Interview with Filmmaker Nils Emil Nylander (ARINA)

ARINA was the winner of BEST DIRECTION at the August 2021 DANCE Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

Just for pure fun, really. I work as a commercial filmmaker and try to always have side projects where I can explore different ideas and feel free creatively.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I’d say 2 months probably from the first time we recorded the interview.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Moving meditation.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

To give myself time to finish it… It’s a delicate process to make something like this, it both gives energy and drains it. But everything else, like the actual shooting and music production came together like a puzzle.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Super cool! Really, really appreciated that. Having real people commenting like that was special.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

Like 8-9 years ago when quitting my full time job to pursue something more creative and free. Filmmaking seemed like an interesting choice, not obvious at all, but interesting. And so it happened.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably Stalker by Tarkovsky. And Top Gun.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Works well and you get a good overview over costs and alternatives.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Dal Bhat.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have a few short film ideas but at the moment I am immersed in becoming a yoga teacher actually. And shooting commercial films.

Interview with Animator/Filmmaker Johan Samuelsson (THE SHIFT)

THE SHIFT played to rave reviews at the August 2021 ANIMATION Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I mainly made It because I wanted develop my animation and illustration skills.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I started thinking, and writing the idea in the summer of 2017. But I did the majority of the work from late 2019 until now.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Dystopia and Utopia

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Doing almost everything on our own and to be patient and stay with the style and story over a long period of time.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Nervous, but at the same it got me motivated to develop this story further.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I started to make stop motion Lego films in the early 2000s, so probably around that time.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Star Wars Episode I – The Phantom Menace

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I think It’s really great to only have to set up the project once.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Burrito

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have a pitch and an outline for a longer version of The Shift. The goal would be to find a collaborator to join that project. In the meantime I want to study more illustration and animation for a little while.

Interview with Animators/Filmmakers Jerry van de Beek & Betsy De Fries (YELLOWSTONE 88 – SONG OF FIRE)

YELLOWSTONE 88 – SONG OF FIRE played to rave reviews at the August 2021 ANIMATION Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

JERRY: Our studio is located in California where we are now beset with ever increasing climate related fires and purple air quality from the smoke every year. Fire season begins earlier and finishes later with every year that passes. Yellowstone 88 was finished this year but has been in production for some time and the more research we did for the film the more we realized that the conditions that allowed that conflagration to happen are the same conditions we are seeing today. In our lifetime we will all be confronted with the effects of climate change.

What happened in Yellowstone Park is a great example of how we view and sometimes misunderstand large climate related events like fires. In 2018, exactly 30 years after the Yellowstone fires, the town of Paradise California was destroyed by a massive fire that claimed many lives. Although the specific cause of both fires was different the underlying agent was the same. In Yellowstone the fire was a predominantly a natural occurrence caused by dry lightning igniting the fuel of dead trees and dry brush. In Paradise the fire was started by a combination of strong winds and badly maintained electricity poles that ignited sparks. These same events and more are happening around the world every year as we fail to keep pace with climate change and the havoc it is wrecking.

We cannot and should not fight every fire. Here in North America we have to pay heed to the ways of the First Nation and Native American wisdom in managing the land. We have to learn when to fight and when to give back to nature so that life can be brought back into balance.

In the story of Yellowstone 88 we show how for the animals of the park there were not one but two catastrophic events. First came the fire. Instinctively animals know how to survive a fire – they move away, they seek water, they go underground and so comparatively few animals were lost in the conflagration. Next came a devastating winter snowstorm of unparalleled severity. This was welcomed as a major relief as it stopped the fires but for the animals the snow and its aftermath was the larger of their problems. During the conflagration that took over 1,500,000 perimeter acres, vegetation was scorched and burned away. It was when snow covered all that remained that thousands of animals starved and died.

BETSY: Our studio is located in California where we are now beset with ever increasing climate related fires and purple air quality from the smoke every year. Fire season begins earlier and finishes later with every year that passes. Yellowstone 88 was finished this year but has been in production for sometime and the more research we did for the film the more we realized that the conditions that allowed that conflagration to happen are the same conditions we are seeing today. In our lifetime we will all be confronted with the effects of climate change.

Perhaps the question that remains is what can we learn from these past events so that we can adjust and prepare for the future?

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

JERRY: At Little Fluffy Clouds we fund these short films ourselves. This means that we can only work on these projects in between other productions. As you can see on the credits the team is also very small with just one animator. It takes us at least 2 years to complete a short animation like this with a lot of big breaks in between. I don’t think that is a bad thing, it’s very interesting to take these breaks and then come back to the project and look at it again with fresh eyes. It’s easy to lose perspective when you work on your own projects. We did however revisit a lot of the scenes after those breaks and change them.

BETSY: Yellowstone 88 was finished this year but has been in production on and off for sometime.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

JERRY: Majestic – Humbling

BETSY: Evocative and magical!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

JERRY: Yellowstone 88 is really a short, animated documentary. We didn’t come up with the events of this story. A story like this one is extremely complicated and much larger than we could ever tell in a 5-6 minute animation. The challenge was in which part of the story to tell and what to leave out. Most of the stories you read about the fires at Yellowstone are told from the perspective of human loss. You always see fire fighters, burned out cars and structures. You hear about the political and public pressure brought to bear on the National Park to fight this fire and you see the stats and numbers. What we hoped to do was show only the story of the event as it happened and the animals caught up in that event. How they moved out of the path of the fire, where they hid and how they struggled against the snow and starvation. It is a story that perfectly lends itself to animation.

BETSY: Getting enough time to work in a concentrated way without interruption and the constant nag of having to earn money. In that strange way, that only fate can bring about, the pandemic and lockdown presented us with the time to focus completely on finishing the film – which we did.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

JERRY: I found it a very emotional experience. For us this story is very close to our hearts. We’ve experienced these fires up close and live with the threat of wild fires and droughts each year. Its sad and beautiful at the same time when you realize that there are a lot of people from different backgrounds and with different experiences understanding and connecting with the beauty of our world and the challenges we are facing. The feedback went far beyond them responding to the images, it was very clear that the animation evoked a much larger emotion. It was never our intention to tell people what to feel and think but what we hoped for is a moment of reflection and a space for contemplation.

BETSY: It was incredibly moving to see and hear the straight from the heart emotion that these eloquent people were unafraid to express. I loved the diversity of the reviewers. You can see they aren’t professional industry critics and they are so far from being jaded. Brava! It was so touching to see something you’ve created and feel strongly about resonate so palpably with others. I loved and am thankful for that!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

JERRY: I personally realized I wanted to make films when I studied graphics design. I found that I couldn’t tell a story the way I wanted with a single image. I decided to stop graphic design and started studying animation. I’ve made independent animations ever since. Betsy and I met 25 years ago. She’s an exceptional writer and designer and worked on many large-scale projects before we met. We started Little Fluffy Clouds so we could earn a living and keep creating our own independent projects. It’s a great collaboration the way we feel really came together on this project with Betsy writing the poem, me doing the animation and together working on the overall design.

BETSY: I can’t pinpoint an exact moment I don’t think there is one. My life is art and filmmaking is one part of that continuing stream of life.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

JERRY: Well we do watch “The Snowman” based on the picture book by Raymond Briggs and “Wind in the Willows” by Dave Unwin every Christmas and now we’ve added “Klaus” and “Wolf Walkers” to the list of our holiday tradition. I’ll also keep “Watership Down” the 1978 Martin Rosen version close by.

BETSY: “The Women”, George Cukor 1939 and “His Girl Friday”, Howard Hawk 1940. These films represent Hollywood at the peak of creativity. In animation nothing beats, “Wind in the Willows”, Dave Unwin 1995, “Ghost in the Shell”, Mamoru Oshii 1995 and “Spirited Away”, Hayao Miyazaki 2001. There is always something new to see in every viewing of each of these films.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

JERRY: I’ll let Betsy answer that.

BETSY: Film Freeway is an excellent service, especially for small indie filmmakers who don’t have a PR machine backing them. FF organizes everything in one place and takes the chore out of film submissions. I recommend it.

9. What is your favorite meal?

JERRY: One that’s comes with good conversation.

BETSY: Sushi. Philosophically though nothing beats a dinner table surrounded by good friends and excellent conversationalists.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

JERRY: As soon as we have recovered from this journey I’m sure we’ll venture on our next that is probably a little longer but again something about nature. Our previous film, “As The River Flows”, was about the return of northern California River Otters to our watershed. We find nature endlessly inspiring.

BETSY: First we have to get “Yellowstone 88” out to as many people as we can before we can turn to a new project. “As the River Flows” our previous film was made in the same genre. I think there will be a third in this series but it may take a year or so before we can begin to realize that project. Also, and in the meantime, we have to work on commercially viable projects to get the money to make the next film. Life of a small indie studio :°)

Interview with Filmmaker/Animator Siena Kuan (LEMONS)

LEMONS played to rave reviews at the August 2021 Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

First I wanted to make a film with my friends. Quarantine was a wake up call to my fast approaching end of my college career. We hadn’t seen each other or been able to feel the power of teamwork and networking while apart, even with zoom and similar technologies. That being said, I was feeling quite inadequate during quarantine, as I had time to self reflect and unfortunately compare myself to my peers and the world around me. Being close to graduating, I felt an unease that I hadn’t reached “perfection” quite yet and this search is very very tiring. And with social media we are bombarded with people and things that appear perfect, but I began to question what perfection really is. What is my perfection? And I still don’t have an answer. In short I wanted to create a film that reminded, not only me, but everyone that perfection is not what everyone else has, but it is for you to decide.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

This project took my team a month. I challenged my team to make a film during our winter break.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Self Kindness

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

I had never directed a film before. I made it up as I went: recruiting, pitching, creating an animation pipeline, compositing, etc…

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was relieved that the message I wanted to send was received. Also I was so touched by everyone’s kind words that I immediately sent the video to my team, because I wanted to show them what we did. 🙂

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

In college, once I decided to pursue animation. Although when I started I didn’t know I wanted to write and share stories. I didn’t know I could be a leader.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

It might be “Song of The Sea” or “The Spongebob Movie”.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I liked the FilmFreeway process. Everything was clear and straightforward.

9. What is your favorite meal?

My Grandmother’s Steamed Fish.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I hope to enter the animation industry, most likely as a visdev artist. But if I get that chance I would like to enter the writers room one day. In the near future I am planning on creating a children’s book.

Interview with Filmmaker Nils Lane (AGAINST MY WILL)

AGAINST MY WILL played to rave reviews at the August 2021 WILDsound Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

Even though this story is a fiction, it was written from real events experienced or told by those very close to me. My own experience with lockdowns is also infused into the storyline.

It is indeed this common experience lived by many people that inspired me to write a story describing the slow downfall of a person affected by the deprivation of freedom that destroys her psychologically. I also wanted to explore the consequences on her married, family and professional life.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Based on what happened in France in November 2020, the story was written in December 2020, shot in January 2021 and the post-production took place until April 2021 to deliver the movie in the heat of the moment as the subject is very contemporary.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Unexpected – Puzzling

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

I had very little time to complete the film from the idea to the finish line. Because of this, I had to rush out everything. The script writing, cast completion, rehearsal, shooting and post-production were all done in 4 months and this was very time-consuming and difficult with a few hours of sleep everyday.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

They nailed it! Some reactions were incredibly on point with my vision of the movie and what I wanted the audience to feel and understand about the story. This was very satisfying to hear it. It would be great to have a second part with the most negative (but realistic) reactions too.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I began to shot with a “family” camera at ten years old but I really realized that I wanted to make films at sixteen years old. Unfortunately, I devoted myself to my engineering studies and my professional career and only came back in 2020 in the cinematographic universe.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Without hesitation, The Matrix. As a teenager, I must have seen it in loop more than a hundred times! It really blew my mind and it shaped my vision on so many things.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I found it the best way to submit a film to festivals. It’s better than any other platform currently in the market.

9. What is your favorite meal?

New Orleans Gumbo!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

The restrictions due to the pandemic are constantly slowing me down but if it gets better, I’ll begin shooting my next project which is a thriller/Sci-Fi mini series intended for distribution on Youtube.

Interview with Filmmaker Davide Petrosino (A COUPLE)

A COUPLE played to rave reviews at the August 2021 STUDENT Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

This story didn’t come from an idea of mine. It was written for another director’s degree film (National Cinema School). This director was expelled from the school so they called a former student to take the project home… and they chose me! But, when I read the story for the first time I immediately connected to the main theme and the main feeling of the story and I thought: “This could be my story”. So it was pretty easy for me to work on this project as my project because I knew what and how I wanted to show. That’s the key: even if the plot is very specific, the story is the story of all of us. Because we all loved someone that way, we all know what a break up means. And that’s the reason why we tell stories: for reaching people’s hearts with real feelings.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

When I started working on this project, the story was already written but it needed several changes. By the way, from my first day at work, it took three months more or less.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Intimate, delicate.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Time, no doubt. We had 3 weeks to edit the script, do castings, build scenery and so on… The production gave us 5 days of shooting so we couldn’t make mistakes. I did only one week of rehearsals but I was lucky enough to have two great actors and a wonderful crew.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It was touching. I make movies to reach people and to communicate with ’em. So, It’s always great when I see that something I made reaches the audience and gives ’em some emotions. It’s something that makes me think “What you do has meaning”.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I was a teenager and I attended the Giffoni Film Festival’s jury. I watched great movies and, after the screenings, I met the directors. I was listening to them talking about their job and it was wonderful, so I thought “That’s what I want to do for a living”.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

It’s hard to say. I grew up with the Star Wars saga but there’s a movie I need to watch at least one time a year: Nuovo Cinema Paradiso by Giuseppe Tornatore.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s so important. Not everybody is so lucky to have a distributor for his/her film. A platform like FilmFreeway allows you to be the distributor of yourself in a very professional way. It’s great!

9. What is your favorite meal?

I’m Italian so I could talk about food for hours ahahah. Well, my answer is: spaghetti with clams (cooked by my dad).

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m workin’ on a documentary about a great Italian photojournalist. I hope I’ll be able to realize it soon. Meanwhile I’m writing my first feature film, the story about a musician and a mysterious sound. I’m looking for a producer. It’s hard but this is the life I chose and I would never come back.

Interview with Filmmaker Sonia Gemmiti (OUTSIDE MY WINDOW)

OUTSIDE MY WINDOW played to rave reviews at the August 2021 DANCE Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

It comes from my own personal experience with agoraphobia. It is an expression of the struggle I often go through with leaving my home. I wanted to depict the mental tug-and-pull, the stages of negotiation, the coping mechanisms—all that’s entailed.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I submitted the film’s script to the Equity Showcase Cayle Chernin Awards back in March of 2019. I was awarded the media production prize that May—this came with a cash prize and in-kind services, but the best part was a mentorship through CSARN, which paired me up with Guy Maddin. I shot the film in two parts, the first in November of 2019 and the second in February of 2020. Post-production was completed the day before we all went into lock down in mid-March 2020.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Trauma, healing

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle was putting such a huge piece of myself into the film. It’s a vulnerable feeling to ask people to watch it. This is a side of me I have instinctually kept hidden from not just the public, but from people who know me well. And to top it off, after making the piece, you have to promote it!

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I found the feedback so valuable and overwhelming. Because of the timing of when I finished the film, I missed out on the audience experience. Due to Covid, we couldn’t even have a crew screening. The thoughtful feedback I received certainly added fuel to my creative spirit.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

Honestly, becoming a director never, ever felt like a possibility. I knew I wanted to work in film—and I did, as a set designer—but I was almost embarrassed to say out loud that I wanted to direct. It’s taken some growing on my part to develop that confidence, a sense of self, and decide that the stories I wanted to tell felt urgent and in need of telling. With directing, I found a freedom of expression that I haven’t had in any other artform.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

An American in Paris

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I like that it’s organized, centralized and easy to follow your submissions.

9. What is your favorite meal?

My grandmother’s pasta.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I was recently awarded a grant for the Canada Council for the Arts to develop a short film about my Italian grandparents. It will be a hybrid documentary/fantasy using live-action actors and animation.

Interview with Filmmaker Amy E. Powell (BARE NAKED TRUTHS)

BARE NAKED TRUTHS played to rave reviews at the August 2021 Under 5 Minute Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

I was looking to produce a short film that would be realistic to produce for a new filmmaker with no money. Creator of the series, Ellen DeSitter, brought me her idea to film a “vignette-style” series of monologues about the struggles nude models go through while posing for drawing classes. I loved the idea and immediately realized all the ways it could be an exciting challenge–for example, filming actors who can’t move–while also being an idea that could generate a lot of content on a no-budget.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

We filmed 10 episodes of the series in 2 days in March 0f 2019. It took us a while to find support on the post-production side of things, but luckily found our incredible editor Ana Christian and amazing sound designer, Cait Rappel, and they were able to work from home during the pandemic to get our first three episodes finished in April 2020.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Delightfully Free-Spirited

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

On the production side of things, it was really just myself and Ellen figuring it all out, which was tough. Organizing a 10 episode web series production, while also being the director, actor, and writers requires a lot of attention to detail and organization. But we were supported excellently by our DP, J.J. Littlefield, the actors and the artists, and the rest of the crew, so once we got to set, things fell right into place.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Flattered! And as a director, relieved to hear that at least a few people picked up on the intentions and nuances I was trying to weave into the film!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I went to school to be an actor, but I think I always had the desire to make films more than I had the desire to star in them. I didn’t really know that women could make movies until I grew up and fully realized that I could do whatever I wanted, even if it didn’t look like there was room for me.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably the Fellowship of the Ring.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is a breeze. It’s such a relief to have all the festival information and submission details in one place so you don’t have to keep track of it all yourself.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Dessert.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

As for Bare Naked Truths, we are using our first season to grow our audience so we can get season 2 off the ground! Season 2 is going to be a more traditional episodic that gets more in depth about the characters, their struggles, and their relationships with each other. I am also currently writing my first feature film, a later in life coming of age story about a woman’s struggle with making bad decisions.

Interview with Filmmaker Naama Lahav (CHERRY)

CHERRY was the winner of BEST SHORT FILM at the August 2021 FEMALE Filmmakers Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

. I had a good story to tell, based on a personal experience, and I wasn’t permitted to make the film as a project in my school studies. This drove us to make it completely independently.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The idea popped into my head a month after the abortion (2 years ago), but from the first draft to the complete product it took us a year.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Nervous breakdown

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

We lost half a day of shooting, it felt catastrophic.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Thrilling and touching. This is what you make films for.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

When I was Twelve.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Mean Girls.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s wonderful, super-easy and convenient. Highly addictive.

9. What is your favorite meal?

Tomato Spaghetti.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Final-year project at film school. Next year.

Interview with Actor/Writer/Producer Sara Sue Vallee (SOUR PATCH)

SOUR PATCH was the winner of BEST PERFORMANCES at the August 2021 FEMALE Film Festival.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

As the writer, producer and actress in this film, I was motivated to make a film about the clash of a long term friendship, because it is something I personally experienced and believe everyone can relate to. It’s something very difficult to go through and accept, and rarely portrayed on screen.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took about 6 months, to write, re-write, explore the characters, rehearse with the director and then shoot. The post-production took about a year because we had a lot of different artists working on it and they had different schedules.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

People Change. Acceptance. (I know it’s three!) 😉

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The team was wonderful, so I can’t find anything! Can I say: Poster Design. I ended up doing it using photoshop and it was so difficult. I will definitely find someone with those skills to do it for my next film.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I LOVED IT! It’s the first time I get to hear the feedbacks from people in this industry. It made me feel really happy to hear about how the film affected and was interpreted by the viewers, and it added purpose to my work as a filmmaker and motivated me to keep making films.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. When did you realize that you wanted to make films?

I began acting at around 11 and its only 4 years ago that I started exploring writing and filmmaking. It seemed so intimidating coming from an actor background, but I’m learning so much every time and that’s the biggest reward; to carry a project from the beginning to the end. It’s all about team work!

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I would say Mathilda as a kid, and Requiem for a Dream as an Adult…ohhh and perhaps The Notebook when I need an injection of romanticism in my life ahaha

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I was targeting Female oriented festivals based in Canada and the Toronto Feedback Female Film Festival seemed like a great festival embracing all my targeting points and offering great follow up that you rarely get from other festivals.

9. What is your favorite meal?

I am the weirdest but if I could eat just one meal it would be Salad. I make the best ones and I never get tired of them. But I’m also a bad cook so I’m sure that’s the only thing I know how to make properly too. Otherwise; sushi with some fresh salmon or grilled eel

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I keep pursuing my acting career, but I will also be entering Film production school at Concordia this September. I am also in the pre-production of another short film titled Firecracker that I’m co-creating, co-producing and acting in it, that will be shot in September.