Interview with Filmmaker David Rawlings (SLASHED!)

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

David Rawlings: I’m a huge fan of 80s horror. The cheesier, the better. I grew up on Freddy Kruger and Jason Voorhees, and always wanted to take a unique stab at that genre.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The general pre-production and production took about 6 months. Post Production was initially another 3. However, I wanted to really make sure the audio was as correct as possible. It took longer than I was expecting, so the finished product probably took one whole year to complete.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Retro Arthritis

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The weather. We only had 2 full days to shoot everything and we got rained out for one half of those days. Considering 90% of the shoot was exterior shots, it certainly created a headache to the entire crew and cast. Not to mention that the public park – we were shooting in – closed their public bathrooms at 2 o’clock in the afternoon.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Really pleased. I was glad to see that audience members really enjoyed it and understood the direction. My favourite moments are when we flashback to the “80s” and it was great to see the audience to get a kick out of that. Thank you for all your kind words.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Being a fan of films such as A Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th, I wanted to create my own serial slasher killer… but wanted to have fun with it. Taking the idea of an ax-murderer who has aged and not at the level that he used to be, gave me some great ideas for dialogue and scenes. I’m also a fan of the likes of Monty Python and wanted to inject some of that goofy humour and ridiculousness as well.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

It’s probably a tie between The Goonies and Jurassic Park.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s really rather simple. Once the film project has been uploaded, being able to simply and efficiently submit your film to a wealth of different festivals certainly makes things less stressful.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Bon Jovi – Livin on a Prayer

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m currently working in the UK as a video editor. I’ve got many ideas and scripts for other shorts, and I hope to be back into pre-production very soon.

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Interview with Filmmaker Justin Zachary (NOW)

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Justin Zachary: Necessity. These days as an actor if you’re not creating your own work then it feels like you’re behind in the game. I also love making movies.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

About 20 years ago I was doing theatre in Bakersfield, CA. A playwright by the name of Roger Mathey wrote a one act play called NOW. It was just two people in a room talking about memories of their relationship and the crazy twist in the end when you find out that she’s a robot. I loved the story but unfortunately the play was never produced. Cut to, 2011 when I was looking for a project to direct and remembered this story. I called my friend Roger and asked if he still had the script. He didn’t. So, I asked him with his permission could I re-tell the story with my own vision? He agreed and that’s when the initial screenplay began.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Daddy issues.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

I’d have to say the VFX. It was definitely the most costly and time consuming. We went through 3 different artists until I finally landed on one I loved. Lincoln Smith. A God sent.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Nervous. It’s always nerve-wracking hearing what people think of your work. Especially something that’s so personal to you. But, after I heard the positive feedback it was a relief that people actually got it!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I took my friend Roger’s original idea of two people sitting in a room talking about memories and the twist in the end then added some personal elements to give it a sense of myself. For example; The Father character is based on my ex Father-in Law. I always felt that I needed to impress him. Maybe it was my own insecurities but, I never felt that I was good enough. My character’s obsession with fixing things is another good example. I always feel that most problems (especially in relationships) can be fixed with a conversation. If you put the right words in a specific order anything can be solved. It’s an idealistic way of thinking that always gets proved wrong.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably, Caddyshack.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s great! Simple and easy to submit.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

“Every Breath You Take” by The Police


10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m in the process of writing a few different things. An epic sci-fi post alien invasion film, and a supernatural western.

Interview with Filmmaker Barbara van Rijn (THE CURE)

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Barbara van Rijn: As a daughter of a Pharmacist I am brought up with the belief that herbal and traditional medicine is not to be trusted. After living in Ghana for a while, I realized that people in Ghana look at this very differently. I wanted to know more, the reasoning of people using herbal medicine vs orthodox medicine and how this affects their life.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I was planning to only film a short TV item, finishing in 2 weeks. I ended up taking 5 years to finish.


3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Emotional and impressive

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

It was difficult to find the right balance in making this a story about ‘the people using traditional medicine’ and all facts and figures that are known about this topic. I could have gone on an on doing more research, more filming and make it more of an investigative documentary. However it was always meant as a small story about people using traditional medicine. So sometimes it was hard to hold on to that initial goal but still find the right balance of giving information to satisfy the viewer.


5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I often agreed with them and their feelings after seeing the film. It was great to have people giving feedback on the film, it gave me a lot of positive energy!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I was working at a local TV station in Ghana as an advisor where the doctor of ‘The Cure’ was advertising this drug live on air. That stirred a discussion between me and my Ghanaian boss by then, he believed the drug was a real cure, and I was very doubtful. Once I started following the doctor and his patients it became such an emotional journey that wouldn’t let me go.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Documentary: Google baby

Film: Blackbook (Dutch film)

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It makes it very easy to apply and gives a good overview of the possibilities. Perfect.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Meadowlands – The African Mama’s

No one – Alicia keys


10. What is next for you? A new film?

Hopefully yes. I have a topic in mind, also coming from West Africa. I started the research. First I have to make a firm decision to really continue documentary making and make the switch from fulltime corporate film maker to making documentaries. This festival actually gave me some confidence boost to focus more on documentaries.

Interview with Filmmaker Jeremy Abrams (FIGHTING CHILDHOOD CANCER)

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Jeremy Abram: The Vanderslice family were friends of my wife, and when I saw a social media post that included a photo of Louie looking out of the window from his hospital room at Children’s Hospital of the Kings Daughters in Norfolk, Virginia at a crowd of people who gathered for a candle light vigil with a poster that said “Hope”, it peaked my interest to start following his story, and I fell in love with the family and their love for their son.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Their father (Joshua) reached out to me and told me the Roc Solid foundation was going to be constructing a playground in their back yard in honor of Louie and to bring joy to their family. He had seen some of my video work and asked if I would ever consider documenting this event for them. Not only did I agree and feel privileged that he even asked – I assembled a team of videographers/photographers to volunteer their time to help cover the event. We started filming at 6:30am until 3pm, and it required around 70 hours of filming, photographing, archiving and editing.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Always hope

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Having to take breaks in editing to gather my emotions.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was bracing for impact on technical critiques, only to be relieved that everyone absorbed the overall story and that it resonated with an authentic human experience.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea was there, the challenge was to strip it down to the bare bones to make it a potent story without unecessary clutter.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Braveheart

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I have submitted previous films to various platforms – but FilmFreeway was the simplest that actually delivered valuable critique and feedback. It was well organized and proactive.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Woman with the tatooed hands, Atmosphere

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I currently work full time in IT, and do freelance video production projects for pleasure as they arise.