Interview with Filmmaker Alex Sangha (MY NAME WAS JANUARY)

MY NAME WAS JANUARY played to rave reviews at the February 2020 FEMALE Feedback Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Alex Sangha: The social coordinator of the non-profit that I founded for LGBTQ South Asians and their friends was brutally stabbed 18 times in her own home. She was a transgender Filipina woman. She was a much loved member of our organization and we wanted to create a tribute for her to showcase her light, legacy, and love in the minds of people she left behind. We wanted to share her story as we knew her and what she meant to us and to provide a platform for other transgender woman of colour.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Three years. We hired two journalism students from Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Surrey BC Canada. Elina Gress and Lenee Son were both women of colour and this was their first film.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Authentic and real

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

It was difficult to obtain funding at first because this was our first film and we did not have a track record.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Feeling a bit nervous and anxious. I was pleased with the feedback overall. I am confident in the end product. My Name Was January has won 14 international awards, and garnered 59 official selections at film festivals around the world. It also landed three distribution deals through Moving Images Distribution of Vancouver, OUTtv and OUTtvGo in Canada, and Revry of California, which is a queer streaming platform. The reception to the film has been positive overall and it has also sparked critical discussion and debate on various issues such as the sex trade, transgender rights, human rights, and violence.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

We wanted to eulogize and create a memorial or tribute to our dear departed friend, January Marie Lapuz

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I am a big fan of the entire Star Wars series. I feel Star Wars has a theme of good vs. evil and the light being a force for good and defeating darkness. I feel society as a whole deal with this similar battle at an individual and even broader societal level.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I really love Film Freeway but I wish it was cheaper to submit films. Cost can be a barrier to get your films to film festivals.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I am a big fan of I dreamed a dream which is on the Les Miserables soundtrack.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Emergence: Out of the Shadows which is about the coming out journey of gay and lesbian South Asians and the reactions of their parents. For more details check out https://emergencefilm.net/

Interview with Filmmaker Sarah Baptist (STARTING LINEUP)

STARTING LINEUP played to rave reviews at the February 2020 Documentary Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Sarah Baptist: I went to the overflow area of Jurassic Park for Game 1 of the Raptors playoff. I instantly became friends with the two men behind me in line. There was something really unique about the community. Strangers were friends. The next time I went back, I brought a camera and I tried to capture it.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took two months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Basketball community!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The lineup was right beside a highway. The audio really needed to be

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It was great. I just want to keep getting better at the craft of short documentary films and hearing the audience reactions helped me learn what I should do for the next film.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I came up with the idea for the film when I was the Jurassic Park viewing area.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The Wizard of Oz.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is a convenient way to submit films.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Sturgill Simpson – Breakers Roar

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I would love to make another film. I’m really interested in telling stories from people we don’t hear from and who may be misunderstood.

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Interview with Filmmaker Shantel Hansen (HER TURF)

HER TURF played to rave reviews at the February 2020 Documentary Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Shantel Hansen: This started back in 2014 when I conceived of the idea of filming women in male dominated sports. Here in the United States, this wasn’t a topic talked about or filmed that often until recently there are more conversations over all about women in male dominated spaces in sports, professionally, and workplace. When I discovered women in football officiating, I knew that there had to be stories to uncover, document, and share. What I didn’t know was how I was going to do it. As a first time director and producer, it took over four years to make this documentary come alive. There have been a lot of ups and downs. A lot of highs and low moments. Looking back, I can’t express how grateful I am to see it all come together in a way that I could have never imagined in a million years. These three incredible women that I filmed along with an amazing film crew (Annice Canday, Tangela Mitchell and Mary Podesta) took a HUGE chance on me, as a rookie. I knew what I lacked in experience (I didn’t go to film school) I could make up with heart, passion and dedication.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

2014-2019

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Real and Inspiring

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Honeslty, it wasn’t having a limited budget. It was getting access to film these incredible women. And when I did get access it was sometimes limited.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

BLOWN AWAY. The audience feedback is priceless. I love how this documentary has a diverse audience. Anyone can watch it.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I knew that I wanted to film something/someone/topic focusing on subculture(s) that impact the larger culture(s) unknownly. Officials and refeeres do that. They are a subculture that is marginalized in that they are in-between the game, players, coaches and fans. You see them (typically when it’s a call that you don’t like or agree with) but you don’t know who they are, why they are there on the line of scrimmage or why they do it.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I’m a mix bag. Big time. I watch crazy pointless series to serious stuff that is at Sunday and Hot Docs.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

This was an overall a great experience to have FilmFreeway as a portal to submit my documentary and keep track of everything.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I listen to everything!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have several projects in pre-production and one heading into production in the summer of 2020. I’m going to build out the concept of fiming more women in male domianted sports including a bull rider, sky diver, jockey, smoke jumper, and drag car sisters. I’m also working on another series filming women that are attempting to do online dating in their 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s.

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Interview with Filmmaker Eric Rusch (PICTURES OF LEO)

PICTURES OF LEO was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY and BEST PERFORMANCES at the January 2020 LGBT Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Eric Rusch : I had had this idea for a feature length film for many years. I’m not really a filmmaker, so I never thought it would actually get made.

Then in 2017 I studied film acting at the Stockholm University of Dramatic Arts. As a part of the course we were encouraged to make our own short films, just to better understand the whole process of film making. So I dusted off this old idea, started to write the script and worked with preproduction at the same time. It was supposed to be a small and simple project but it kept growing and I had a lot of fun making it.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I started writing in August 2018. We shot the whole film for six days in the end of November. I did all the editing and sound mixing during the holidays. Did some pickups and had a first screening in mid January. The film premiered at Wicked Queer: The Boston LGBT Film Festival on March 31st 2019. At that time I knew nothing about color correction, so the first color corrected version was actually screened in Toronto on January 13th 2020.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Warm, contemplative.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

It had to be a zero budget film. So I really depended on the kindness of strangers, as well as of friends and colleagues. Everyone was so helpful and I’m so grateful for that.

While writing the script I realized I needed someone to play the young Nicholas. So I had to find an 18-year-old, who looked like a young version of myself, who could act and who would be willing to kiss another guy on screen. Without pay. I was so happy when I found Oscar through a casting company. If he hadn’t turned up I would have rewritten those scenes completely.

I wanted to shoot a scene in a hospital. I looked everywhere, and a week before shooting it was the only location I still hadn’t found. Then suddenly the manager of a psychiatric ward called and told me they were temporarily closing one whole floor off to paint the walls. It would be empty for a few weeks. We only needed an afternoon. They let us use it for free!

I was determined to do as much work as I could myself. I wrote the script, played the lead, directed and produced the film. I did the casting, location scouting and planning. I also did the cinematography, editing and sound mixing. I watched hundreds of tutorials on YouTube. Not kidding. I had a lot of fun. I certainly learned that good planning is essential. But I will never make a film this way again.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

This is my first short film so I’m still blown away by the fact that people I don’t even know have seen my film.

I was very happy to see that the film raised some interesting questions, like “who lived the true life and who didn’t” and how Leo’s choices are no less valid given his situation. And “even a country as progressive as Sweden still has those stories” was also something I really wanted to tell.

And who wouldn’t be ridiculously happy when someone likes your film?

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Pictures of Leo is very loosely based on actual events which at the time raised a lot of questions about making life changing choices. To me the film is a love story first of all. And the story about a man rejecting love out of fear for what other people might think has always stayed with me. Also I wanted to try to tell a story where one of the main characters (Leo) is not really in the film.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably The Big Lebowski (1998). Or Victor/Victoria (1982).

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Seeing that this is my first film, I was very happy to find FilmFreeway. I thought I would be googling myself to death. But FilmFreeway made it so much easier to find and choose festivals and submit my film. Quick and simple.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Enjoy The Silence by Depeche Mode. Without a doubt.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I work as an actor, mostly with children theatre. I am on tour right now with a stage musical for really small kids. This summer I will be in a production of Ronia, The Robber’s Daughter at Astrid Lindgren’s World in Vimmerby, Sweden.
My husband Christian Arnold is also an actor and a filmmaker. We love working together. He has written a script that we are planning to make into a short film in the near future.

(Christian made the short film Chricke which was screened at your festival two years ago: https://lgbttorontofilmfestival.com/2018/02/25/short-film-chrickle-7min-sweden-lgbt-experimental/)

Interview with Filmmaker Julio J. Irizarry (ELPIDA)

ELPIDA was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the June 2019 LA Feedback Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Julio J. Irizarry: The motivation came from wanting to create a passion project in collaboration with my friend and co director Charlie from San Francisco. Also, being from Chicago and planning to travel to the West Coast and the Pacific Northwest to film was very motivating in knowing we would get the best production value from our locations.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

3 long years.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Universal Hope


4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle I faced was matching the post production value with the production value of the amazing locations we captured that helped tell the story. Being my first short film, I felt I owed it to the story to make sure it had great visual effects and that it was colored and sound designed the best.

Another obstacle for me was wanting the film to be perfect. This was a bit of a downfall for me which severely delayed the film due to wanting the top post production experts which we did not have a budget for. I almost gave up and never released it. In the end, through a lot of adversity and learning on my own, I ended up editing, coloring and sound designing the film. We were also able to budget just enough to license the right visual effects that helped propel the story. It was a huge challenge overall, but I believe it made me a better filmmaker and gave me the confidence to direct bigger films in the future.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was excited and a bit nervous not knowing what people would think. And hoping they got something out of it whether it was an emotion or were inspired after watching.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The main idea of the story was inspired by my friend Julia from Portland who is the woman explorer in the film. She is a wanderlust who travels the world so it was fitting to have her in the film. The deeper meanings of the film from what the voice over is saying, to hope, and the sci fi angle is inspired by my personal experiences and wanting to create unique stories that have not been seen before. A huge inspiration for me as a filmmaker is Christopher Nolan so I like to incorporate hidden meanings, multi layered substance, and non linear story telling into my work as well.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

It’s a tie between The Dark Knight and Inception. And surprisingly, I actually only really see a film once, and revisit it years later unless it’s for a film study. I like to be surprised again just like a first time viewing.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are your feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I think it’s amazing! I feel it really is an open freeway to know about so many great festivals like yours, and having the chance for my work to even be noticed is everything I could ask for as a filmmaker.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Time – Hans Zimmer

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Just recently finished directing a short film for an iPhone challenge. Other than that, what’s next is to continue studying and developing in my craft. I am leaning towards commercial directing at the moment. I believe bringing my experiences and passion of narrative storytelling into that field will only help me grow as a director.

This will also give me the ability to produce frequent content in between bigger film projects. I aspire to direct a feature some day, or even a longer short film before then. I am huge on creating something unique, so It may take a bit more time for me in between films. I look at Director’s like Tarantino and Nolan who only have a handful of films, and I am in that same mindset of creating quality over quantity.

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Interview with Filmmaker Susanne Serres (ZAYA)

ZAYA was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the November 2018 LGBT Feedback Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Susanne Serres: What motivates me to do this movie is my own experience as a queer black woman who has to do her coming out to her family.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Ssince the very beginning of the idea, it took me 1 year and a half. The shooting was made in three full days. The post prod in 2 months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Love Wins.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The dance scenes were hard to pick because we had so many choices of good materials. It was hard to choose sometimes.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was very moved by them. It was heartwarming to watch. I want to thank everyone who watch the short film and commented on it.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I wanted to combine contemporary dance and a coming out story because I felt the need to be represented into a movie and because I am a big fan of dancing even though I’m not a dancer mysel.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

C.R.A.Z.Y. by Jean-Marc Vallée

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s an amazing platform to showcase movies because it’s user friendly.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Cocorosie – Werewolf

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I am currently in the process of submiting ZAYA the full length version of this movie.

Interview with Filmmaker Ange-Régis HOUNKPATIN (VINDICTE)

VINDICTE was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the June 2018 European FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Ange-Régis HOUNKPATIN: My motivation was to make a film that would be different from usual African movies, in terms of style, rhythm and aesthetics. But still an African subject.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you
to make this short?

I think it took almost one year and a half.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Relentless chase.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Honestly, the biggest obstacle was myself. I didn’t want to give a bad image of my country, so at first I restricted myself a lot. Then I thought about how South Korean directors don’t back up from the most creepy aspects of their societies, and I decided to go on.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking
about your film in the feedback video?

It felt weird to see strangers talking about my movie without me in the room ! It’s the first time I got to witness this. I was really happy about the last intervention, the last viewer really understood the subtext about control. It is the first time I hear someone clearly explain it; I was moved. I felt my voice had a meaning.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea came from scenes I witnessed when I was younger, living in Benin. Growing up, I discovered these kind of behavior were also detailed in the classic movie “Fury” by Fritz Lang, and realised it could be a universal subject, a cinematic one.

i wanted to shoot a movie in my hometown, so I decided to make a movie about it. I spoke to my producers (who were then my classmates) about it, and they were really very excited.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Blade Runner, by Ridley Scott.

But the one I truly know by heart, by soul and by spirit, is “Hyenas” from Djibril Diop Mambety.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

If I only say one song it wouldn’t be a honest answer, there are too many. But since I’m a child I’ve listened a lot of Michael Jackson’s songs, so let’s say “Beat it”, to stay in the theme.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’ve completed a short movie just after this one: “Pantheon” and it is in the festival circuit right now.

Next is a new short film, and then a feature one.

Wish me luck ! Thank you !

vindicte

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Animator/Filmmaker Tim Ballard (OH MY…)

 OH MY… played to rave reviews at the June 2018 Animation FEEDBACK Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Tim Ballard: My friend Michael is a San Francisco area musician who asked me to make an animated music video for one of his songs. The song made me think of a sort of dream journey, and I wanted to depict themes and images that had been in my mind for awhile – environmental apocalypse, indigenous cultures, the desert toad.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I worked on this in pieces over the course of a year – much longer than I anticipated. It was a sort of learn as you go process with the technical aspects of the various adobe software platforms.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Imaginative resurrection.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Mostly as I said above, the technical aspects of getting the watercolor effect to coloring, learning the ins and outs of a larger scale project than I was used to in the past. Also – time and money were tight, of course.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I felt disappointed that it seemed to have only elicited a bad acid flashback for most people and didn’t resonate or make sense in a dream logic sort of way as I had hoped. Many of the images were from sort of personal imagery, but I’d hoped it would make some symbolic sense to some people. If not, I hoped people enjoyed the combination of image and mousic.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Believe it or not there were no drugs involved in the conception or execution of this animation (besides coffee and whiskey).

I’ll do my best to answer below, forgive me if it is a little long!

It was a combination of the feel I got from the song itself and vignettes or motifs I’d had swirling in my mind for a long time before.
The song, for me, conjured up a sense of flying and floating and a sort of journey that climaxes in awe, but also speaks of some sadness or difficulties being transcended. I added to that the themes I’ve mentioned above: apocalypse, wastelands, the writings of Zhuangzi, an interest in indigenous cultures and ethnobotany, an interest in what I guess I’ll call “the ontology of imagination” and, (as someone in the audience correctly pointed out) the Sonoran desert toad.

Because it seemed to not translate well to the audience, I’ll summarize the narrative here: basically, the main character starts off in a post-apocalyptic desert wasteland, looking exhausted and alone. Then he finds a cave entrance with mysterious petroglyphs that leads to a subterranean lake where there is water and spirit guides in the form of three animal headed beings waiting to greet him. An elixir is given and he sinks into a dream journey/ sinks into the lake. He’s brought up from the depth to the lake surface which becomes the same wasteland desert surface. He awakens after passing over the dormant, dreaming frog in the soil. He rises and flies towards a distant city that is populated with creatures having a ceremony of some sort. I turns out it was a ceremony to coax water and life from the dead dry land. Raindrops begin to fall. Then he awakens on the lake’s edge at the same time the frog awakens under the earth. The story is bookended by the moment the water hits the soil, awakening life from the dead land.

The Sonoran desert toad fascinated me when I heard them in the desert after a rain and someone told me they are hibernating under the dry desert soil most of the year and suddenly arise when the rain comes to mate and sing in the rainwater ponds. Also in this time of year, flowers and plants you never assumed were there, burst through dry, cracked soil with a vigor that is as inspiring as it is beautiful. Obviously it seems like a sort of Lazarus-esque resurrection. In my imagination I liked to think that the toads spend more of their life in a dreaming state down under the soil than in a waking state and that the dream state was more real for them than the waking state. Then a few years later I heard that they have a hallucinogenic mucus which only added to their mystique for me. So, in my mind, the world represented in the animation is like a manifestation of the toad’s dream, and the completion of the ceremony reawakens life in the dead land in the way imagination can reawaken vitality in our personal lives.

So there are a few layers of dreams – I was inspired by Zhuangzi’s story of the butterfly dream on this part – and for better or worse I wanted it to be a little ambiguous.

Anyhow, the basic theme is in the hope that even in desperate times we can still find life and potential beneath the surface with which we might be able to manifest a rebirth or resurrection of sorts.

So, yeah, basically an acid trip.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Hmmm. Probably Milo and Otis or The Road Warrior.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It certainly makes it a lot easier and very streamlined. I appreciate it.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I’d like to choose one of my favorite songs but in reality it is probably the “Happy Birthday Song” or a Christmas carol like “Santa Claus is Coming to Town”

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I am hoping to start a series of short, 3min or less, animated documentaries about food and cultural history – how a single ingredient or dish can tell the history of a culture.

oh_my_2

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Andy Koeger (ROSIE, OH)

ROSIE, OH was the winner of BEST FILM at the May 2018 FEEDBACK Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Andy Koeger: My co-creator Apple Xenos originally had the idea for the film. I was so drawn to her idea that I was inspired to create it with her as my Senior Thesis Film at SCAD, the Savannah College of Art and Design. We became obsessed with creating a story that took place all in one singular moment in a person’s life.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

We had the idea the summer before our last year of art school. I made the film as a thesis project, where students were given 10 week for development, 10 weeks of preproduction and production, and 10 weeks of postproduction. All in all, it took us a year to create the film from start to finish.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Experiential moment.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

There were so many obstacles in creating a one-shot short film. We troubleshooted the technical aspects so thoroughly that they became significantly less of a challenge as we figured out the best way to make the film feel seamless. My biggest fear however was in finding the right actress for the lead role, as that performance would basically become the entire film. We got really lucky when we found Maddie Dixon-Poirier, the lead actress.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It was cool to hear from the audience without me having to be involved in the discussion! I heard a couple new things from audience members, which was cool. The film has been circulating film festivals for about a year and a half, so I had heard lots and lots of opinions, concerns, questions, and praise throughout it’s distribution process. The film generally garners extreme opinions, and this audience was no different in that.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Apple came up with the idea, then together we decided to create the film in one single shot, which really transformed the way we told the story.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Pulp Fiction is my favorite film. I’m drawn to it’s iconography, vibes, and how it gets you to think outside the box about what film is and what it can be.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I love it! FilmFreeway makes learning about and submitting to festivals super easy. I appreciate how the contact info is readily available for the festivals so I can reach out to them directly.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Super unrelated to my filmmaking but probably Xtal by Aphex Twin. That kinda early 90’s electronic music relates more to my next film I guess : )

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes! I’ve made two other shorts since Rosie, Oh, and I also direct lots of commercials and music videos. I live in LA but travel frequently for my shoots. I’m currently writing a feature screenplay with my film school dream-team Dan Frantz and Clayton McCracken, which we aim to bring to the big screen in the next couple years. I’m not going to give away too many deets about the film, but it’s an aggressive and drug-fueled journey of a group of rag-tag kids who run a pirate-radio station in the early 90’s. It’s going to be super weird, vibey, and a lot of fun.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.