Under 5 Minute Short – MIRRORS, by R. Harris Smith

Under 5 minute film festival

Genre: Horror, Thriller

Young Rachel is getting ready for bed, but as she sleeps, she worries her reflection might be watching her. Once her eyes are closed, her bedroom mirror reflection gets off the bed and presses itself against the mirror. Tapping to get out

CAST LIST:

Narrator: Hugh Ritchie
Rachel: Georgia Grant

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?

‘Mirrors’ is about the fear of your reflection watching you as you sleep – almost an extension of fear of the dark, I suppose.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

As a short film, it is simple to make but can be particularly frightening at the same time.

4. How would you describe this script in two words?

Quite scary.

5. What movie have you seen the most times in your life?

Probably…

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Interview with Filmmaker Robin De Cock (TRUMPETS IN THE SKY)

TRUMPETS IN THE SKY won BEST FILM at the May 2018 Fantasy/Sci-Fi FEEDBACK Film Festival in Torotno

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Robin De Cock: The idea of a sound that terrorized the world came to me in a weird moment while listening to dubstep (I know that’s pretty terrible motivation). But when I talked to my friends and peers about the idea, a muslim friend of mine said that in the Koran, the end of the world (or signs of the hour) was introduced by a worldwide horn sound. And that made me do more research in the more biblical narrative of my idea. As it turns out in the bible, koran and even in the Norse mythology (the gjallerhorn of ragnarok) the horn was something that was clearly stated and connected to the end of times. I thought that it was an interesting take and narrative direction to take the script to a new perspective. And with the character of a deaf child we can explore the difficulties and extrimities of the idea through an innocent view. Take the horns out of the equation and what we have left is a small family drama between mother, child and father. And I think it’s important in every story, sci-fi or otherwise, to tell a intimate story that people can relate to. The pressure is just on a higher level due to the higher power that is affecting the world.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It was a difficult 2 years from the initial idea to the final result. I was struggling with some personal problems wich made me procrastinate a lot and I ended up just never being sure if this is the story I want to tell. After some self reflection and an awful lot of rewriting I got the final draft and started the production. I got the privilege to get an awesome crew (very compact but awesome) and we just made it happen.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Post-apocalyptic drama

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

My biggest obstacle in completing this film is the obstacle i’ve been facing all my life. It’s myself. I tend to sabotage myself and end up not finishing my projects. I am pretty harsh on myself (and others) so i’m never really content with what i’m making or doing. But just pulling through on this project gave me the motivation and self respect to push further and harder on my goals.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

Damn that shit amazing. I’m from Belgium and just starting to make films, and seeing people from across the world discussing your film is so exciting. I started making films to get an audience for my stories, and just seeing it happening gave me chills.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video of your short film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

As I said, a little bit of dubstep and a whole lot of talking, learning and rewriting.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Children of men. Sci-fi with it’s feet on the ground. Where the scary thing are the people and the sci-fi is small, well executed and close to the way things are today.
+ dat sweet sweet camera work. Best oners in history!

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I used it for the first time for this project and I like it. It’s a intuitive, filmmaker-friendly platform to showcase your projects. It also motivated me to make a trailer just to showcase my project some more. As it is a schoolproject (My second year in the film academy in Brussels) It’s nice to have the option to show your early projects to a large audience and maybe get some recognition along the way.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Damn, that’s a hard one. I guess, Eminem: Cleaning out my closet. It’s also my go-to karaoke song but I fail every time.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Next year I’m starting my Bacheloryear in Fiction Film in RITCS (Royal Institute of Television Cinema and Sound – Brussels) and I have an idea that keeps me up at night (in a good way) It’s going to be a psychological thriller. The rest i’ll keep a secret. 😊

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Sertac Bozkurt (WINE & EGGS)

WINE & EGGS played to rave reviews at the April 2018 Under 5 Minute Film Festival in Toronto.

1. What motivated you to make this film?

– It’s a filmmaking and directing workshop project at Istanbul Film Academy.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

– 5 months.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

– Wine and Eggs : )

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

– The rain effect : )

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

– I was with my friend when I got the feedback video. I was very happy and shared with my friend.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Videos of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

– The idea belongs to my brother’s wife. I told her I needed a script to make a short film. A few days later she called me and told me the story. I was very impressed at the first time I listened. Then we worked on the script together.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

– It may not be the film I seen the most but my favorite and touching film is Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s “Cloud of May”.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

– Filmfreeway is my favorite festival platform. I submitted to many festivals through this platform. Making it much easier for filmmakers.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

– Pink Floyd’s “High Hopes” is my favorite song and video clip.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

– It’s been 2 years since my film. I really want to make a new film. I’m working on a superhero film that’s in the idea stage.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Andy Koeger (ROSIE, OH)

ROSIE, OH was the winner of BEST FILM at the May 2018 FEEDBACK Film Festival in Los Angeles.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Andy Koeger: My co-creator Apple Xenos originally had the idea for the film. I was so drawn to her idea that I was inspired to create it with her as my Senior Thesis Film at SCAD, the Savannah College of Art and Design. We became obsessed with creating a story that took place all in one singular moment in a person’s life.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

We had the idea the summer before our last year of art school. I made the film as a thesis project, where students were given 10 week for development, 10 weeks of preproduction and production, and 10 weeks of postproduction. All in all, it took us a year to create the film from start to finish.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Experiential moment.

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

There were so many obstacles in creating a one-shot short film. We troubleshooted the technical aspects so thoroughly that they became significantly less of a challenge as we figured out the best way to make the film feel seamless. My biggest fear however was in finding the right actress for the lead role, as that performance would basically become the entire film. We got really lucky when we found Maddie Dixon-Poirier, the lead actress.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It was cool to hear from the audience without me having to be involved in the discussion! I heard a couple new things from audience members, which was cool. The film has been circulating film festivals for about a year and a half, so I had heard lots and lots of opinions, concerns, questions, and praise throughout it’s distribution process. The film generally garners extreme opinions, and this audience was no different in that.

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Apple came up with the idea, then together we decided to create the film in one single shot, which really transformed the way we told the story.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

Pulp Fiction is my favorite film. I’m drawn to it’s iconography, vibes, and how it gets you to think outside the box about what film is and what it can be.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

I love it! FilmFreeway makes learning about and submitting to festivals super easy. I appreciate how the contact info is readily available for the festivals so I can reach out to them directly.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Super unrelated to my filmmaking but probably Xtal by Aphex Twin. That kinda early 90’s electronic music relates more to my next film I guess : )

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Yes! I’ve made two other shorts since Rosie, Oh, and I also direct lots of commercials and music videos. I live in LA but travel frequently for my shoots. I’m currently writing a feature screenplay with my film school dream-team Dan Frantz and Clayton McCracken, which we aim to bring to the big screen in the next couple years. I’m not going to give away too many deets about the film, but it’s an aggressive and drug-fueled journey of a group of rag-tag kids who run a pirate-radio station in the early 90’s. It’s going to be super weird, vibey, and a lot of fun.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Kurtis Theorin (MARY & MARSHA IN THE MANOR OF MADNESS)

MARY & MARSHA IN THE MANOR OF MADNESS played to rave reviews at the May 2018 FEEDBACK Film Festival in Los Angeles.
 
Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Kurtis Theorin: Kris, the animator/director, wanted to do a project where he could learn 2D animation. He had a final project due for one of his college classes so we figured that would be good deadline to motivate himself to go out and make something.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

The idea phase went through many, many iterations before we got something we liked and was feasible. Kris then did most of the animation in a very busy week and a half period in order to meet his class deadline. After that we did some revisions which took another week.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

Lovecraft Scooby-doo

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Making sure everyone understood a somewhat complicated story in a short amount of time without dialogue took a lot of careful planning and creativity, but I think we finally go it.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

“Oh, thank god they like it. I actually have some idea about how to make good films and am not a fraud.”

Watch the Audience FEEDBACK Video of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

Kris and I both like the Lovecraft setting so that was a good genre to think about. There is a Lovecraft board game called Mansions of Madness where you play characters exploring a spooky mansion hiding a dark secret. This seemed like a good framework to start with. The premise of a character rescuing their girlfriend provided good motivation for the characters to propel the story forward. Finally, since we were doing 2d animation I thought it might be interesting having the film occur in a 2d sidescrolling perspective, similar to video games like Mario or Castlevania, while everything was running around and going haywire. This made the animation side of production similar and also gave the film a sense of ruckus and momentum that I really wanted.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

As a kid I watched Return of the Jedi 100 times. Nowadays I have The Third Man memorized.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It is an incredibly convenient platform. In terms of platforms acting on what they set out to do, it is in the top ten.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

According to my iTunes it is the main theme from the anime show Baccano! I’ve also probably heard Bohemian Rhapsody over 300 times.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

We are in various stages of production on a couple of short films. We are also continuing our commercial business of making branded content on social media for toy companies like LEGO and Mattel.

 

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

Interview with Filmmaker Kristin Gorell (THE FLOWER GATE)

THE FLOWER GATE played to rave reviews at the May 2018 Sci-Fi/Fantasy FEEDBACK Film Festival in Toronto.

Matthew Toffolo: What motivated you to make this film?

Kristin Gorell: I set out originally to make a puppet play to participate in a local theater program for fun- but as I started the script, it turned into a short film rather quickly and I decided to just go ahead and make it instead. I also saw the making of this film as an opportunity for healing in action for several of the people involved in different ways. I actually didn’t think much about showing this film until I started editing and found I was making something I truly liked. It was a lovely surprise to make something for different reasons than creating a product and then to love the finished piece as if it had been approached in a more precious fashion. I wrote/shot with very personal, immediate, and intuitive goals and it turned into something that felt like a piece of living poetry to me. I am so delighted to be able to share it now.

2. From the idea to the finished product, how long did it take for you to make this short?

It was shot in about a week on a trip to Israel, with one scene being directed over skype for an extra shooting when I started going through the previous footage. I started writing in February and finished the film entirely by the end of September that same year. It took me some time to find the right editor- a couple of months in the middle were mostly lost to that- but once I found Antonio, everything clicked.

3. How would you describe your short film in two words!?

inside outside

4. What was the biggest obstacle you faced in completing this film?

Living in a different country than my location and having no real budget, working with limited borrowed equipment on a tight time frame, all of this was challenging. Additionally, shooting a film about the realities of a failing relationship with your recent ex has its own challenges.

5. What were your initial reactions when watching the audience talking about your film in the feedback video?

It was overwhelming in the best of ways to feel the moderator’s genuine affection for the film as well as the audience member who bravely spoke so eloquently as well. I felt a real mix of astonishment and contentment to reach the audience in a way they could personally relate with while also engendering a layered process of intellectual engagement.

Watch the AUDIENCE FEEDBACK of the Short Film:

6. How did you come up with the idea for this short film?

The idea for this story came while I was reading the original tale by Hans Christian Andersen. I stopped midway and started wondering what it might be like if told today from the eyes of a similarly isolated female character. By the time I finished reading the original, images from scenes and and dialogue were starting to arise. I began rough work on the script that night.

7. What film have you seen the most in your life?

I haven’t counted but it would be between these perhaps… Groundhog Day, Ran, Rear Window. I also love films from the early days of cinema.

8. You submitted to the festival via FilmFreeway, what are you feelings of the submission platform from a filmmaker’s perspective?

It’s easy to use and overall a good experience working with that platform. There could be some improvements made on the information available to film makers about the different festivals and better ways to search festivals that might be a good fit for your work.

9. What song have you listened to the most times in your life?

Really hard to say… probably something that tracks back to my childhood like – Here Comes The Sun (Beatles). I’ve loved that song since I was a wee lass.

10. What is next for you? A new film?

Definitely more films. I’m also working on drawings/paintings, a stage play, and a novel.

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Interviewer Matthew Toffolo is currently the CEO of the WILDsound FEEDBACK Film & Writing Festival. The festival that showcases 20-50 screenplay and story readings performed by professional actors every single month. And the FEEDBACK Monthly Festival held in downtown Toronto, and Los Angeles at least 3 times a month. Go to http://www.wildsoundfestival.com for more information and to submit your work to the festival.

ACTION Best Scene Reading of THE KANDAHAR MAN, by J. Jermaine Jones

Action/Adventure Film & Screenplay Festival

Genre: Action, Adventure

A battlefield medic and her Marine unit in Afghanistan investigate a missing patrol to discover a legendary wild man may be responsible.

CAST LIST:

Jose: Scott Beaudin
Franco: Nick Wicht
Narrator: John Fray
Cierra: Val Cole
Maya: Kierston Drier

Get to know the writer:

 1. What is your screenplay about?

After the massacre of her patrol unit by a legendary wild man, a critically wounded battlefield medic must find a way to radio for help before she bleeds out — or gets discovered by the wild man — in the deserts of Afghanistan.

2. What genres does your screenplay fall under?

Horror. Action. Military Action. Urban. Sci-fi.

3. Why should this screenplay be made into a movie?

I think the interesting factor about this story is it’s not only based on true events, but the main character is a female battlefield medic and famous YouTuber.

4. How…

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