Interview with Award Winning Filmmaker Sreejith Nair (THE COLOR OF ME)

THE COLOR OF ME was the winner of BEST PERFORMANCES at the September 2018 LA FEEDBACK Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Sreejith Nair: This approach to the topic of racism and insecurity really came from the fact that I am Indian, but I am born and raised in America. Here in America, people look at me like I am a foreigner, but I don’t feel like one. In India, I don’t look like a foreigner, but I feel like one. I face a lot of judgment from other Indians when they find out I don’t speak Hindi, or I don’t watch Bollywood films that often, or that I have limited knowledge of Indian customs or traditions. Throughout my whole life, it seemed like I was a part of two worlds, but never completely belonged in either of them. I often questioned “how Indian” I really am. Some of my friends joke around with me by saying “I fail as an Indian.” Are there certain things I’m supposed to be doing just because I’m Indian? I have often questioned, “What if I was a black person” or “What if I was white?”, would my life be so different? Could I still be the same person if I wasn’t Indian? What if my skin could change color? So I wanted to write a story that asked, “If I am a person of a different race or ethnicity, how much is my race supposed to define me? If I am a person of color, can I still have the freedom to be whoever I want without worrying about representing my ethnicity?” I want this story to show that you can be anyone, no matter what color you are.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

1 year of writing
2 months of pre-production
6 days of shooting
1 year of editing
5 months of post-sound

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Racist fairytale

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Directing 5 actresses to play the same role, and directing one actor to act along aside 5 different woman as if she was the same person. I don’t know of any other film that uses this technique of having multiple actresses play the same role, so it was my chance to come up with new directorial skills.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

The comments that I really loved was when an audience member said, “I can relate to this movie”. That comment really showed me that this movie accomplished it’s mission of addressing the issue of racism while still being a fantasy film about a girl with a curse. And just listening to the audience talk about scenes in the film and connecting it to their actual life really raised my spirits and made me believe we did a film that is important.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

When the idea became about a girl who changes skin color, I immediately wanted to do a fairytale. She grew up with this curse and believes that not having white skin is considered ugly. When you have a character who is experiencing something supernatural, you have to have a regular person to serve as the entry point to introducing the supernatural element, otherwise the audience may not be able to follow it. I didn’t want the main character to be Indian like me, I wanted to step out of my own box for this film, I decided to make him an adopted African-American. Having my main character, Lewis, be adopted was a reflection of how I’m an Indian man raised in America, so we both have the insecurity of being raised in a community outside our skin color. With that, you have a story of two characters, with two different upbringings expressing their views of the world, and in this case, how your skin color is perceived.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The entire Godzilla franchise, is my favorite movie franchise of all time.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I love FilmFreeway, I use it all the time. It’s a very quick and easy way to find festivals and submit to them. I recommend it for all filmmakers.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I don’t necessarily have a favorite song.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

My ultimate goal is to get this in front of as many producers as possible and hopefully make The Color of Me feature film.

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Interview with Filmmaker Larissa Pruett (GET HOME SAFE)

GET HOME SAFE was the winner of BEST FILM at the September 2018 Comedy FEEDBACK Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Larissa Pruett: I was journaling on this concept of two women competing to see how far they could make it down an alley before they died. I thought it was hilarious but realized that the concept was short lived…(haha). I brought the concept to a table read and someone suggested I make it into a video game. GENIUS! Side note: So thankful for all the table reads and discussions I have with people about concepts. I could have never come up with this idea alone or even make this film alone so I really love table reads and anytime I get to work with groups of like minded comedians. Anyway, After writing down everything I could think of with a video game and women going out I realized I had too much material. I brought it to a few table reads and flushed it out. I decided to make it based of the reactions alone and encouragement my friends were giving me. I had so much positive feedback that I knew there was no way I couldn’t make this film and lucky for me my talented friends wanted to help.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took about 2 months of writing it and then 2 days of shooting. The editing process took much longer, about 8 months because I couldn’t do the editing myself for this one because we started editing it on a new program I hadn’t learned yet. Then I had to pull favors and see if my friends could help me edit and so since it was a free project we took our time. Once we finished that one of my good friends Pablo Ruff-Berganza learned how to do all of the special effects basically overnight and did them all for me. He’s the real hero.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Real life

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The editing, for sure. Getting special effects to line up with my timing that I had written before. I also believe I became a better writer by the time I was in the editing process of this film so I had to battle with my past self on why I chose to do what I did. At the end of the day it was a beautiful experience for me to have gone through.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Gratitude. I feel so blessed and joyous to hear people discuss the film. I love hearing disagreements and am absolutely shocked when it turns into a discussion on the differences between men and women and how we behave. I love hearing what I could have done better to make it clearer because it will make me a better filmmaker. My favorite thing though is having women react to it, I love hearing them laugh too hard because it is honestly too real.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Journaling. I try to free write most days for at least a few minutes. I remember watching men behave walking home one night with my male friends and they were having the time of their life, they had no fear of death or interaction with strangers. I compared it to walking home alone from my car to my house and realized that I usually have 911 dialed up on my phone while walking if I get scared. That’s when I wrote in my journal “concept: Two women compete to see how far down the alley way each can get without dying. “Claire made it 200 yards last week”

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Young Frankenstein by Mel Brooks. I watched it growing up and was shocked to see that I was laughing at different things later in my life.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

FilmFreeway is wonderful but submitting to festivals is painful. It’s like taking all of the extra cash you have to buy food with, throwing it into a toilet and then flushing. 6 months later you get an email that says you made it into a festival you never even remembered submitting to and they ask for 1,000 things you’re not prepared for. It’s an overwhelming experience that is absolutely necessary for us to suffer and go through. However, sitting in a theater watching it being put up and hearing laughter makes it all worth it.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

I’m not really someone that listens to music, but I will say that if I do listen to anything it’s Bo Burnham, Can’t Handle This (Kanye Rant) on repeat because it is so inspiring to me.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I’m writing/directing a new short that will hopefully be done by the end of November. I’m co-writing a pilot episode with a good friend of mine and directing a few web series.
Get Home Safe - Best Comedy Film

Interview with the Filmmaking Team of the Award Winning Short Film “HOTTER WITH THE WINDOWS OPEN”

Director Julie Haberstick. Writer John Houston. Winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the August 2018 Romance Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

John: I wanted to tell a story that wasn’t the usual romantic story but would somehow bind these two people together no matter how badly they needed to be torn apart. Or maybe vice versa. Also, this is Footprint Productions’ first film, so we wanted to showcase the talents of our team. We didn’t have a huge budget, so we were trying to make something compelling within the confines of our apartment.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

John: I wrote the script pretty quickly, Julie and I did some re-writes and planning. We shot within a month or so, plus some reshoots. Then, because our budget was so small, we really relied on favors. So I think it took us the better part of two years to get the film finalized and ready to be seen by the world.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Heartbreaking Growth.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Julie: Halfway through filming the most emotional scene in the film, our production was shut down due to a location dispute. We had to pack up immediately, and we weren’t sure how to move forward. We chose to have an impromptu wrap party at a bar down the street (complete with karaoke), and picked up shooting a few months later. Thankfully, that pause allowed us to sink our teeth into the scene in a whole new way.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Julie: To see Hotter affect the audience, for the creative choices to elicit emotions in ways we intended—and even in ways we didn’t—is incredibly gratifying.

John: It felt good to hear people talking about the film, reacting to it. Sympathizing with our characters, enjoying the heightened language of love.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:


6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

John: I started thinking about what sort of love is forbidden and impossible… truly impossible, when the two must remain in each other’s lives, tethered. I also wanted to love and hate both characters, to feel for them, root for and against them. I especially wanted to make the leading man appealing, flawed, heartbreaking, and heartbroken.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

John: Remember the Titans. I think I could quote the whole thing pretty accurately.

Julie: I have to admit 10 Things I Hate About You is my guilty pleasure…

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Submission platforms are really convenient. They could be a little more user-friendly, but I’m sure in time they will make it easier and easier for people to get their films seen.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

John: I listened to a lot of Tina Turner as a kid. And the Beatles and Elvis. But the individual song? There were a few angsty years where a couple Coldplay songs or Johnny Cash were on repeat.

Julie: The Big Chill soundtrack, and California Dreamin’ by the Mamas and the Papas are my most listened-to albums. But “More Than a Feeling” by Boston is my number one song.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Footprint’s next film is almost ready for a festival run. Don’t forget the name Footprint Productions because we have some awesome things in the works.

hotter_with_the_windows_open

Interview with Filmmaker Michael Willer (The Volunteer)

THE VOLUNTEER was the winner of BEST PERFORMANCES at the August 2018 FANTASY/SCI-FI Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Michael Willer: I love films that highlight a strong female perspective, usually flipping the dynamic where the woman has the power and the know-how, and she’s the one who is actively involved in the plot and making things happen. That and shooting out in the wilderness, the woods, which I love, were huge selling points.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The process took almost exactly 2 years, from the time that Sarah sent me the script to the time that post was finished. Part of that was a slow development process, and once we started shooting it took about 6 months to finish.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Dystopian romance

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

This project was strangely blessed. We kept checking ourselves, knowing that something would go horribly wrong, but no… the worst that happened was a series of locations we’d planned on weren’t available when we showed up to shoot (a bridge had been removed from the stream we wanted to cross). But that resulted in finding a new location and my favorite shot in the film (the long shot early on when he’s chasing after her trying to convince her to help him… magic hour, bugs flying in the foreground, shafts of sunlight, it just all clicked).

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I got giddy. I was actually in the room at the screening and got to listen firsthand to people’s feedback and it blew me away. The word “perfect” was thrown around a couple times, which just wows me. I’m so proud of our little film. We were a tiny team, just 4 of us on set, and just me in post-production. I couldn’t be happier with the reception.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

From Sarah, the creator: “I was and always am into Star Wars and desperately wanted to work on something female-driven in a scifi world that had that post-apocalypse vibe. Something that featured a strong woman as the lead and the savior type, rather than a man.”

For my part helping in the development, I knew Sarah and Schoen (now married) had to star together in something. I’d just seen them in a play together and man, it just felt wasteful not to put them on screen after that.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Probably Inception or Fight Club. The craftmanship that went into those films is mindblowing. I could watch either on repeat and find new things to marvel at. (That’s a super limited look at my tastes, though!)

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

FilmFreeway is so easy to use. As long as the festival’s self description is clear, I have no concerns about submitting through that platform.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Well, I know I’ve actually counted the number of times I listened to Celine Neon’s “Vacation Time” because I shot their music video and I was really immersing myself (it’s somewhere around 100). But honestly, probably “Falling For The First Time” by Barenaked Ladies. Love that song.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I just wrapped a documentary shoot in South Africa and a 48 Hour Film Project shoot which was exhausting… But! The team I got together for that was amazing and I’m going to set us up as a creator collective, producing shorts in an anthology style web series.

 
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Linda Gasser (WHAT IF)

WHAT IF was the winner of BEST FILM at the August 2018 Los Angeles FEEDBACK Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Linda Gasser: What if (with the original title: Wo sie ist) is a film about the future, but it is about presence too. In the past I had worked on films for a large IT company, it is “the” large IT company that everyone will know. Working with them was like working in the future. When I began to understand not only what it meant to collect big-data, but rather how intense the impact of it’s analytics are, I kind of already did live in that future. I feel that the genre definition Sci-Fi doesn’t really fit to the film, because it really is about the society in an individual in an oppressive society dominated by algorithms.

From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

From the idea to the actual shooting block it actually went quite quick. I wrote the screenplay in December and was working on a documentary in South Afrika in the beginning of the following year. Coming back I had only 3 months for the entire production – considering the production design with its scenery of which a lot had to be built by hand, this is pretty much “no time at all”.

How would you describe your short film in two words!?

intuition vs. algorithm

What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The budget! Telling an entire futuristic environment including many diverse locations was a great challenge. In a dense short like What if the surrounding becomes an additional protagonist – this precise concept sometimes made it hard: The protagonist is working with wood, a material that appears nowhere else then in his workshop. Finding locations without any trees or wooden elements ended up being an outrageous dare.

Sometimes the tight budged forced us to stay quite flexible in this very detailed design concept. Because the budget was tight we had to be flexible: Everything was there for a reason and if a furniture didn’t fit we had to establish a reason so it did. I remember throwing up the color concept when a large blue Eggchair was delivered on shooting day 6 and couldn’t be replaced. The colours of most upcoming scenes were influenced and blue ended up as a predominant color in the film. Luckily in the post-production I had support and our DoP eventually ended up being a great Executive Producer and handled keeping on track with the many visual artists.

What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Well, to be honest. I did get goosebumps right in the beginning, due to the very charming and benevolent voice at the start of the video. I must confess that I was nervous – I had never heard feedback about the film where people didn’t tell me personally. Of course I read feedback, but writing people care differently about finding the right words. I loved the audiences reactions and was exited that they had specifically talked about the ending. I must say that even if it is that open, no-one had actually ever asked be about it. So the theme the discussion was about surprised me.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Well this is very much connected to the first question about my motivation. But actually there was an additional specific incident. I had broken up with my long-term partner. He was ready to work on us and organised appointments for a couple therapy. This was actually funny: a sturdy, flower-bloused lady with low glasses (really just as you’d imagine) sat in the large winged chair and asked questions. At the end of the first session she gave us the link to an online quest so that we learn about who we are and if we fit together. The evening before the next session we actually filled out the test and found out we match – of course he was all about it but I couldn’t imagine how even a phycologist could be trustful with this exerpt about our emotions based on a fact-machine.
The next day I was working for the company that deals with real-time analytics and fascinating algorithms. The combination of those absurdities formed the basic idea.

What film have you seen the most in your life?

Phew… since I am reviewing for the Arc Film Festival in the third year it’ll probably be on of those. Definitely is. Films I watched the most were Doors of Perception from Caroline Schwarz, Wave by Benjamin Clearly, Einstein-Rosen by Olga Osorio, ..

A well known American Film are 2 Days in Paris by July Delpy or Eternal Sunshine of the spotless mind by Michel Gondry
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You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

On FilmFreeway there are black sheeps in between the festivals. I must say that I do see it from 2 sides. I am in the great position to b invited to festivals all around Europe and beyond. From this side I am experiencing that many of the small festivals really make sure their guests (the filmmakers) get the most out of the time at the festival, whereas large festivals, may be precious and have a strong representative effect, but some smaller festivals offer an excellent hotbed for creativity and connect in an intimate atmosphere. Lets put it like that: When a large festival feels like work, it is worth visiting small spaces to have some extra holiday.

What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Once I had the chance to work on a video for a great German jazz band: The Max Clouth Clan. Most of the songs from their LP “Kamaloka” are probably in the fron of that hitlist.

What is next for you? A new film?

Currently I am working on my debut film, debut in feature length fiction. “Mimosa Preciosa” tells the story about Gabriela and Georg. A feiry spanish lady, that lives together with the German game-developer Georg. When Georg accidentally deletes Gabi’s collection of digital photographs and the only proof of her past, the two set out on a road trip to recreate her photos and restore her memories. While Gsbi longs for the past. Georg dreams of the future. But both remain out of reach until they learn to walk in the present.

I am very glad to be working together with my co-aothor Valery Dalena, who lives in the States. With the new technologies we were able to work together productively transcontinental.  

 
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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Aaron Seever (TEMPORARY)

TEMPORARY played to rave reviews at the August 2018 Los Angeles FEEDBACK Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Aaron Seever: I wanted to write something for me and my friend Shelly (actress) to work on together as well as share this gorgeous setting with the world.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

18 months for the first edit, 4 years til the current one screened here.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Kindred spirits.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Shooting on location with a very small budget and crew.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I felt pride with how the audience related to the story and the characters. It touched my heart.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I wanted to write a love story that didnt last forever. Just one that was unbelievably good but fleeting. I think that is more realistic to life.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Good Will Hunting

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Its very easy to submit to many festivals. I actually think it might be better if it was a little more involved to submit films to festivals.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have a short comedy in the festival circuit now called The Secret Lives of Teachers as well as another film way out of my comfort zone still in production. A gore/romance called Finally, You.

Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Eshaana Sheth (THE BUTTER KNIFE)

THE BUTTER KNIFE played to rave reviews at the July 2018 FEMALE Feedback Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Eshaana Sheth: The film is a response to the variety of people that I encountered after moving to LA as well as the nuances of dating and socializing in the modern age. In 2016, I developed a strange ailment of consistently and exclusively attracting men from the UK into my life (yes, I met the one Northern Irish guy in LA). The summer of 2016 held a strange mix of events; The EU referendum took place simultaneously to the Euro 2016 Championship. Both sort of intertwined and produced a malaise in the air especially with our own American presidential election around the corner. It felt like a paradigm shift, and that kind of uncertainty creates excellent fodder for humor. I’m always interested in capturing how topical ideas and events bleed into the way we relate to one another and how our cultural life is increasingly influenced by globalization and the advent of technology. I wanted to find a way of condensing all that into a short film. I was approached as a writer by Shalini, our producer and lead actress, and came on later as a director and producer. It was my first time directing, but I’m really happy I took the plunge. Our whole team was incredible and made the experience so nurturing.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I had the idea brewing, but I ended up writing it when I was sick and recovering from surgery in May of 2017, which provided some time to introspect and look to humor as a way of healing. It was completed in January 2018. So, the whole thing took about a year and a half.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Absurd normalcy

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

We had a small team and budget. Trying to get the best production value with logistical and monetary restraints is always difficult. You always say, I wish I could’ve done this or had more bodies in general. But working with a contained story also creates room for play, especially when you have wonderfully talented actors and cinematographers like we did. It’s important as a director to adapt and allow the characters and vision to change. My friend analogized it to the creation of a pot—when it comes out of the kiln, it’s either awful, exactly what you pictured, or not really what you intended but still pretty. Of course, I’m a horrible with ceramics, so I should be lucky for options two or three.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was surprised by how hysterically everyone was laughing; I wasn’t expecting that level of enthusiasm. They were patient viewers and so invested in the work, which I appreciated. I especially loved that the film resonated with people of all ages. My favorite comedy to consume as a viewer is work like Frasier, which feel niche but also accessible and timeless. The diversity of comments made me feel like there was something in it for everyone, which is quite nice to hear.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Without ruining anything, the premise was loosely inspired by a first date I went on, that I kind of tried to make as weird as possible. I used that as a starting point and then just let my imagination snowball from there. I’m one of those people who tries to find the absurdity in banal situations like grocery shopping. I’d almost rather sit in a bit of discomfort and awkwardness than run away, because it’s more fun. I find it difficult to approach organized events like dates or meetings without analyzing how fundamentally odd it all is, like, anthropologically. Ria is probably more like me than any other character I’ve written – she’s confronting but anxious which makes her a cool blend of idiosyncratic and unpredictable.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I guess it would have to be either Muppet Treasure Island or Pooh’s Grand Adventure. As a kid, I rented them weekly at our local video store. It was so embarrassing; they used to have them ready for me before I even walked through the doors. If I took childhood out of the equation, it would probably be Clueless.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I really like FilmFreeway. It’s very streamlined and makes things simple and organized. I would definitely recommend it to other filmmakers.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

“Spiderwebs” by No Doubt! I know everyone loves the ’90s right now, but I feel like I have a special claim on the decade, having understood its character at a young age before people were talking about it as a thing. No Doubt is just so emblematic of my youth, growing up in suburban Southern California with two older brothers. As an Indian American, we were floored at the time to discover that Tony Kanal, the bassist with the frosted tips, was also Indian. There were virtually no Asians in media to the point where there was even a rumor circulating in my hometown that Brandon Boyd of Incubus was part Indian because one of his “Pardon Me”s sounded like he had an accent. People were literally reaching for straws. Kanal was the only kernel of hope for brown representation.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have another short film in post-production called The Argument that’s adapted from a play I wrote in college; it’s a relationship drama set in 2012 before the Mayan Apocalypse phenomenon. I’ve also been doing some modeling and getting back into acting, which feels great! I have a few other projects in the works including a series I’m helping my brother with, which is fun because we can yell at each other and still remain related.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.