Interview with Filmmaker Jeffrey John Eyamie (S0, WHAT DO YOU THINK?)

S0, WHAT DO YOU THINK? played to rave reviews at the August 2020 COMEDY Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Jeffrey John Eyamie: I wrote this piece as a fun, slice-of-life kind of pop song … something short and sweet and universal. When it came time to direct it, the film became a love letter to my wife, whose artwork is featured in the film. Karen Tusa also motivated me to make this film when she said, “hey Jeff, I want to make this script you wrote and I want you to direct it!”

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

We had a draft of this script sitting in a drawer for about three years. From the time Karen pulled it out of the drawer to production was about two months. We shot it in one day. Post-production took about four months. A lot of work from a lot of people for a four-minute piece of sugar pie!

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Cleverly.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Thankfully, we had just completed things when COVID hit. So the biggest obstacle is really getting the film in front of people! If a film screens in front of no one, does it exist? We are very thankful for WildSOUND and everyone involved with this festival, where our film made its world premiere.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Honestly, it is very humbling to hear kind words about something you created. I am very proud to have been part of the team that forged this piece and helped me execute a vision. The whole point of living is to connect. When you hear someone say you have successfully made something they felt connected to, it couldn’t be more satisfying. It makes me want to make more stuff!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

It came straight out of my id. Who hasn’t done that dance, where you want to be supportive but you know your mouth is going to get you in trouble? Oh, it’s just me? Shit.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

After going through four months of post-production on this film, it would be this film. However, I have seen the Planet of the Apes sequels from the 60s an obscene number of times. Apocalypse Now. A Clockwork Orange. Clearly I didn’t get past the A section of Blockbuster.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

What an amazing service. FilmFreeway takes care of so much legwork for filmmakers and connects the filmmaker to the world. Couldn’t be happier with FilmFreeway.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Well, The King of Wishful Thinking by Mr. Mister and I Think We’re Alone Now by Tiffany were played daily on the musak at the restaurant where I worked as a teen … Spotify tells me my most listened-to artists are Underworld, Kendrick Lamar, Tool and Mastodon.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Watch for my next novel, Still Me, coming out this fall across Canada with Turnstone Press! It takes place entirely on golf courses. Filmwise I am working on a horror comedy about killer dad jokes, in collaboration with my teenage daughter. More info about me? http://www.eyamie.com

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Interview with Filmmaker/Musician Wendy Lenhart (6 FEET CLOSER TO YOU)

6 FEET CLOSER TO YOU was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the August 2020 Comedy Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Wendy Lenhart: Our bass player, Ryan, had the idea for the song and wrote it. Once he shared it with all of us, we knew we needed to record it and turn it into a music video because this is a song that people would really relate to.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Ryan wrote the song over a few days. It took us a couple of weeks to figure out how to record it together remotely. During that time we were talking about the video, but to actually make the video we recorded it all in a 40 minute Zoom call. We did two takes and the call literally ended the second we finished our last take. The timing was amazing.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Quarantine Love

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Probably recording the music. We all had a lot of technical difficulties. I ended up having to sing the song entirely in my closet to block out all of the ambient noises. I live on a busy street in South Philadelphia and when something like a garbage truck goes by, you know it!

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Oh I was so nervous! I didn’t want to watch- I already don’t like watching myself on screen! But all the feedback was so great and so positive that I’ve shared it a lot since the initial show. And people’s reactions were exactly what we were going for and that’s really satisfying- especially right now.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

We had a lot of different ideas for what the video would look like. Performing in PPE. Shooting a more literal version of the song. Stitch together a lot of people dancing. I think all of those ideas were great, but at the end of the day we felt that the video had to be relatable the way the song was relatable. And what’s more relatable than a Zoom call right now?

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Oh that’s a good question. I’m not sure, I want to say it probably has Muppets in it. Maybe Muppets Take Manhattan?

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It was very easy. It’s a great set-up. We may be a little atypical as far as users go because we are submitting sketch comedy music videos.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

It would definitely be a song by the Beatles. I listened to the White Album a lot during Junior High, but I think I’ve lapped it now with the megasong on the second side of Abbey Road.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Right now we’re trying to figure out the logistics for doing a virtual concert in the next few months. We just started practicing outdoors in person, but I need to buy a canopy for my backyard in case it rains. We’re also working on recording some more songs and maybe putting together our second album.

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Interview with Filmmaker Victor McGowan (POGONOPHOBIA)

POGONOPHOBIA was awarded BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the August 2020 COMEDY Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Victor McGowan: After meeting the writer at a funeral (of all places) I was immediately taken by his elevator pitch for his script; “A young man who is afraid of beards”. That’s all it took to pique my interest and once I read it, I knew it was a winner.

Also, having Tom Ryan come on board as director was such a privilege for me as I am a fan of his work and was eager to find a project for the two of us. His vision and leadership on set was instrumental to the film being what it is.
Victor McGowan

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Nearly two years!

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Quirky, sweet

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The stars aligned for us during the production so the only obstacle was the usual issues you have with low budget films e.g finite shooting schedule, long hours etc.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was very taken by everyone’s connection to it. We hoped that it would stand out amongst other shorts shown at festivals and that was evident in the reaction video!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

It was the brainchild of the writer, Damian Ryan who is an up and coming star.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably Pulp Fiction, I know the film by heart.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I love it! Their filters are very efficient and it’s reassuring that you’re not submitting to a scam!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I think, ‘Without Me’ by Eminem.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have another short, ‘Stacey’s Place’ that’s currently doing the festival route. I am also in development with another producer, Dominic Wright of Ripple World Pictures, for a political satire set in Ireland during the Cold War!

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Interview with Filmmaker Katrina Cebreiro (FEDERAL APPROVED PARENT)

FEDERAL APPROVED PARENT was awarded BEST FILM at the August 2020 COMEDY Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Katrina Cebreiro: The time that we live in motivated me to make the film. It’s crazy times! Also the idea of who is really qualified to become a parent? It’s kind of weird to think that anyone, legally can become a parent if they wish, yet the government screens us if we want to buy a gun or we are interviewed if we want a job. But there are no qualifications to become a parent! Even if the government was to regulate on that aspect it would feel a bit too much like a tyranny.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I had this idea for awhile. I really wanted to shoot something, but we were in quarantine. So I looked through all my old ideas and picked the one that was easiest and safest to shoot quarantine style. It took 6 hours to shoot and about a week or two in post production.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Approved parenthood.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

When editing, it’s hard to decide what take to use when it comes to comedic storytelling. Initially it seems funny, but after hearing it over and over again, you start to question if it’s actually funny. So I’d go back and forth, replacing takes.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Scared! And then relieved because they had a lot of great comments!

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I was having trouble getting pregnant and when I finally did four years later, I lost the baby. So I felt it unfair that it’s so easy for other people to have babies, but not myself. And then I thought if I am even qualified? What if we all had to be approved by the government for parenthood. Who would actually make the cut?

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Thirteen and It’s a Beautiful Life!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Really easy to use!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Let it Be by the Beatles.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes. My first feature film!

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Interview with Filmmaker Julia Fullerton-Batten (1814 FROST FAIR)

1814 FROST FAIR played to rave reviews at the July 2020 FEMALE Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?
How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Julia Fullerton-Batten: I am a fine art photographer shooting story-telling projects on a wide variety of themes. As part of a major project narrating the history, traditions and customs along the Thames River (‘Old Father Thames’) I decided to recreate the 1814 Frost Fair on the Thames in London. This was an occasion when the river froze over completely and Londoners used the opportunity to celebrate on the ice. Over the years, there had been a number of Frost Fairs in the shadow of the Old London Bridge. What was not known at the time was that the 1814 Frost Fair would be the last after a new bridge was built to replace the old structure. Historically, therefore this fair is of particular significance to The River Thames’ and London history. Although brief it was reported as being celebrated exuberantly even to the extent that an elephant was led across the frozen ice.

I was excited with the thought of the project and felt a curious urge to experience the fair for myself. I always endeavour to make the settings, costumes, props, etc for my photoshoots as authentic as possible and always do a lot of research beforehand. The work for this was on an even larger scale than usual. The 1814 Frost Fair occurred prior to the invention of photography so I had to rely on paintings, sketches and newspaper reports.

The cast increased to over forty and included circus performers. I had to research for entertainment tents, costumes and props relevant to the time. Sets were constructed in a large studio in London. Attention to detail was absolutely paramount for me.

I was halfway through planning this already massive, complex stills production when I realised that I just had to film it as well. It was truly the only way to give an audience a real-life experience of the electric atmosphere of what the 1814 Frost Fair must have been like. I embarked on this filming venture with no prior experience of having directed a film of any kind.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took me quite a few months to plan the entire project, both stills and film. There was a lot of additional planning needed for the film. I shot everything in a large drive-in studio and required a day for setting up and preparing the lighting, a second day for shooting the stills and a third for the filming.

On the shoot and filming days over ninety people were involved – actors, circus performers, crew, etc. On our last day we were obliged to clear the studio of all props and lighting. We started very early and didn’t finish until after midnight – all in all it was a super long day of hard but rewarding work.

A fiddle player provides the background music, the tone of the music changes from more or less serious to playful depending on the scene. Everything had to be coordinated to make sense. Although there is a minimum of dialogue there are many different characters involved in shouting, exclaiming, exertions of arm wrestling, selling, gambling, etc. I introduced interactions at all levels – to the different circus performers (sword swallower, fire breather, contortionist, stilt walker, etc.), street events (stealing, prostitution, gambling, etc). I really wanted to bring the Frost Fair atmosphere alive, illustrating also the differences pervading at that time between the wealthy and the poor, beggars and street urchins.

3. How would you describe your short film!?

Fantastical.
Sensational.
Step in time incapsulation
Fun period piece

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Never directed a short film of any kind before it was a huge learning curve from beginning to end. I am used to working with large crews but not one of nearly 100 people. However, the biggest concerns were the significant financial implications and having enough time on the day itself. I wished that I had at least two days for filming, it would have been less stressful. However, considering all those factors I’m delighted with the end result that I achieved and the resonance that the film has received worldwide since.

I was lucky to have an amazing DOP who brought a super talented crew onboard with him, as well as the support of Big Buoy in London and Eight VFX in LA for the post-production. These factors helped make a huge difference to the final result.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

The feedback was incredible. The commentators found the settings and costumes to be convincingly authentic. Those comments made my long hours of research and months of searching and hiring activities worthwhile. In all, it seemed as though my efforts to create a vibrant, joyful atmosphere had succeeded.

There were comments that it would be a great setting for a feature film and I was flattered to be compared with the structure and composition of my film with the style of Tim Burton, a director whom I have long admired! There was also a comparison with the film ‘Orlando’, based on a novel by Virginia Woolf, directed by Sally Potter and starring Tilda Swinton and Quentin Crip, in which scenes were also set on ice. Another film that I have enjoyed for its settings and lighting.

I was surprised to learn that all admitted to not knowing about the Frost Fairs on the River Thames and that I was able to make them aware of an exciting part of London history and that even an elephant once paraded the ice from bank to bank.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

In the Mood for Love, by the Hong Kong Chinese film director Kar-Wai Wong

This is such a simple story, filmed beautifully. Each frame is atmospheric, mostly filmed at night. I get inspiration from films and especially this one. I could spend hours studying each scene, frame by frame, to enjoy the impeccable lighting.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I found it great. With one upload of the film it is super easy process to read about the festivals in one place and decide to submit to those most relevant and appealing to the film and the target audience. I was able to do it when travelling and it only takes a few seconds.

The 1814 Frost Fair film already gained many awards internationally. It is so exciting for me to read the messages when they appear in my inbox!

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Hallelujah by Rufus Wainwright. What a classic, beautiful rendition of this wonderful song!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I am hooked! I would love to direct more and already have some ideas. Following on to my contact with one of the cast of the 1814 Frost Fair I will soon be shooting a project on young female contortionists and am thinking how I can again combine moving imagery with stills.

It has suddenly become an exciting new world for me. One that I’m going to enjoy exploring!

Interview with Filmmaker Imelda O’Reilly (TUMBLING TOWARDS HOME)

TUMBLING TOWARDS HOME was the winner of BEST DOC CHARACTERS at the July 2020 DOCUMENTARY Short Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Imelda O’Reilly: I have a dear friend Malcolm Adams who is an Irish actor and we wanted to create a project together. I wasn’t sure what film we would make, and I didn’t have a huge budget. The process began by interviewing him but eventually a story within the story began to unfold as we chatted about his decision to move to New York in 1989 to pursue his dream of becoming an actor.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you
to make this short?

The whole process probably took a year and a half as I decided to work with an animator Damarrius Thompson to fill in Malcolm’s backstory in New York in 1989. The animator was working on many different jobs and so it took a while to create this aesthetic element within the film.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Escaping dreams!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

I would say lack of funding. You need three things to make a film, time, money and imagination. Often you don’t have all three of these elements so in the process the lack of funding can delay finishing the film. Often you spend more on postproduction than on production so each stage in the filmmaking process can be costly. We also shot in Ireland and New York so that delayed the process of filming during the production stage.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking
about your film in the feedback video?

I absolutely love that WildSOUND takes the time to film the audience’s responses to the film. WilldSound FEEDBACK is the only festival who takes the time to visually record the audience feedback and then provide it to the filmmakers.

This is a very personal story for Malcolm Adams and not an easy one to tell so having the opportunity especially during a global pandemic to hear responses to the film is amazing. It gives you the impetus to keep going, telling impactful stories and making films.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I myself am an Irish immigrant and I wanted to explore the relationship one has to leaving and returning home. In Ireland when Malcolm immigrated a lot of Irish people immigrated because there was a lack of employment for the younger generation.

As Malcolm Adams mentions he leaves home because he felt he couldn’t pursue acting in Ireland at that time because it wasn’t a place, he felt he could experiment without failing.

He had to leave in order to embrace failing in the pursuit of his dreams. The reasons one leaves a homeland are complex, a part of me wanted to explore this contradiction.

Every time you make a choice in life you lose something, and you gain something it was the contradiction of these two opposing forces that drew me to exploring this subject matter. That combined with chasing the ghosts of one’s past is always compelling to me to explore as a filmmaker.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

My choices in film changes and I return to films for different reasons. Most recently I watched a German film titled Toni Erdman. It was about a relationship between a father and his daughter.

I’m attracted to films with interesting characters. At first this film moved slow for me but after inhabiting the lives of the characters, I kept mulling them over in my head. That is a true sign the film resonates on a deeper level.

The director was female Maren Ade. In terms of a film I’ve returned to most in my life, there is more than one. I like Sprit of the Beehive, Taxi Driver, Metropolis, Naked, The Mirror, Post Tenebras Lux because those films capture a cinema of loneliness and isolation.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings
of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I like Film Freeway, it is an excellent platform to submit your film as you post everything on the site and it makes the work of submitting your film much easier.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I have one album that I love listening to in the morning, and it’s Something Else by Cannonball Adderley. Often music reminds me of certain times in my life, and playing those songs takes me back in time.

I had three albums that I listened to while living on 8th street and Avenue B in the East Village in the late nineties. The albums were, Cat Power, The covers record, Nirvana Unplugged and Cannonball Adderley. It was a very creative time in my life, so it reminds me of all the amazing memories I had when I lived downtown in NYC. I also loved listening to The Jam, Style Council and The Cure at a different time in life.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have a feature film titled We’re the Kids in America that the screenplay was an official selection for L’Atélier Cinéfondation Cannes International Film Festival in 2018. I have a US and an Irish co-producer and hopefully we will have the opportunity to shoot it at some point in the future. In addition, I am working on a short narrative film titled Love at White Rabbit.

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Interview with Filmmaker Cate Celso (KING OF THE ROAD)

KING OF THE ROAD played to rave reviews at the July 2020 DOCUMENTARY Short Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Cate Celso: After seeing Rick perform I was impressed by his energy and how he lit up his audiences. Getting to know him and all his layers I found his personal journey inspiring and wanted to share that with others.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It was about 9 months from start to finish. Seven in pre and production, two in post.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

heartfelt journey

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

We definitely wanted to capture as much of Rick’s performances as we could so I would say sorting through 24 hours of footage/interviews to tell Rick’s story in 25 minutes was definitely a challenge to completing the film.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Smiles and gratitude. The fact that film lovers took the time to watch and comment on King of the Road was humbling. Very pleased that the film inspired the same sentiment I felt watching Rick and making the film.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I’ve always been interested in hearing people’s stories. After meeting Rick and being inspired by his resilience, his ability to juggle a day job and a passion career while overcoming such personal obstacles… living your passion as a creative while having to be in a day job that may not be creative. The balance, the strength, the focus, the inspiration to just move on through and do it – share your unique talent, your gifts- I wanted to share that inspiration with others.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

As a filmmaker I am always watching films over and over again- one of my favorites is After the Wedding directed by Susanne Bier.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I find the platform easy to use as a filmmaker. You are one step removed from the festivals itself but for convenience sake it’s easy to follow and submit.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Too many to tally which one I’ve listened to the most- currently consistently listening to Eminence Front by The Who.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes! We are currently in a modified production schedule of A Bold Journey, my next short documentary film. Hoping to be ready by summer 2021 for the festival circuit. Following the journey of Tom Bold, a 77 year old hiker, maverick and adventurer from Sonoma, CA.

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Interview with Filmmaker Takeshi Yashiro (GON, THE LITTLE FOX)

GON, THE LITTLE FOX was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the June 2020 ANIMATION Feedback Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Takeshi Yashiro: I love the original story written by Niimi Nankichi but when I was a kid, I couldn’t realize how good it was.

Since the original story is a classical children’s literature, I thought most people hadn’t been able to realize the true goodness or beauty of the story like me. So I wanted to make this short film so that audiences can discover how good and beautiful the story is.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took about 2 years to complete.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Treasured Book (I am delighted if this film would be like a treasured book of the audience.)

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

To balance the artistic aspect and the entertainment side. I wanted to include the artistic aspect that can be objectively enjoyed and also the entertainment side that makes audiences to immerse themselves in the story as well.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was glad that the audience had paid close attention to the details and felt what I wanted to express.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Many ideas were coming out and piling up little by little. The most brilliant ideas were popped up in my mind right after I woke up so I tried to sleep a lot.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

“Take Me Out To the Snowland”

This is a popular movie which represents a certain times in Japan. I watched it when I was in high school and I remembered I felt jealousy for how incredibly the movie excited the audience.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0264171/

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s so helpful to submit a movie to many fabulous film festivals easily.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?
I can’t think of anything.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I haven’t decided anything for the next one but it would be a short film. I am always thinking to challenge a feature film someday though.

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Interview with Filmmaker Piotr Sulkowski (PLAY)

PLAY was the winner of BEST SOUND & MUSIC at the July 2020 DRAMA Feedback Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Piotr Sulkowski: I would like to connect with my subconsciousness

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

About two years I suppose

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Mental Rollercoaster

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Camera movements. The master shots I came up with were difficult to achieve.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Sometimes people don’t understand, but this film is for me like an experimental poem. The most important in this project was to be honest with myself. Feelings even if You touch mystery…

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I was waiting for it… writing a lot of notes… allowed myself to be lost and digging deeper and deeper… and after one night It just revealed to me. I saw it in my head almost like in cinema

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

“8 and 1/2” by Federico Fellini

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Like in Tina Turner song “Simply the best”

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

My favourite music group is “Morphine” I also like music from Sorrentino movies… and also old polish stuff like “Kryzys” and “Świetliki”

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes, feature movie is one of my biggest goal… But I dream about writing with somebody with I can share my soul and work