Interview with Filmmakers Lucy Joan Barnes & Ali Causon (FOR WANT OF A NAIL)

FOR WANT OF A NAIL played to rave reviews at the April 2019 Female Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Lucy (director): The script and it’s message, it was not trying to “sugarcoat” what having OCD is really like.. it was showing how intense it can be for the person who suffers from it.

Ali (producer): Although I was not looking for a script that specifically focused on mental health, after reading FWOAN just a couple of times, it felt like a natural follow up to my previous short about PTSD.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

Lucy: I believe it was about a year…

Ali: Writer Nick and I had been working together for a few months before mainly to find a director we wanted to work with. Lucy, Nick and I then ran a development workshop with volunteers from OCD Action and Actors to learn more about the condition.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Lucy: Frank and Eye Opening

Ali: Honest

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Lucy:Finding Marty and a shower to film in πŸ™‚

Ali:Definitely finding a shower! Our Actor Clark is quite tall

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Lucy: I may not have agreed with all the feedback, but I can see where people came from, I learnt a lot , I will take on what has been said and it use it to evolve as a director

Ali: Excited! We had some really interesting feedback and although not everyone enjoyed the film, it certainly had them talking! For me that is the best result, the only way to raise awareness for mental health conditions, like OCD, is to talk about it. ‘For Want Of A Nail’ has been lucky enough to have full support and endorsement from OCD Action, the charity were very much involved in production from development to final film. It has always been important to me to show an honest portrayal of OCD.

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Lucy: Nick had already written the script but the idea of adding animation was the first thing that came to mind when I read it..

Ali: Nick, our writer, suffers with OCD. He was inspired to write the script as a cathartic experience to try and get to grips with his Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Lucy: Old Boy

Ali: Star Wars!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Lucy: I think it’s great

Ali: Very user friendly system.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Lucy: Oh that’s a hard one.. probably Bohemian Rhapsody

Ali: Same as Lu!

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Lucy: I’m adapting a Shakespeare for a modern audience looking at the mental health of the character and hopefully get people to connect with Shakespeare more

Ali: I’m in the process of pitching the ‘For Want Of A Nail’ TV series and have just completed post for a feature film called ‘The Hidden Track’ which is due for release later this year.

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Interview with Filmmaker Annabelle Frost (G(R)O(W)ING UP)

G(R)O(W)ING UP was the winner of BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY at the April 2019 Female Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Annabelle Frost: My boss at the time encouraged me to make a film as he knew I had professional directing aspirations.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

I started seriously writing this version of the short (there were others!) in December of 2015. We shot it in June of 2016. I finally finished post, with music coming in last, in September of 2017. So a little less than 2 years total.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Romantic & visual

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Probably money. We spent a lot more than I would’ve liked b/c we had to a have a fire safety officer with us all 3 days and yet there was no ‘short film’ break on that. We had to pay what a full budget Hollywood film would’ve paid. Our location wasn’t cheap either BUT I believe it was worth it because it looked so strong on film it gave the piece a rich, visual unity.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

My initial reaction was: grateful. It’s so hard to get honest reviews of your work and because you are so close to it as the artist you can’t really ever get a good, objective perspective on it yourself. It’s invaluable to hear what someone, who’s just watching it in a theater without having read the script or participated in the shoot, has to say about their experience viewing it.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I had been kicking around a split screen idea that would track a relationship from beginning to end. I needed to keep the story simple because the structure was going to be complex. Ultimately, the structure was TOO complex to work as a 10 minute short film so I ended up writing this version that tracks a relationship as it goes up and down with a bit of structural complexity but not as much as I was originally going for.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Young Sherlock Holmes.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Worked great! No issues at all.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

It’s got to be a tie between Sting’s “Be Still My Beating Heart” and Peter Gabriel’s “Red Rain”.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I directed an episode of Gotham last season. Hoping to direct more episodes of television soon!

Interview with Filmmaker Roisin Kearney (THE FAMILY WAY)

THE FAMILY WAY was the winner of BEST FILM at the January 2019 Female Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Roisin Kearney: I had produced two short films after having a break from film making. I had found it difficult to work in the industry after the birth of my 3 children. The impact of parenthood on your life is very dramatic and it is a subject not often looked at. I had been on a screenwriting course and one of our assignments was on the subject of an unplanned pregnancy and it went from there, I went on to develop the idea with Nuno Bernardo. Abortion was illegal at the time in Ireland and being hotly debated, a woman had died of sepsis during a miscarriage because a heart beat was detected and the 8th amendment to the constitution (equal right to life of mother and fetus) meant that doctors could not intervene until there was proof that the Mother would die if they did not intervene, unfortunately it was too late by the time they did.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It took about six months from the time the first draft was written.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Heart v Head

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Money (of course) as we didn’t have any and locations. People were great and allowed us use their premises for free but it was a lot of work getting them all and keeping to a small budget and timeframe.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was delighted they could identify with the characters, Mother Daughter relationships are universal, and although set in Ireland it was great to see the audience could empathize with the situation and enjoy the comedy as well as the drama.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

While doing a course with Mary Kate O Flanagan.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

The Rocky Horror Show (I worked in a cinema where it played for years) and The Green Mile (on a lot and always worth a watch)

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is the only platform I use. Simple and easy to track what you are entering.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Kate Bush Withering Heights


10. What is next for you? A new film?

I have 3 other films currently touring
Prodigy ( written and directed by Naomi Sheridan)
Algorithms ( Written and directed by me)
No Dogs ( Written and directed by me)

I am also looking at making my first feature film.Β 

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Interview with Screenwriter Tali Zingman (HEADSTRONG)

Matthew Toffolo: What is your screenplay about?

Tali Zingman: Alice (32), a girl plagued by her own self-criticism and loathing, has just caught her boyfriend of five years cheating. Faced with the double-edged question of what to do, Alice confronts the different, zany sides of her personality. In this inner battle of the mind, she must weigh out what she is more afraid of: being in an unstable relationship or being alone.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Comedy, drama, psychological piece

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

Film often uses tropes for their depiction of female characters: the traditional mother, the punk rebel, the girl-next-door. Headstrong takes these tropes and shows that they can exist all within the same girl. The female lead is complex, multi-faceted, and most importantly, authentic. The film also addresses the themes of mental illness, anxiety, and feminism. Alice’s inner battle is one that so many girls unfortunately face in the modern age. They are instilled within this self-criticism and the social pressure to be dependent and a care-giver, rather than a self-functioning and thriving individual. For a short film, it covers a great deal of ground all under the accessible format of an innocuous comedy.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Self-love story (Hyphens count, right?)

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Nightmare Before Christmas.

6. How long have you been working on this screenplay?

Two years.

7. How many stories have you written?

Over 30.

8. What is your favorite song? (Or, what song have you listened to the most times in your life?)

Lately, it’s been “Nobody” by Mitski.

9. What obstacles did you face to finish this screenplay?

I struggled with the “cheese-factor”, mainly because I don’t usually write rom-coms. When I started, I didn’t realize that what this was, at the end of the day, was a girl learning to fall in love with herself. At the end, when she goes around the room and tells the different sides she loves them, she’s finally accepts every part of herself and validates that she loves them. That to me felt dramatic, but at the same time, I questioned “Why?” Why is it so taboo to say you love yourself just the way you are? That for me was my own self-discovery.

10. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Nothing…except caramel frappuccinos and my dog.

11. You entered your screenplay via FilmFreeway. What has been your experiences working with the submission platform site?

I found my experience with Female Film Festival to be extremely positive. They are personable, enthusiastic, and really focused on building a safe environment which nurtures each artist. I was truly touched by their constant passion and investment in my work.

12. What influenced you to enter the festival? What were your feelings on the initial feedback you received?

I felt very proud of this script and wanted the right platform to present it. I found the festival’s mission to be exactly the right fit. The feedback was timely, constructive, and extremely helpful.

Β Watch the Screenplay Reading:

Alice, age 32, is a self-conscious girl with a bitter dilemma: what to do after catching her boyfriend of 5 years cheating. It’s up to her and the kooky sides of her personality in her head to decide. This is one epic inner battle.

CAST LIST:

Revenge – KAT SMILEY
NARRATION – STEPHEN SANDQUIST
Mother – JULIE SHEPPARD
Alice – JESSICA BOWMER

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Interview with Filmmaker Kaue Nunes Melo (MAXWELL’S DEMON)

MAXWELL’S DEMON was the winner BEST FILM at the December 2018 Female FEEDBACK Film Festival.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Kaue Nunes Melo: I read an article about a girl that suffered from hipersexuality that discovered that she was abused by her father when she was young, but suppressed that memory growing up. The article was about the long lasting effects of child molestation and was an interesting subject, as a lot of the people that was molested as child became sexual predators themselves. That was a spark for me. Tell a story about people making the same mistakes as their parents.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

about 6/7 months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Shockiling depressing!

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Money! The whole movie was self financed. In order to get good actors and a good crew i had to have a second job for 6 months to pay the short film.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

I was nervous that my original message could’t be transmitted properly. Turns out, a lot of people got it.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

I answer that in the question 01

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Not one.. several. From the usual suspects: Tarantino, Spielberg, Scorcese, Coppola, Pta, Kubrick, Linch, Fincher, Coeh brothers, Wes Anderson, Nolan. etc

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

Is probably the best platform for submission. Is easy to use and very intuitive

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Not sure, I listen several song, depending on the mood. I like film scores when Im writing my short films.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes. Working in a couple projects that i would love to produce in the upcoming year.

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Interview with Filmmaker Liz Lachman (PIN-UP)

PIN-UP played at the October 2018 Los Angeles FEEDBACK Film Festival to rave reviews.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Liz Lachman: This film was motivated by my own experiences and artist friends experiences of feeling never good enough and emotionally “empty,” always searching for perfection in our work, ourselves, everything outside of ourselves. On closer examination I realized that the feeling of being loved was actually the thing we were all in search of.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The short was actually taken from my feature film script- so not including the writing of that, I would say from writing to final mix was probably a year.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Psychological, haunting

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

The biggest obstacle was not enough money to shoot for more days. We had to cram probably too much into the 4 days we could afford and that meant some artistry suffered. We couldn’t take the time to set up the shots we had planned so all of a sudden lots more handheld camera… stuff like that. It still works, but I would have liked to see what we actually had planned to shoot!

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Initially, when the MC asked what people thought about my film – there was dead silence. My stomach and heart sank. But then she shared her own feelings and it seemed to open everyone up and then they started talking about their reactions. And it was SO OVERWHELMINGLY POSITIVE that I was thrilled!

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea for the short was based on my feature script- but instrumental in the idea for that was that I became physically attracted to a painting of a pin-up calendar girl. I was so blown away over what triggered that in me- how that could happen, that I began to examine what was behind it all. And then … down the rabbit hole!

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

If you’re asking which film I’ve seen the most times- the answer- no question- is GROUNDHOG DAY. In the guise of comedy, that film examines some very deep and wonderful themes! And it’s hilarious.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

FilmFreeway is SO EASY! They keep track of things, remind you if you’ve already submitted, let you know what festivals are upcoming- it’s easy to see what you’ve submitted to with results, it’s a user friendly platform. Really like it.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

As a former singer/songwriter- I’ve probably listened the most to MY OWN songs- RUMBLE is probably my favorite (you can hear it on my website http://www.lizlachman.com). When I couldn’t get the rights to the song I wanted for Pin-Up I decided to put one of my own songs, RELENTLESS, in there and it worked great! BUT barring my own work- my all-time favorite that I never get tired of hearing- and a brilliant song, probably a perfect song: “WHY” by Annie Lennox. OMG -sheer poetry.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Next for me is working on getting the feature version of PIN-UP made. As I mentioned, the script is written and I’ve had a budget put together on how much it will cost to make- that turns out to be 2.8 million. (Not a huge sum but more than I have in my pocket!) Now I need either the money- OR to attract an actress or executive producer who loves the material and can help draw that money. I also have 2 screenplays under option being shopped to major directors and talent, so my fingers are crossed on those as well. So that’s what’s next!

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Interview with Filmmaker Peta Milan (RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN)

RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN played to rave reviews at the August 2018 FEMALE Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Peta Milan: I have a close working relationship with Victim Support Europe and they wanted me to create a film for them on cybercrime. I had read over the past year about the number of young people around the world committing suicide because they had been subject to revenge porn. The case of Tiziana Cantone in Italy in 2016 moved me the most. Her sex tape went viral and she killed herself, and I wondered whether it was the release of the sex tape itself or the huge amount of secondary victimisation and inescapability of the content that had her feel so desperately like it would never end.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

We had a very short time frame to come up with the concept, write the script and shoot is as there was so little money available for this film. The whole process took 1 week.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Debate Initiator

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Definitely the funding We shot this in Serbia and had to call in favours from friends in the film production industry there. Everyone was great, they believed in the story and the need for discussion on this issue.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

The mediators said it was the most polarizing film of the night, which I was very happy about. Some criticised the film and said it was like a PSA, and others thought it was a movie about trust and betrayal. I liked that people began debating the issue and discussing what they would do if it happened to them or a friend. In the end, the audience rallied behind Justine, the main character and said they would have her back. But the reality is for many this support is never obtained. I spoke with the mother of a young boy in Belgium who had taken his own life as explicit images were shared without his consent. After he had already passed away, the same perpetrators set up a fake Instagram account and continued to share the images. The process for the mother through all of this, including trying to get Facebook to take down the images, without deleting her deceased sons Facebook account and all of its associated memories was completely harrowing. I want films like Right To Be Forgotten to spark debate and have us openly engage in dialogue about how we could support people who are victims of this crime.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Seeing news reports on a number of youth around the world committing suicide as victims of revenge porn. I wanted to do something that would speak to younger audiences, not as a warning not to share pictures of themselves, because I think in this day and age, especially when we’re in trusting romantic relationships, we do share images with the one we love, especially when some of use travel so much for work. It’s more about thinking in advance about “how would I feel if the whole world saw this?” If you don’t feel ok with it don’t do it, if you are ok then do what makes you happy. But our ability to be without privacy should be our litmus test about what we chose to share and what we chose not to.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Gone with The Wind. I love Scarlett O’Hara beyond belief and I love writing women

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I like Film Freeway, it’s a great platform to expand a films exposure, and that’s what it is all about at the end of the day. We want our films to be seen.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

This is a hard question to answer as I love music and listen to it all of the time.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

I am working on a 5 – part docu-series on counter-terrorism and countger0radicalisation that addresses victim and first responder impact and the mothers of radicalised youth working in communities to prevent radicalisation. For some they have never recovered and others have had their experiences become transformative and have dedicated their lives to counter-radicalisation or victim support. The series also takes a look at masculinity and what is it about notions of masculinity that have 95% of our radicalised people being men or young boys, whether its radical Islamists, jihadist, neo-Nazi’s or far alt-right or even the recent upsurge of Incel attacks. Most importantly we take a cross-cultural view of this issues travelling across 9 different cities in 9 different countries with an even look at the different forms of terrorist attacks as undertaken by the different forms of radicalisation mentioned.