairs and I just know I would have got it in the neck for never being present. Making the decision to get the laptop (which I didn’t really need otherwise) was what made me not only start, but finish the script. It actually turned out to be a great investment as most evenings I would ask her to read the 2 or 3 pages which I had written so she came along on the journey with me. She turned out to be a pretty good critic and barometer of what was working and what wasn’t.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I don’t know about passion, but my other hobby is songwriting and music production. I have music released on record labels and a lot of online followers who have provided lovely comments, but after the initial creation of the composition, the hard work of production, layering, mixing, mastering, etc. gets pretty tedious. I found writing this script to be freeing. It was just my brain, my fingers, and the written word.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

Mixed if I’m honest. I think the platform itself is great, but the responses of some of the competitions arrive way past the notifications which is a little disappointing. Thankfully that wasn’t the case with you guys!!

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

Receiving the email from you guys was awesome, truly. I specifically entered your competition as it was genre specific which I guess a) narrows down the field of competition, but b) means that the people reading and judging want to read your type of story and will likely be more passionate for what is to come. In other competitions it might be that the person reading your script is a huge sci-fi fan and doesn’t really want to be reading your drama/mystery/thriller.

Yours was also the first competition to provide written feedback, and I can’t tell you the amount of times I read it back. Over and over. I’m guessing that most people who enter a competition love their story, and to have someone else love it too is extremely rewarding. I loved how the feedback was specific and really demonstrated that time had been spent getting into the theme, characters, etc. A lot of thought and reflection went into those comments and I truly appreciate it. Winning has just been the icing on the cake and gives me great confidence and encouragement that the story is worth pushing and pursuing. It also won the Best First Time Screenwriter Award at the Festigious International Festival in August so to have it recognized twice is humbling.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

Following the death of his older brother, a dismayed young man travels through the outback to go on an ill-advised sailing trip with his estranged father and finds himself caught up in the violent world of international smuggling.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Steve Rizzo
Jim: Geoff Mays
Neil: Bill Poulin

Interview with Screenwriter Haley Rice (THE LAST GABLETON)

1. What is your screenplay about?

The Last Gableton takes place at the turn of the twentieth century and is the story of Hildegard Ashdown, an upperclass social pariah who finds herself pursued by Elijah Gableton, the son of a wealthy family. As things progress between them, it becomes clear that Elijah has a very dark secret and that his family will do whatever it takes to keep it.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

I consider The Last Gableton a Period drama.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Although set in the 1890s, The Last Gableton explores the idea of living a life free of pressures imposed by society and family— something to which everyone with a social media account can relate. The theme of secrecy in this piece and what we do to hide our truth we think others will reject us is especially cathartic when played out by characters in another place and time— a great example is The Queens Gambit which is trending on Netflix right now— I think that kind of escapism is what people are looking to get lost in.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Surprisingly unexpected.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

It’s a tie between Ever After or Wes Craven’s Scream trilogy.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

This is a first draft I started in April 2020 when I was quarantined in my parents barn for two weeks. I finished it in a couple months, entered it into a few festivals for feedback and now am letting it marinate before starting the second draft.

7. How many stories have you written?

Stories? Countless. Plays and screenplays? Only a couple that are in shape enough to let others read. I’m lucky to be a part of several writer’s groups that keep me writing and encouraged.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

“The Story” by Brandi Carlile

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

Really, not many— just self. Because of the pandemic, I was able to spend several hours a day with the piece; also, I meet weekly with the MCS writers group called The Writer’s Block, who gave helpful feedback and the motivation to finish my first feature script. During the pandemic, they’ve become some of my closest friends and have kept me sane and creating, and I’m so grateful for them.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

I am a musician by training, so I love creating music— I recently underscored my dear friend Alex Sims’ play This is For Us and had a blast; I also love to create and edit film with my fellow producers at Messy Stars Productions, and I occasionally love to get into intense political debates with my lame conservative family members on Facebook.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

It has been life-changing. It was so easy to upload the materials, and with a click of button I had access to industry people all over the world. This first draft has placed in several festivals that I never would’ve known about without this platform. I’m hooked.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

This is a hard one because I struggled with entering this festival because I am not a member of the LGBTQ community, but my script tells the stories of several LGBTQ characters in a time period in which those stories aren’t often told. I thought it was important to see these stories fleshed out, so I entered. I am so glad I did— the feedback from this festival is some of the most helpful, thoughtful, and thorough feedback I’ve ever received. The person who took the time to read and digest and analyze my piece made sure to highlight my strengths as writer while not shying away from things that didn’t work or weren’t serving the piece. I am left humbled and bettered for entering this festival.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

The Last Gableton, a dramatic feature set at the turn of the twentieth century, is the story of a young social pariah, Hildegard Ashdown, who finds herself pursued by the son of a wealthy family. As things progress between them, she begins to sense he has a dark secret, and his family will do what needs to be done to keep it.

CAST LIST:
Narrator: Shawn Devlin
Madeline: Julie Sheppard
Hildegard: Kyana Teresa

Interview with Screenwriter McCaleb Burnett (A VACATION)

1. What is your screenplay about?

A relationship in flux, and the strange circumstances in which they find themselves

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror, I suppose?

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I hope it’s very visual. The mis en scene tells much of the story of the voice we’re hearing.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Haunted relationship.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

The Parralax View or when Harry Met Sally.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Three months?

7. How many stories have you written?

6 or 7.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

That’s an impossible question. I suppose Strange Weather by Waits or Blue in Green from Miles Davis.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

COVID! And my own ineptitude.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

My work. I’ve been working as an actor for 20 years. My partner, who I’ve been with for most of this last decade. She is the best thing that’s happened to me. My dog, rooster. She loves us a lot.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

They have been great.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I am in a writers group with many folks more accomplished than me. They encouraged me. I think I’ve been a finalist in 7 or eight and won two. The feedback was incredibly useful.

Watch the Screenplay Reading:

A weekend away. What could be better?

CAST LIST:
Narration: Steve Rizzo
VO: Julie Sheppard
HE: Shawn Devlin
SHE: Kyana Teresa

Interview with Filmmaker Tom Tanquary (HAND DRAWN LIFE)

HAND DRAWN LIFE was the 2020 feature film DOCUMENTARY Festival winner.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

At an very early age I became aware of the comics, or funny pages in the paper. They were this wonderful world that came to the house every day. As I got older, I fell in love with Pogo. But I noticed the way Walter Kelly drew his characters they seemed familiar to me from TV news shows, which I also loved to watch. That connection made both the news and cartoons more interesting. I ended up in a career as a journalist and film maker. I just always wanted to give back to an art form that gave me so much joy, inspired my career, and still inspires my work to this day.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I started off just shooting “test” footage to get a work sample. From there I thought I could raise the cash to make it a real production. No one would give me money. But I met historian RC Harvey in the process. He was such a character I just had to keep going. That was 11 years ago. The film was shot on 6 different cameras and 5 different formats over the years. The post for it took 2 years alone.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Sequential art

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

It is easy to say money because that is what so many things come down to. But really it was access. Worming my way into such a private and insular society, and gaining their trust, took most of the time and effort. With few exceptions, these artists are very closed off from any semblance of celebrity. They work at home and live very ordinary lives. They are the ultimate observers and rarely the participants. And I was the ultimate outsider.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Of course, I was blown away by their comments. And I have to say, a bit surprised at how young they were. I wasn’t sure talking about such a seemingly old art form would have any meaning in this age of light speed communication. But they all showed a deep understanding of what I was trying to say/show. They could see how this form isn’t stagnant. That it changes and evolves with the times. That we are all truly hard wired to think and see in sequential art regardless of the medium. And that it takes a real talent to do it in 4 simple boxes and a few words. They got it.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Once I came to understand the relationship among the artist, the newspaper, and reader, I knew I had to just connect the dots. It made for a longer film but to truly appreciate the art form you needed to see it from a higher altitude, a bigger picture. The story had a natural beginning, middle and end with everything connected. It might be old fashioned to be that linear, but sometimes that’s the best way to explain something.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

It’s cliché but Citizen Kane. There are 100s of great movies out there but it always helps to review what so many consider the best… because perhaps it is.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s great there’s place like FilmFreeway to take so much of the work and frustration out of the submission process. Not to mention making us aware of all the festivals and outlets there are for our work. What a wonderful service.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

More than likely The Rolling Stones “Give Me Shelter.” It came out at a very transformative time in my life and sort of set the scene for the rest of it.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

There’s always another film in the works. I also have several production partners and we’re pitching shows and docs in Hollywood all the time. It’s what you do here. More importantly though, I’m now a professor at Chapman University’s Dodge film school. What I hope I’m doing there is inspiring young talent to reach for the impossible and create the next generation of master works.

Interview with Filmmaker Monique Lola Berkley (I HATE THIS FKN JOB)

I HATE THIS FKN JOB played to rave reviews at the November 2020 FEEDBACK Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I was motivated to make this film as a challenge to myself. As the film somewhat depicts pieces of my life I began to really take note that I wasn’t alone. I’d witness the disrespect of women of color throughout various business environments. It’s never cool and it was happening to me and I just decided to write about it and go the extra step and try filming it. I have a background in performing arts and so I am knowledgeable about producing a project. The challenge for me was getting actors/crew involved then securing locations and of course having the funds to pull it off.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The idea was born during the fall of 2017. I began to write the short and we began production in March of 2018. Post production was probably the biggest challenge but we got through during late fall of 2019.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Social comedy

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The post period was the most difficult unit to this short film. There were constant actor requests, hard drive issues, editing problems, personal and financial matters. I have a running joke that I’d like to share…”If you want to know who is really 100% in your corner…just make a film. I guarantee everyone you thought would support you (not financially) but in the ways human beings need support in life, they will fail to show up.” It’s eye-opening.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I felt a sense of gratitude. Having the audience understand the author’s plea to see Naima as a human being seeking a warranted place within the real world and not that we were shaming folks. However, sadly the real world isn’t quite ready for Naima’s contributions or her individuality and what makes her the dynamic, articulate, professional being that she is. The piece isn’t to humiliate a culture but hopefully open up those long overdue discussions.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea came from my personal work experiences but also the experiences of so many other hard working women of color that are out there in the workforce. Also, with a growing number of women directors emerging, I wanted to try my hand at directing a short film.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

So many of my faves such as: The Shining, Scarface, Carrie, The Color Purple and Purple Rain. No matter how many times I’ve seen them I always watch them every chance I get.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

With this being my first go-round, I find FilmFreeway to be a pretty easy portal. It houses your work, provides up to date details as well as helps to keep you informed of upcoming openings/deadlines, etc all important details for filmmakers. It keeps you on track. So FilmFreeway from my perspective is pretty amazing.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Any music by Michael Jackson or Marvin Gaye.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m working on Jamilah Speaks. This is a short to encourage teen entrepreneurship. It is important to start building the minds of our youth and provide vision for their life’s trajectory.

Interview with Filmmaker Rayan Cedric Haddad (THE SOURCE)

THE SOURCE was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the November 2020 STUDENT Feedback Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

The intention is to tell a Human Story, not Manichean, full of twists and turns in the dramaturgy, in which the main character evolves in a fairly short duration. While being faithful to the principle of treating with Coherence, Facts and Likelihood the subject of Hypnosis / Hypnotherapy.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Research, writing, filming, post-production, conclusion. 6 months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words?

Simple and Complex.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The Music. Major Element Emotionally expressing Tommy’s Transformation.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I am very Grateful, Honored, Touched, full of Confidence and Motivation in the Future for more Ambitious Projects to come. I am more and more Confident in the Future. Glad to receive you constructive Feedback from you with Benevolence and Professionalism.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

When I practiced Hypnosis with my mother and discovered these caring and transformative abilities. How the acceleration of the Transformation process can prove to be accomplished and observable in a very short period of time.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Too many Films. I can make an incomplete List.🎬🎥🎞
-The Shawshank Redemption (1994) from Frank Darabont. Symbol of Hope.
-The Green Mile (1999) from Frank Darabont.
-Forrest Gump (1994) from Robert Zemeckis.
-Fly Over a Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) from Milos Forman. Wonderful.
-The Silence of the Lambs (1991) from Jonathan Demme.
-Princess Mononoke (1997) from Hayao Miyazaki.
-Spider-Man (2002) / Spider-Man 2 (2004) from Sam Raimi. Movies Who Awakes the Superhero Inside Souls.
-Taxi Driver (1976) from Martin Scorsese.
Like I say. An incomplete list…😅

8. You submitted to the Festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings about the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

The Best way to start the submission with Benevolence, Conviction, Humility and Wisdom.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

There are too many songs that I have listened to and inspired my Life. Specially Movie Score Composer Soundtracks. And the List will be Incomplete again.🙂
O-Zone – Dragostea Din Tei
Bastille – Icarus
Linkin Park Songs – What I’ve Done / Numb / In the End / Breaking my Habits / Powerless
Coldplay – Talk / Hymn for the Weekend feat. Beyoncé
Indina Menzel – “A Hero Comes Home” from the Movie Beowulf (2007)
Etc…🎼🎵🎶

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Sure. I’m enthusiastic to make an adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Othello in the Modern era. Cinematography Adaptation into Movie Big Screen.